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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | March 26, 1991
The folks who run the Annapolis Dinner Theater must be living right.When Cherie Brackett, the star of ADT's "Mame," suddenly became too ill to perform on the show's second weekend, into their laps dropped Jean Anne Kain, a veteran actress who was able to throw herself fully into this wonderful role with a minimum of rehearsal time.The result of her heroic efforts gave everybody's mint julep a kick. When the star returns and a few loose ends are tightened up, the Dinner Theater will have a worthy successor to "Sugar Babies," the naughty burlesque review that kept box office employees jumping for months.
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NEWS
Jacques Kelly | December 10, 2010
Forgive me if I tell this story one more time. I had a flashback the other Sunday morning when my father gave me a lift to the downtown farmers' market in search of the same kind of tree we located many Decembers ago. That specimen stayed green, scented the house and never shed a needle. The hunt began years ago on a Sunday night in December, during a merry visit to my grandmother's Poultney Street rowhouse in the neighborhood we call Federal Hill today. In the mid-1960s, it was just plain South Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Pat Shipley Hook and Pat Shipley Hook,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 20, 1996
The Chesapeake Music Hall's production of "Mame" deserves great acclaim.For a ma-and-pa troupe to come up with a production as good as this one is miraculous. And much of the miracle work is done by Sherry Kay, who not only plays the title role with aplomb but also is co-producer, choreographer and costumer.Kay's Mame shows softness as well as strength. She is gorgeous in stunning gowns and the other costumes, and dance numbers are impressive.Based on the novel "Auntie Mame" by Patrick Dennis, the show tells the story of a 10-year-old boy sent to live with an aunt whose idea of child-rearing includes teaching youngsters to mix martinis and dance the tango in a speakeasy.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | May 3, 2009
I had never seen Bea Arthur on the stage until 1966, when I was sitting in the audience at the Winter Garden Theatre in New York City listening to the orchestra warm up and waiting for the curtain to rise on the Broadway musical Mame, which had opened that May to rave reviews. Arthur was playing boozy actress and sidekick Vera Charles to Angela Lansbury's Mame, and no one has ever played that role better. First off, what added luster to the character of Vera Charles was Arthur's interpretation, much enlivened by a distinctively husky voice that sounded like a cross between a basso profundo steam whistle off the liner Q ueen Mary and a Nantucket foghorn.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley and J. Wynn Rousuck and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
Mame is about a larger-than-life woman, and the musical itself is a large-scale affair. Cockpit in Court's production is directed and choreographed by Todd Pearthree, who has a proven ability for gracefully navigating sizable casts. And it stars Shannon Wollman, who has played her share of imposing dames, from Fanny Brice to Eva Peron. In Mame (score by Jerry Herman; book by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee), Wollman gets to strut her stuff as an indomitable, free-spirited 1920s New Yorker, and she takes to it with gusto.
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2005
In 1955, novelist Patrick Dennis created a character that was a mixture of his vivacious, stylish mother and his eccentric, bohemian Aunt Marion. The composite personality enchanted the public, inspiring a play and a movie, both like the book titled Auntie Mame, a musical called Mame that chalked up 1,508 performances on Broadway and toured for years, and a movie musical. Now running at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia, Mame opens at the height of the 1920s. Patrick, an orphaned 10-year-old boy, seeks his aunt's fashionable apartment in Manhattan.
