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NEWS
October 10, 1995
Anne Arundel County's planners for the Million Man March have scheduled a rally for 7 p.m. tomorrow at the Newtowne 20 recreation center on Forest Drive in Annapolis to sign up black men who want to join the march Monday in Washington.Lewis A. Bracy, Anne Arundel County coordinator for the march, said those who wish to leave from Annapolis to attend the march should attend the rally.March planners in the county have distributed 3,000 fliers in majority-black neighborhoods, Mr. Bracy said.
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NEWS
By Justin George and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Baltimore police are investigating three shootings Thursday night that wounded three men. All are expected to survive, police said. A 25-year-old man was found shot in the back in South Baltimore's Brooklyn neighborhood at about 5:30 p.m. Investigators said the man dropped a friend off in the unit block of Washburn Ave. when an unknown suspect pulled out a handgun and fired into the vehicle, striking him. The suspect fled and the victim was...
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NEWS
December 13, 1995
THE MOST FREQUENTLY expressed fear before the Million Man March was that it would anoint Louis Farrakhan, the anti-Semitic head of the Nation of Islam, as the singular African-American leader. Two months later, there is scant evidence that has happened. And with the naming of the charismatic Kweisi Mfume to head the NAACP, there is less reason for those, who insist black people need a principal spokesman, to look to Mr. Farrakhan to fill that role.Mr. Farrakhan has been treated with more deference by former critics since succeeding in bringing tens of thousands to Washington.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
The 300 Man March, Baltimore's latest effort to rally against the worsening toll of killings that has hit the city this summer, turns out to have been inaptly named. Significantly more people than that are reported to have shown up - twice that many, by some estimates. They were people who are fed up with their communities being defined, their lives being dictated, by those who trade in violence and intimidation. It is widely known here that no matter how high Baltimore may climb on the list of America's most dangerous cities, that danger is largely confined to a handful of neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Luke Tracy and Luke Tracy,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
Ayinde Jean-Baptiste, who gained notice at age 12 for his speech at the Million Man March in Washington, spoke last night on the continuing legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Anne Arundel County NAACP's 15th annual awards dinner in Linthicum. "Truth isn't always easy or beautiful to hear," Jean-Baptiste told a crowd of about 1,200 before elaborating on continuing problems across the United States and the world. He said King advocated more than just tolerance. In keeping with King's legacy, he encouraged people to think globally, including speaking out for the rights of Palestinians and urging caution in dealing with Iraq.
NEWS
October 12, 1995
MAYOR KURT L. SCHMOKE, Rep. Kweisi Mfume and other politicians, local and national, are taking a big risk by endorsing Monday's Million Man March that is the brainchild of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan."
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
David Miller, a young man committed to improving livesaround him, used to teach basic life skills to prison inmates. Then he attended Louis Farrakhan's Million Man March -- which celebrates its third anniversary today -- and returned to Baltimore determined to reach black youngsters before they reach the criminal justice system."
NEWS
By Kaana Smith and Kaana Smith,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1996
The best way to translate the spirit of the Million Man March into a stronger black community is to organize neighborhoods to attack the economic and political problems that affect people of color, said the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., national director of last year's march.Chavis, former executive director of the NAACP, spoke yesterday to an estimated 5,000 people at "Baltimore's Men of the March: A Day of Commitment" at the Baltimore Arena, a follow-up to October's Million Man March in Washington.
NEWS
By JoANNA DAEMMRICH and JoANNA DAEMMRICH,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1995
Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke plans to participate in a march of African-American men on Washington next month that is being promoted as a show of unity and moral commitment.Mr. Schmoke has come out squarely in support of the Million Man March, which has gained momentum with endorsements from prominent black leaders but continues to be controversial because it was conceived by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and it excludes women.All of the city's 26,136 employees will be free to use personal or vacation time to take part in the Oct. 16 demonstration on the National Mall.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1995
The message of "giving back" that resounded at the Million Man March was a sweet note in Lonnie J. Carr's ears.As president of 100 Black Men of Maryland, Mr. Carr has been preaching the sermon that successful African-Americans ought to go into depressed communities and lend a hand.But the march gave the sermon a wider, more captive audience."It's sent a message we've always sent to the African-American community," said Mr. Carr, whose organization was formed in 1991 and encourages men to help disadvantaged city youths by helping them academically and taking them to cultural and sporting events.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | September 25, 2007
We black Americans seem to need a major event or outrage every so often to revive our mass energies in ways that remind us of the 1960s civil rights movement. In the 1980s, we had mass arrests at the South African embassy to protest apartheid. In the 1990s, there was the Million Man March to redeem black fatherhood and proper role modeling. In 2007, we have the "Jena 6." Thousands flowed by the busload into tiny Jena, La., last week. They came to march on behalf of six black youths who were originally charged with attempted murder for allegedly beating up a white youth last December at the local high school in what many describe as a schoolyard fight.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | October 12, 2005
The Million Man March of 1995 has not yet achieved the mythic aura of the "I Have a Dream" speech of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. But it has become a modern landmark for African-American men, symbolizing a rededication to home, family and moral values. Clips from a new documentary being made to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the Oct. 16, 1995, Washington march will be shown tonight at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture. An anniversary march, the Millions More Movement, will be held this weekend in Washington.
