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Staff Reports | October 16, 2013
Sylvia Mathews Burwell, director of the Office of Management and Budget, said in a statement that  federal employees  should expect to return to work on Thursday. "Now that the bill has passed the United States Senate and the House of Representatives, the President plans to sign it tonight and employees should expect to return to work in the morning," she said. "Employees should be checking the news and OPM's website for further updates. "  Maryland has been particularly vulnerable to the shutdown, with 314,000 residents - a tenth of the state's workforce - employed by the federal government and another 250,000 working for federal contractors.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | October 16, 2013
Sylvia Mathews Burwell, director of the Office of Management and Budget, said in a statement that  federal employees  should expect to return to work on Thursday. "Now that the bill has passed the United States Senate and the House of Representatives, the President plans to sign it tonight and employees should expect to return to work in the morning," she said. "Employees should be checking the news and OPM's website for further updates. "  Maryland has been particularly vulnerable to the shutdown, with 314,000 residents - a tenth of the state's workforce - employed by the federal government and another 250,000 working for federal contractors.
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NEWS
September 26, 1990
The County Commissioners have agreed to give $20,000 to Target Inc., a non-profit agency which provides training and employment to the developmentally disabled, to make up for the reduction in an outside contract.The Marriott Corp., which has employed workers from Target, reduced its contract with the agency by about $40,000, said Steven D.Powell, County Department of Management and Budget director.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | October 5, 2007
It is an announcement federal employees dread. Instead of being laid off, furloughed or bought out - although that can happen, too - federal workers are told that they must "recompete" for their jobs against private-sector companies. Typically, more than a year after the announcement, the agency decides whether to find "efficiencies" in its work force or give the work to a private firm. Few enjoy competing to keep a job. And now, after several years of fighting with the Bush administration and a Republican Congress over the process, called A-76, the workers' unions have more powerful advocates on Capitol Hill, where the House and Senate are now controlled by Democrats.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | December 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Nineteen-year-old Danita Hill jumped at the chance in July to work at the Health Care Financing Administration in Woodlawn, which participates in a popular federal program to give disadvantaged high school and college students job experience and pay at federal agencies."
NEWS
March 3, 1991
County agencies and departments are awaiting the county budget office's recommendations on their revised budgets for the rest of this fiscal year and for 1992.Following a directive to resubmit fiscal 1991 budgets with 1 percent cuts and fiscal 1992 budgets -- which take effect July 1 -- with 2 percent cuts, many agencies plan to reduce their personnel, travel, supplies and money.The emergency budget measures come as the county faces a $5.3 million shortfall in the current $115 million budget.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1999
During a hearing last night on the proposed county budget for fiscal year 2000, the Deer Park recreation council pleaded with the Carroll County commissioners for $29,990 to pave the entrance to the popular Westminster sports complex."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
Feeding the elderly poor and counseling sexual abuse victims are more important to the Carroll Commissioners than sending county employees to conventions and seminars.During the second round of budget hearings Thursday, the commissioners restored social programs that only a week ago were proposed to be cut from next year's $112 million budget."We made a conscious effort find some money elsewhere in the budget," said Commissioner Julia W. Gouge. "Those social services have tobe a priority."