NEWS
August 11, 1996
September Song, the community theater group that produces a play every fall to benefit the developmentally disabled, has picked its cast for the 1996 play, the classic story of "Mame."The play will be produced this year by Joan Crooks, who succeeds longtime producer Arnie Hayes. Hal Fox will direct, Ken Berry and Joan Eichhorn will assist, Lois Powelson will provide choreography and Phillip Hale the music.Cast members and their character are: Ann Barcroft, Mame Dennis; Beverly Wells, Vera Charles; Ken Berry, Beauregard J. P. Burnside; Justin Barcroft, young Patrick; Chuck Lambert, older Patrick; Katy Hale, Agnes Gooch; Hal Fox, Dwight Babcock; Harry Langmead, M. Lindsay Woolsey; Edith Burbage, Sally Cato; Jeremy Gill, Ito; Kristen Bolster, Pegeen Ryan; Bob Miller, Mr. Upson; Sandy Eichler, Mrs. Upson; Diana Schmidt, Gloria Upson; Brian Sirman, Junior Babcock; Jimmy Phillips, Peter Dennis; Richard Schmidt, Ralph Devine; Ruth Snow, Madam Branislowski; Cheryl Wilson, Mother Burnside; Dougg Blackiston, Gregor; Monica Walsh, Cousin Fan.Featured dancers include: Delynn Powelson, Nikki Jackson, Trish Szymanski, Kristen Bolster, Susan Tabasko, Frances Cullison, Jane Schultz, Heather Hahn, Rachael Tittle.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 21, 2006
With unabashed pride, Christine Baranski shows off the program from one of her past theatrical triumphs. It isn't the Playbill from Tom Stoppard's The Real Thing or Neil Simon's Rumors (in both of which she won Tony Awards). Instead, it's a pale green, photocopied program from the 1970 high school musical at Villa Maria Academy in Cheektowaga, N.Y., a Buffalo suburb. MAME / / May 27-July 2 / / Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, Northwest Washington / / 800-444-1324 Christine Baranski Born: May 2, 1952, in Buffalo, N.Y. Education: The Juilliard School, bachelor's degree, 1974 Career highlights: Theater - A Midsummer Night's Dream (New York Shakespeare Festival, 1982 Obie Award)
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 4, 2006
"Open a new window" is the guiding philosophy of free-spirited Mame in the musical that bears her name. But that philosophy doesn't fully apply to the new revival at Washington's Kennedy Center. Large in scale (the cast numbers more than 30) and stylish in design (with Art Deco-flavored sets by Walt Spangler and 250 sparkling costumes by Gregg Barnes), director Eric Schaeffer's Mame is more of a reverential retelling than an inspired reinterpretation of the 1966 musical. MAME / / Through July 2 -- Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, N.W., Washington -- 800-444-1324
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 1996
THE CAST AND crew of September Song, a benefit show produced each year during the last two weeks of September, have gained a reputation as one of the finest community theater groups in the area.This month, the volunteer troupe will present the musical "Mame" in the Westminster High School auditorium, showcasing some fine local talents, and a new producer, Joan Crooks of Uniontown."This show is a benefit," she says. "The people who come to these shows are donating to the developmentally disabled of this county.
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 4, 2006
"Open a new window" is the guiding philosophy of free-spirited Mame in the musical that bears her name. But that philosophy doesn't fully apply to the new revival at Washington's Kennedy Center. Large in scale (the cast numbers more than 30) and stylish in design (with Art Deco-flavored sets by Walt Spangler and 250 sparkling costumes by Gregg Barnes), director Eric Schaeffer's Mame is more of a reverential retelling than an inspired reinterpretation of the 1966 musical. MAME / / Through July 2 -- Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, N.W., Washington -- 800-444-1324
NEWS
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 21, 2006
With unabashed pride, Christine Baranski shows off the program from one of her past theatrical triumphs. It isn't the Playbill from Tom Stoppard's The Real Thing or Neil Simon's Rumors (in both of which she won Tony Awards). Instead, it's a pale green, photocopied program from the 1970 high school musical at Villa Maria Academy in Cheektowaga, N.Y., a Buffalo suburb. MAME / / May 27-July 2 / / Kennedy Center, Virginia and New Hampshire avenues, Northwest Washington / / 800-444-1324 Christine Baranski Born: May 2, 1952, in Buffalo, N.Y. Education: The Juilliard School, bachelor's degree, 1974 Career highlights: Theater - A Midsummer Night's Dream (New York Shakespeare Festival, 1982 Obie Award)
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2005
In 1955, novelist Patrick Dennis created a character that was a mixture of his vivacious, stylish mother and his eccentric, bohemian Aunt Marion. The composite personality enchanted the public, inspiring a play and a movie, both like the book titled Auntie Mame, a musical called Mame that chalked up 1,508 performances on Broadway and toured for years, and a movie musical. Now running at Toby's Dinner Theatre in Columbia, Mame opens at the height of the 1920s. Patrick, an orphaned 10-year-old boy, seeks his aunt's fashionable apartment in Manhattan.
