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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 3, 1992
As soon as you read the program note stating that David Mamet's "The Water Engine" started out as a radio play, you realize it's going to differ in at least one respect from much of the playwright's recent work. The language is going to be clean.Then you begin to wonder how an "air play" will translate to the stage. However, Impossible Industrial Action (IIA) -- whose production is the inaugural work in the Theatre Project's new program of local residencies -- is using a script that was adapted by Mamet and produced on Broadway in 1978.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
In Harold Pinter's “The Caretaker,” men who seem to have empty centers where their hearts should be engage in a strange dance involving intimidation and entitlement. In David Mamet's “Glengarry Glen Ross,” which the playwright dedicated to Pinter, men with voids where their morals should be thrash about in a desperate game that also involves intimidation and entitlement. These are two very different works, to be sure, but they share some gritty elements, pose similarly tough questions about human nature, and leave us with similarly elusive answers.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 27, 1993
Near the end of the first half of David Mamet's "Oleanna," a professor tells a student: "That's my job. . . . To provoke you."Provocation is also the job of good theater, and this 95-minute, two-person play, currently at the Kennedy Center, certainly earns an A on that score.In the wake of the Clarence Thomas hearings, Mamet -- who in the past has taken on real estate hustlers, Hollywood hucksters and small-time hoods -- has turned his attention to sexual harassment.The result is a lean, mean and far from unbiased look not only at a hot topic, but also at such subjects as political correctness and, at the most basic level, the difficulty of communication between men and women.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Executive producer Barry Levinson urges viewers to think of his HBO film "Phil Spector" as a two-person play - not a docudrama about the first murder trial of the rock producer. "It really is a two-person piece," Levinson said in a telephone interview last week. "And if you're looking for some kind of docudrama, which we are more familiar with on television, this isn't it. " The two persons, Academy Award-winners Al Pacino as Spector and Helen Mirren as his defense attorney, Linda Kenney Baden, can fill a screen like few others.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal | May 27, 1999
Playwright David Mamet's award-winning dark comedy "American Buffalo" will make its first appearance at Howard Community College's Theatre Outback tomorrow and will run through June 13.The angry and harrowing play, which won the Drama Critics Circle Award for best American play and the Obie Award in 1977, put Mamet on the cultural and theatrical map.The story of the greedy pawnshop owner Donny, a loser ex-convict named Teach and a naive boy called Bobby...
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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Contributing Writer | May 21, 1992
The trials and tribulations of petty thieves are the basis of David Mamet's black comedy-drama, "American Buffalo," currently playing at the Towsontowne Arena Theatre through May 27.Strong language and violence characterize Mamet's piece. The play won the 1977 New York Drama Critics Best Play award and earned the author a prestigious place on the list of contemporary American playwrights.Performed on the stage of the Towsontowne Dinner Theater Mondays through Wednesdays ("Can Can" is playing Thursdays through Sundays)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 28, 2004
Vincent Guastaferro is a card-carrying member of what has been called the "Mamet Mafia." Reaching into his briefcase, the actor removes an engraved notecard on which playwright David Mamet has written: Yo Vincenz -- Mazel tov! Front sight, squeeze the trigger. Give 'em hell in B'more. Love, Dave. Mamet is referring to Guastaferro's role in Center Stage's production of the playwright's Speed-the-Plow, which begins performances Friday. Over the last 2 1/2 decades, Guastaferro has appeared in a dozen Mamet plays or movies, beginning with a 1979 production of Sexual Perversity in Chicago and continuing through Mamet's just-released movie, Spartan.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 12, 2003
The brash and unexpurgated tongue of David Mamet will be heard at Center Stage next season. The theater will produce its first play by the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright in April. Director Irene Lewis - who was still deciding between a Mamet play and a pair of Arthur Miller one-acts when she announced the 2003-2004 season this spring - has committed to producing Mamet's Speed-the-Plow. A blistering account of the film industry, the 1988 Broadway hit is about "Hollywood, but it's more than that," said Lewis.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 4, 1999
What's all the fuss about "The Winslow Boy?" The movie has charmed audiences and most critics since it started its theatrical tour last month, but this viewer was unmoved. Starchy, supercilious, fairly pecked to death by a so many stiff upper lips, "The Winslow Boy" seems notable only for the frisson of the expletive-prone David Mamet directing a G-rated movie.Actually, it's not difficult to see what drew Mamet to "The Winslow Boy," a 1946 play by Terence Rattigan that was adapted for the screen by Anthony Asquith in 1950.
