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By Rafael Alvarez | December 27, 1990
It looks like a huge, above-ground pool, the kind you see in back yards from Parkville to Pasadena.But instead of a bunch of children thrashing around in 4 feet of water, this pool is filled with 1.2 million gallons of water, and all the splashing will be done by three Beluga whales and five Atlantic bottlenose dolphins.The National Aquarium's $35 million Marine Mammal Pavilion opened to the public yesterday, and instantaneous reviews -- ooohs and aaahs -- echoed through the huge, airy amphitheater.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
State and federal officials announced Thursday a $2.2 million research effort aimed at preventing harm to whales and other marine mammals from building massive industrial wind turbines off Ocean City . The two-year study, to be led by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, will include using underwater microphones to record sounds of whales and other marine mammals in the ocean where the federal government is soliciting bids...
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NEWS
By William Mullen and William Mullen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 1, 2005
Sorting through boxes of fossils collected 14 years ago, a Canadian doctoral student discovered the deadly, poisonous bite of a 60 million-year-old mammal the size of a mouse. The first "venom delivery apparatus" ever found in an extinct mammal was described last week in the research journal Nature by the student, Craig Scott, and his professor, vertebrate paleontologist Richard C. Fox of the University of Alberta, Edmonton. Its discovery may shed new light on the reason why mammals, unlike reptiles, seldom evolved to use poisonous bites for predation and protection.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
A deadly virus has stricken Samson, the only elephant born at the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore in its 137-year history, but zoologists are hopeful that he will recover because the strain is thought to be less serious in his species. Samson also has survived longer than others with the virus. Caretakers first noticed the soon-to-be-5-year-old male looking lethargic Feb. 26, and feared it was a sign of what is known as elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus. They began treating him for the disease, which can kill within days, and tests confirmed the virus.
NEWS
January 7, 1991
The Westinghouse Foundation has contributed $30,000 to the National Aquarium's Marine Mammal Pavilion.The funds are to be used on programs designed to educate visitors about whale and dolphin behavior through a combination of audio and video technology and demonstrations from the mammals."
NEWS
By Luther Young | September 17, 1990
It's not what David Weishampel was looking for, but the tiny skeleton found this summer during his annual search for dinosaur bones in northwest Montana may be the prize of his career.Barely three inches long, embedded in a small chunk omudstone, the fossilized bones are the ribs, backbone and tail of a rodent-like mammal that lived 72 million years ago side-by-side with duckbill dinosaurs.And it's a rare find, one of only three of the early mammal skeletons unearthed in North America, said Dr. Weishampel, 37, an assistant professor of anatomy at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.
FEATURES
December 26, 1990
Here's a list of opening week events for the Marine Mammal Pavilion. All outdoors events are free and will take place outside the National Aquarium on Pier 3. Admission will be charged for all events held inside the pavilion or aquarium, except as noted.2 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.: Masterpiece Stamp Stations.TUESDAYThe aquarium hosts an Open House with free admission to the first 1,991 visitors, beginning at 9 a.m.Outside:10 a.m. to 3 p.m.: Comedy team, Disorderly Conduct, Puffin anroving clowns.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
It used to be easy to tell which building was which at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.The original aquarium on Pier 3 was a dark, dreamlike sequence of spaces that immersed visitors in mysterious underwater worlds. Midnight blue walls, charcoal gray carpet, low light levels, brilliant graphics and stunning aquatic habitats helped make it a thoroughly inward-oriented building.The newer Marine Mammal Pavilion on Pier 4 was a bright, open, airy place where visitors could take in sweeping views of the harbor and city skyline while waiting to see bottlenose dolphins in a skylit, 1,300-seat amphitheater.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Scientists digging at a highway construction site south of Smyrna, Del., have turned up the 17-million-year-old remains of a hornless rhinoceros and two species of early horses the size of an Irish setter. They are calling it one of the richest deposits of land-mammal fossils on the East Coast north of Florida."It's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for us," said Dr. Kelvin W. Ramsey, a scientist with the Delaware Geological Survey in Newark. "It's the best fossil site north of Florida for mammals . . . I think for any period."