NEWS
April 10, 2005
Last week's Speak Out question asked what should be done with the county's budget surplus, which will top $50 million for fiscal 2005. Not all of the surplus in budget up for grabs I was glad to see your April 3, 2005, question on the County Budget. We are always interested in public input, but I need to clarify a point. The projected increase in the budget from FY '05 to FY '06 is a little more than $50 million. Of that increase, the Department of Management and Budget recommended that the Commissioners focus the use of approximately $29 million on capital projects like roads and schools rather than adding on-going operating costs.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | May 26, 1991
The County Commissioners expect to remedy growing shortfalls in boththe 1991 and 1992 budgets by making what promise to be some painful cuts by Thursday.Management and Budget Director Steven D. Powell told the commissioners Thursday they would have to cut another $1 million to balance this year's budget because of lower-than-anticipated income tax receipts. The commissioners already reduced spending by $5.3 million in several stages to address the continuously worsening 1991 deficit.Powell also reported that the projected shortfall for 1992 had grown by about $900,000, to $1.94 million, largely because of reduced earnings on bonds the county sold to finance improvements for Carroll County General Hospital.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,Sun reporter | March 2, 2007
After a yearlong legislative inquiry of former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s personnel practices, the Senate approved two watered-down bills yesterday that clarify the hiring and firing authority of state agencies but do not reduce the number of at-will positions in Maryland government. Most Republican senators voted for one of the proposals but argued that the measures, which require a review of the state personnel system, did not merit the time and money poured into the Ehrlich inquiry.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld is allowing the Army to approach White House budget officials by itself to argue for substantial increases in resources, a significant divergence from initial plans by Rumsfeld and his inner circle to cut the Army to pay for new technology and a new way of war. With its troops and equipment worn down by years of fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Army appears certain to receive a huge spike in its...
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | September 29, 2006
The Department of Homeland Security abandoned its final court appeal this week in its push to take greater control over the way the agency fires, pays and negotiates with its workers. The decision leaves union contracts intact. Larry Orluskie, a spokesman for Homeland Security, said that the Solicitor General's office, which handles all appellate litigation on behalf of the federal government, made the call not to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. A federal district judge and three-panel appeals court already had voided workplace rules that would have allowed top officials to "unilaterally" ignore union contracts and implement reforms without consulting with workers.
NEWS
April 24, 2005
The Carroll County government has launched County Connection, a monthly newsletter, to keep residents informed of issues within the county government. The newsletter is expected to contain articles and lists of votes of the county commissioners and meetings of numerous boards and commissions, organizers said. "This newsletter is part of our commitment to put government actions before the public," said Commissioner Dean L. Minnich. "It puts us on the record and shows a willingness to continue a dialogue with the people we serve, to acknowledge accountability and accept responsibility for all that we do in the public interest.
NEWS
April 10, 2005
Last week's Speak Out question asked what should be done with the county's budget surplus, which will top $50 million for fiscal 2005. Not all of the surplus in budget up for grabs I was glad to see your April 3, 2005, question on the County Budget. We are always interested in public input, but I need to clarify a point. The projected increase in the budget from FY '05 to FY '06 is a little more than $50 million. Of that increase, the Department of Management and Budget recommended that the Commissioners focus the use of approximately $29 million on capital projects like roads and schools rather than adding on-going operating costs.
NEWS
April 27, 2003
Town meetings set to discuss budget proposal The Carroll County Department of Management and Budget will hold three community meetings this week to present the proposed budget for fiscal year 2004. Meetings are scheduled for: Tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Westminster East Middle School media center, 121 Longwell Ave. Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Mount Airy Town Hall, 110 S. Main St. Thursday at 7 p.m. at Taneytown Elementary School gymnasium, 100 Kings Drive. Ted Zaleski, director of management and budget, will present information on the proposed budget, take public comment and answer questions.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Clinton administration officials yesterday reduced their forecast for this year's federal budget deficit by $14.7 billion because unexpectedly strong economic growth has produced enough tax revenue to offset the costs of higher interest rates.But they cautioned that unless long-term interest rates fell to their levels earlier this year, higher interest on the national debt would result in slightly higher deficits later in the decade.Yesterday's announcement of the revision was the latest in a series of estimates by government and private economists that the federal government's finances are improving.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 3, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The $2.13 trillion budget plan that President Bush will send to Congress tomorrow will for the first time formally assess the performance of government agencies and programs and to some degree link their financing to the grades they receive, administration officials said. Based on an internal review conducted by the White House Office of Management and Budget, the budget gives uniformly poor marks to all the major Cabinet departments in five categories of management, including personnel and finances.
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