NEWS
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
On Oct. 16, 1995, hundreds of thousands of African-American men from around the nation poured into Washington, D.C., in search of spiritual renewal and fraternal strength. As they stood together on the Mall, basking in the autumn sun, the men of the Million Man March pledged to take responsibility for their actions, to serve their families and their communities, and to improve themselves and the world in which they lived. Kurt Schmoke, then mayor of Baltimore, brought his 24-year-old stepson.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
Glenelg High School will present The Music Man from March 10 to 13 in the school's newly renovated arts wing. A cast of 85 will perform the musical under the direction of drama teacher Sue Miller. Doors will open at 7 p.m. for Thursday, Friday and Saturday performances and at 2 p.m. for Saturday and Sunday matinees. Tickets, which can be purchased at the school, are $8 in advance; $10 at the door. Information: 410-313-5528. The school's award-winning Jazz Ensemble will present its annual concert, this year featuring woodwind artist Chris Vadala.
NEWS
By Luke Tracy and Luke Tracy,SUN STAFF | January 16, 2003
Ayinde Jean-Baptiste, who gained notice at age 12 for his speech at the Million Man March in Washington, spoke last night on the continuing legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. at the Anne Arundel County NAACP's 15th annual awards dinner in Linthicum. "Truth isn't always easy or beautiful to hear," Jean-Baptiste told a crowd of about 1,200 before elaborating on continuing problems across the United States and the world. He said King advocated more than just tolerance. In keeping with King's legacy, he encouraged people to think globally, including speaking out for the rights of Palestinians and urging caution in dealing with Iraq.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
David Miller, a young man committed to improving livesaround him, used to teach basic life skills to prison inmates. Then he attended Louis Farrakhan's Million Man March -- which celebrates its third anniversary today -- and returned to Baltimore determined to reach black youngsters before they reach the criminal justice system."
NEWS
October 6, 1996
THE PALTRY turnout for an African-American political convention that Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan promoted as the next step after the Million Man March was in a way more evidence of the power of that earlier event.Thousands of African-Americans who participated in the 1995 rally in Washington said the experience was spiritual and personal. They praised Mr. Farrakhan for staging it, but insisted the march was not about him. Sure enough, only a few hundred registered for the black political convention last weekend in St. Louis, an event that Mr. Farrakhan's surrogates had predicted 30,000 would attend.
NEWS
October 22, 1995
NATION OF ISLAM leader Louis Farrakhan is trying his best to use the Million Man March as a springboard. He wants to be acknowledged as THE black leader. But while Mr. Farrakhan may have gained new respect from African Americans and others initially skeptical about the march, that does not mean he should now be treated like an incarnation of Martin Luther King.Many marchers went to Washington wishing it had been planned by someone other than Mr. Farrakhan. Most left the event heartened by what had transpired and giving credit to Mr. Farrakhan for having conceived the idea, but no more willing to be counted as followers of the NOI leader than they were before.
NEWS
September 4, 1998
MEMORIES of the acrimony that preceded the Million Man March of 1995 have blurred. Fears raised by Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan's plans for that mass rally are not recalled as vividly as stories of the harmonious event that took place.Years hence, will that also be the case with the Million Youth March to be held this weekend in Harlem? One can only hope.New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani tried to withhold a parade permit for the march, organized by former Nation of Islam henchman Khalid Abdul Muhammad, whose anti-Semitic rhetoric was deplored even by Mr. Farrakhan.
NEWS
By E. R. Shipp | September 1, 1998
AS THE CONTROVERSY continues over the Million Youth March that its conveners concede will draw only a small fraction of that number, one has to ask: Is marching overrated these days?The question is all the more relevant because we just marked the 35th anniversary of the mother of all marches, the one that took place in Washington on Aug. 28, 1963. Originally called by labor leader A. Philip Randolph to demand "jobs and freedom," it eventually became a demand that the president and Congress enact civil rights legislation then languishing in committee.
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