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2006
People are usually quite certain which animal they most fear. Maybe it's mice; or, perhaps, piranha. A creature that nearly everyone dreads, though, is -- boo! -- bats. Imagine them skittering across a moonlit sky. This thought probably makes you see red, the color of blood, since you're probably still convinced that bats want nothing more than to bury their greedy fangs into your flesh.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez | January 30, 2013
Sharpen your claws, cat owners: NPR caused a bit of a catfight this week with its story on killer kitties , which wasn't about about lions and tigers. No one is surprised that bird lovers and outside cat owners are often at odds -- the debate crops up on my neighborhood email list every few months, with bird people defending their feathered friends from the instincts of felines, and cat owners arguing that kitties have the need to go outside untethered, even in urban areas. According to the NPR story, a Smithsonian Institution scientist has his own theory: that 40 to 70 percent of the U.S.'s 85 million cats are allowed outside either by pet owners or because they're strays (that's 47 million free-range pets for those keeping track)
NEWS
July 18, 2011
Welcome back, old friend. In a summer of discontent across the United States from the record heat wave that's plagued much of the country to the icy deficit reduction talks in Washington, it's good to see a familiar (and might we add unflappable) figure has returned to the Land of Pleasant Living. Let us rejoice in the return of Chessie, the celebrity manatee recently sighted in Calvert County. Thanks to Morgan State University's Estuarine Research Center, the 1,200-pound marine mammal has been positively identified as none other than the one first seen in the Chesapeake Bay 17 years ago. Back in 1994, Chessie's first appearance caused such an uproar - and raised such breathless concern that he wouldn't survive as local water temperatures dropped in the fall - that he was "rescued" and air-lifted back to his native Florida on a U.S. Coast Guard C-130.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2010
Marya Tregellas Strong, a retired volunteer and animal-rights advocate, died of congestive heart failure Oct. 29 at Stella Maris Hospice. The Homeland resident was 89. Born Marya Tregellas in Baltimore and raised on Enfield Road, she attended Bryn Mawr and Roland Park Country schools. Her father, John Tregellas, was a real estate developer who worked in Anneslie and Parkville. After high school, she attended the College of Notre Dame of Maryland and the University of Colorado at Boulder, where she met her future husband, Lloyd A. Tinker, an Army veteran who worked for the Atomic Energy Commission at Los Alamos, N.M. While there, she developed a lifelong love of southwestern Native American culture and art, family members said.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
White-nose syndrome, a deadly fungal infection that has devastated bat populations in New York and New England in the past two years, has now spread to three states on Maryland's borders - and seems poised to strike here next, biologists say. "We are surrounded on all sides," said Aimee Haskew, a faculty research assistant at the University of Maryland's Appalachian Lab in Frostburg. "It's like a guillotine hanging above your neck." An outbreak here could destroy one of the largest hibernating populations surviving in the East of the globally rare Eastern small-footed myotis and gradually wipe out larger bat populations that help to control Maryland's insect pests.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun Reporter | July 20, 2008
OCEAN CITY - Peering toward choppy gray waves and a smear of mid-July humidity that shrouded the horizon early yesterday, Val-Jean Slowinski kept her binoculars at the ready. Trouble was, if you were out scouting dolphins, as she was, it turned into a day at the beach. For the past 17 years, scientists and staff from the National Aquarium in Baltimore and its Marine Animal Rescue program have recruited volunteers such as Slowinski, a Towson resident who summers at the ocean, to help count the bottlenose dolphins as they skim along sandbars and shoals, surfacing to breathe above the murky waves along Maryland's 26-mile coast.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | March 30, 2007
The asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago is often credited with prompting the rise of the mammals we see today - including primates like us. But a new study says the effects of the dinosaurs' demise have been greatly exaggerated. Modern-day mammals, researchers say, displayed an initial burst of evolutionary diversity up to 100 million years ago - while the dinosaurs were still roaming prehistoric swamps.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
One of the world's foremost marine mammal experts has joined the National Aquarium in Baltimore to chart the future of its biological programs.Dr. Joseph R. Geraci, a scientist and educator who had been a consultant to the aquarium since 1990, has advised the International Whaling Commission and government agencies in Canada, Spain, Brazil and the United States."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
Scientists digging at a highway construction site south of Smyrna, Del., have turned up the 17-million-year-old remains of a hornless rhinoceros and two species of early horses the size of an Irish setter. They are calling it one of the richest deposits of land-mammal fossils on the East Coast north of Florida."It's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for us," said Dr. Kelvin W. Ramsey, a scientist with the Delaware Geological Survey in Newark. "It's the best fossil site north of Florida for mammals . . . I think for any period."
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 2006
People are usually quite certain which animal they most fear. Maybe it's mice; or, perhaps, piranha. A creature that nearly everyone dreads, though, is -- boo! -- bats. Imagine them skittering across a moonlit sky. This thought probably makes you see red, the color of blood, since you're probably still convinced that bats want nothing more than to bury their greedy fangs into your flesh.
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