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Mammography

NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | February 14, 1992
Cancer kills many women, especially low-income women, because they can't afford mammography exams and Pap smear tests or because they don't understand the importance of regular screening, health experts say.Of the 1,772 women who died from breast and cervical cancer in Maryland in 1987 and 1988, the most recent period for which figures are available, more than a third might have been saved if their cancers had been discovered early enough, according to...
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NEWS
By Samuel Epstein | January 31, 1992
IT HAS BEEN widely (and with reason) charged that the makers and marketers of silicone breast implants, and self-interested plastic surgeons, made women their guinea pigs. But what of that other, and greater, scourge of women, breast cancer? There is reason to believe that women are equally ill-served by the cancer Establishment, especially in its unrelenting promotion of mammography.Breast cancer now strikes one in nine women, a dramatic increase from the one in 20 in 1950. This year, 180,000 new cases and 46,000 deaths are expected.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff HBB | December 11, 1991
For the first time, Johns Hopkins Hospital is asking the surrounding East Baltimore community to tell hospital medical experts what it wants and needs to combat its health problems.And, based on preliminary discussions with the advisory board of the new initiative, announced today, the hospital soon will be tackling many of the most difficult health problems the community faces.These include asthma -- which sends many children to the hospital's emergency room and keeps them out of school -- lung and breast cancer, infant mortality and stemming the spread of HIV disease, several members of the board said.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | May 11, 1991
Hoping to lower breast-cancer death rates by detecting the disease early, the University of Maryland Medical Center will crisscross the state in a new, $260,000 specially equipped mammography van, bringing low-cost screening mammograms to women at their workplaces and in their communities."
NEWS
February 3, 1991
Drs. Copeland, Hyman & Shackman will open a full-service imaging facility in Harford County this summer.The new location in Bel Air will be headquartered at the 31,000-square-foot Plumtree Professional Center. The new facility will feature state-of-the-art imaging equipment.Drs. Copeland, Hyman and Shackman are radiologists who specializein diagnosing diseases with such innovative tools as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computer tomography (CT), ultrasound, nuclear medicine and mammography.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | October 31, 1990
WASHINGTON -- In a development expected to save thousands of women's lives, Congress has added mammography benefits to Medicare that will pay for breast cancer screening for people 65 and older and the disabled beginning next year.The new benefits, which will cover women and men, were agreed to during the final hours of budget negotiations last Friday by an all-male committee meeting in secret. But the committee worked under a warning from leaders of the 140-member congressional women's issues caucus, who said they would oppose any budget that failed to include mammography benefits, according to lawmakers involved in the negotiations.
NEWS
By Gregory Spears and Gregory Spears,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 31, 1990
WASHINGTON -- In a development expected to save thousands of women's lives, Congress has added mammography benefits to Medicare that will pay for breast cancer screening for people 65 and older and the disabled beginning next year.The new benefits, which will cover women and men, were agreed to during the final hours of budget negotiations last Friday by an all-male committee meeting in secret. But the committee worked under a warning from leaders of the 140-member congressional women's issues caucus, who said they would oppose any budget that failed to include mammography benefits, according to lawmakers involved in the negotiations.
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