FEATURES
By EDWARD GUNTS and EDWARD GUNTS,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | October 24, 2005
Downtown Baltimore is bustling with redevelopment activity these days, from the Ritz Carlton condominiums along Key Highway to new shops on Charles Street and apartments on the west side. But there was a time when it seemed practically impossible to attract people to the city - and Baltimore faced municipal bankruptcy if it didn't take action. The story of the city's campaign to revitalize itself is told through words and photographs in an exhibit that has been mounted in one of the structures where the rebuilding began.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 23, 2004
Venturing a half-mile outside Anne Arundel County - about five minutes from Crofton - leads to Bowie Playhouse, hidden in the woods of Whitemarsh Park. This functional theater boasts a large, high stage that accommodates rapid set changes, a full orchestra pit and comfortable seating for 150. Here, full-fledged productions are mounted by top-notch technicians to showcase first-rate, on-stage talent. The combination wins prestigious awards for 2nd Star Productions and Bowie Community Theatre - the two companies at Bowie Playhouse.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
A show that opens with award-winning potential is a rarity, but 2nd Star Productions' Mame seemed a winner at its debut last weekend at Bowie Playhouse in Whitemarsh Park. In 1957, a script by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee brought Patrick Dennis' autobiographical novel to theater with a memorable score by Jerry Herman. They tell the story of orphaned, 10-year-old Patrick, who goes to live with his aunt after the death of his father. Auntie Mame holds parties awash in bathtub gin, savoring the Roaring Twenties in her Manhattan apartment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1998
Digging for digital nostalgia?Thanks to a small band of techies, you can transform your desktop into a state-of-the-old video game. On the Web, you'll find re-creations of titles ranging from coin-op classics such as Tempest and Defender to Atari 2600 home videogame hits such as Pitfall.Unfortunately, making this work isn't as simple as popping a disk into your drive and clicking "Setup." It's more like buying a desk at IKEA: some assembly required.First, download a program called an "emulator," the best of which are MAME and Retrocade.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 1999
The Chesapeake Music Hall took its 15-member cast of singing and dancing actors and a sound and light crew on the road Saturday to do excerpts from a dozen Broadway shows for the Performing Arts Association of Linthicum, and PAAL never looked or sounded better.That's at least partly the work of lighting and sound designer Garrett Hyde, technician Karel Richardson and light man Greg Guthman, who turned the auditorium at North County High School into a cabaret for this show.Music hall owner, general manager, director, choreographer and costumer Sherry Kay provided costumes for "Mame," "Annie Get Your Gun," "South Pacific," "Oklahoma," "Fiddler on the Roof," "Damn Yankees," "Little Shop of Horrors" and "42nd Street" and assisted with split-second changes.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
A show that opens with award-winning potential is a rarity, but 2nd Star Productions' Mame seemed a winner at its debut last weekend at Bowie Playhouse in Whitemarsh Park. In 1957, a script by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee brought Patrick Dennis' autobiographical novel to theater with a memorable score by Jerry Herman. They tell the story of orphaned, 10-year-old Patrick, who goes to live with his aunt after the death of his father. Auntie Mame holds parties awash in bathtub gin, savoring the Roaring Twenties in her Manhattan apartment.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2003
With the current production of The Best of Broadway - Gotta Sing, Gotta Dance, Sherry Kay Anderson celebrates her eighth anniversary as owner of Chesapeake Music Hall, the only dinner theater in Annapolis. The multitalented Anderson again directs, produces, choreographs, designs and creates costumes and decorates sets while often serving as chef for this second annual "Best of" production. She also finds that she's "gotta sing and dance," lighting up the stage as she re-creates her roles as Mame and Gypsy's Mama Rose.
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