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Mammograms

BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to the Sun | October 11, 2006
Christine Cullings Mammography technologist Franklin Square Hospital Center, Baltimore County Age --53 Years in business --33 Salary --$61,000 How she got started --Cullings knew she wanted to go into the health care field. So after her stepfather suggested radiology, she graduated from what was the Johns Hopkins Hospital School of Radiologic Technology. She started working in oral surgery taking dental X-rays, then three years later moved to general radiology at Johns Hopkins. She learned how to do mammograms in the early 1980s and as the field became more specialized this became her primary task.
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NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 16, 2004
For women older than 50, having mammograms every two years instead of annually does not hurt their chances that breast cancer will be detected early, researchers reported yesterday. But among women in their 40s, waiting two years was found to slightly increase the risk that the cancer will have progressed to a more dangerous stage when it is diagnosed. The study does not address the larger question of whether women in their 40s should get mammograms at all. The benefit of screening for those women is relatively small, in part because breast cancer is less common at that age. "But for those who choose to get them, we did see a benefit of having one every year," said Emily White, a researcher at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, who conducted the study.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1997
Last week, as Harriet Legum waited for her mammogram at the Johns Hopkins Imaging Center, she fumed about the latest pronouncement from the National Institutes of Health. Unable to confirm the life-saving value of routine mammograms for women in their 40s, an NIH panel said Thursday that these women should weigh the evidence and decide for themselves whether to have the test.A breast cancer survivor, Legum was furious that anyone -- let alone a prestigious national health organization -- would refuse to recommend regular mammograms for women in their 40s. Her frustration spoke for millions of American women who expect guidance from national experts and instead find confusion about whether mammograms will help save their lives.
FEATURES
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1998
Most everybody buys a card for Mom on Mother's Day, right?This year, before May 10, you can spend your $1.99 for a card that will benefit a foundation that links uninsured women with organizations that offer free mammograms.Established in 1990, the Rite Aid Mother's Day Mammograms this year offers cards designed by three celebrities - actress Teri Hatcher, model Cheryl Tiegs and actor Stephen Baldwin. The cards are sold at Rite Aid drugstores.During May, women also can pick up a free mammogram pamphlet on breast health care.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 30, 2004
The third annual Bea Gaddy Day, held in tribute to the woman who was hailed as the "Mother Teresa of Baltimore," will be held Saturday, marked by a citywide collection of non- perishable food, free health screenings and live entertainment. Gaddy, who fed thousands of needy people every Thanksgiving and ran a shelter for women and children, died of breast cancer Oct. 3, 2001, at the age of 68. Food will be collected at scores of locations throughout Baltimore, but the center of this year's celebration, led by City Council President Sheila Dixon, will be Mondawmin Mall, 2401 Liberty Heights Ave., where activities will be held from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. At the mall, several area health care providers will be conducting free screenings, including: Maryland General Hospital, which will provide mammograms, cervical pap smears, diabetes, cholesterol, pregnancy and high-blood-pressure screenings; Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, which will provide mammograms (call 410-955-1348 for an appointment)
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | September 16, 1992
Women over 50 who have been putting off breast cancer and cervical cancer screenings because they couldn't afford the tests can now get them free.The Carroll County Health Department has obtained a $93,000 federal grant to cover cancer-detection screenings for low-income older women."
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer The Boston Globe contributed to this article | January 11, 1995
Researchers who analyzed more than a dozen breast cancer studies have concluded that use of routine mammograms to screen women under 50 won't lower their risk of dying from breast cancer.A second group of researchers specifically recommended that only women between the ages of 50 and 74 be routinely given breast X-rays.Published in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, the articles are the latest round in the debate over whether women between ages 40 and 49 -- with no symptoms or family history of breast cancer -- should have a mammogram.
FEATURES
By Gerri Kobren | July 9, 1991
An article in the "To Your Health" section of yesterday's Sun incorrectly reported a recommendation for how often women should get mammograms. Women age 40 to 49 are advised to have mammograms every year or every other year.The Sun regrets the errors.Cancer prevention and early detection move into the spotlight this afternoon, when Governor William Donald Schaefer is expected to announce formation of a 15-person "Council on Cancer Control."AIt is part of an ongoing state effort to encourage Marylanders to take advantage of tests and procedures with the potential of saving their lives.
NEWS
October 15, 1991
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Sadly, however, in spite of the plethora of information, October remains just one ,, month out of 12 in which the most common cancer diagnosis among women will be breast cancer.This year alone, 175,000 new cases will be discovered and 45,000 people will die. Many of them do not have to. Too often breast cancer is diagnosed at a late stage, when it is detectable as a lump. But statistics show that when it is detected early,through mammograms, for instance, women have a better than 90 percent chance of survival.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Courting women's support for health care reform, President Clinton called on state governments, insurance companies, medical facilities and businesses to adopt policies that widen access to appropriate and affordable mammography. He also pledged additional government support for breast cancer research."These resources can save the lives of countless women," the president said during an East Room ceremony as he signed a proclamation declaring today National Mammography Day.A September draft of the health care plan would provide free mammograms only to women 50 and older -- and only at two-year intervals.
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