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 3, 1999
David Mamet's "American Buffalo" is a gritty, poetic (though often profane) and explosive play that doesn't quite explode in the Performing Arts Group's production at Howard Community College's Theatre Outback.This three-character drama made Mamet's name when it debuted in the mid-1970s, and it bears many of the Mamet hallmarks: terse language, action-oriented characters, a plot with a scam.In this case, the scam never quite comes off: Things go awry when the ineffective thieves begin to suspect that they are the ones getting taken.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
What a great weekend: HBO sent a screener for "Phil Spector," a made-for-TV movie about the legendary music producer, starring Al Pacino and Helen Mirren. Barry Levinson is the executive producer, with David Mamet as writer and director. That enough talent for you? David Mamet, whose "Glengarry Glen Ross" is made of the same fine angry American genius as Arthur Miller's "Death of a Salesman," and he's writing and directing a Sunday-night made-for-television movie on HBO. Talk to me some more about how TV dumbs down the culture.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | November 17, 2011
The messy emotions in David Mamet's "American Buffalo" find material expression in the 1970s-era junk that fills every messy square foot of a Chicago pawn shop. Some of this clutter even hangs from the front of the stage, as if threatening to spill over into the audience at Centerstage. No thanks for the offer of junk, 'cause we already have enough at home. Thanks, though, for a boisterous production that effectively reflects the urban culture of the decade in which this early Mamet play was written.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
Taped to the side of the counter in the junk shop that forms the set for David Mamet's "American Buffalo" at Center Stage is a vintage sign: "People who advocate violence should be shot. " Most people in the audience will never see that sign, or hundreds of other items crammed on and around the stage to recreate in painstaking detail the 1970s junk shop Mamet specifies. But all of those objects have a part in creating the uncomfortably real world of dark humor and dark prospects for the three edgy characters who animate this theater classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2011
The theme of Center Stage 's 2011-2012 season might be summed up as rhythm — from the distinctive beat of "Jazz," a world premiere adapted from the Toni Morrison novel of that name, to the percussive profanity of David Mamet's "American Buffalo"; from the improvised patter of Second City to the intricate rhymes and melodic pulse of Stephen Sondheim's "Into the Woods. " "We're willing not to play it safe," said Center Stage resident dramaturg Gavin Witt, who helped plan the season with what he described as "a think tank" of senior management.
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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2010
-- The piece wasn't some naked confession about the difficulties of growing up with cerebral palsy. Instead, Hailey Reissman came at her story from the side, with a twist of humor and a touch of the profane. She called it, "I Have Cerebral Palsy and David Mamet Reveals What I Imagine The Friends Of The Guy I Am Dating Will Say When He Tells Them About Me, In Three Brief Monologues." The title encapsulates the wit and inventiveness that so impressed Reissman's professors at Washington College.
FEATURES
November 30, 2007
78 Dick Clark TV producer 60 David Mamet Playwright 52 Billy Idol Singer 42 Ben Stiller Actor 37 Sandra Oh Actress 29 Clay Aiken Singer
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 16, 1997
David Mamet's grim play, "The Cryptogram," should be the dark, flip side of all those cheery 1950s sitcoms. But Fell's Point Corner Theatre's production is almost as bland as 1950s cuisine.Theatergoers familiar with Mamet will notice two unusual things about this 1995 play. First, the virtual absence of profanity, and second, a central character who is a child.Perhaps the most unusual element, however, is that this play about the impact of divorce on a child is the most personal statement yet by the playwright, whose own parents divorced in when he was 10.That's one of the few obvious comments that can be made about this cryptic "Cryptogram."
FEATURES
November 30, 2007
78 Dick Clark TV producer 60 David Mamet Playwright 52 Billy Idol Singer 42 Ben Stiller Actor 37 Sandra Oh Actress 29 Clay Aiken Singer
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | December 3, 2006
The Wicked Son: Anti-Semitism, Self-Hatred and the Jews David Mamet Schocken Books / 189 pages / $19.95 In the late 20th century, according to Pulitzer prize-winning playwright David Mamet, "a laudable disposition to open-mindedness decayed" into "the cant of freedom," with its "corrosive, indeed, destructive" illusions of choice and autonomy. What Allan Bloom called "the closing of the American Mind," Mamet believes is a "sickness," marked by anxiety, purposelessness, loneliness and loss.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2005
Anne Arundel County police are investigating whether a rookie officer was justified in fatally shooting a naked, unarmed man who charged at him Tuesday night from behind an electric utility box in Glen Burnie, a top police official said yesterday. Donald E. Coates, 20, of Glen Burnie died of at least one gunshot wound Tuesday night after failing to surrender to Officer Tommy Pleasant near an Ordnance Road apartment complex, Deputy Chief Emerson Davis said at a news conference. Police officials said witnesses told them that Coates had been using drugs before he fired a half-dozen shots inside the Allen Road townhouse that he shared with his girlfriend, his 1-month-old son and at least three others.
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