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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | October 11, 2006
ROCKVILLE -- Attorneys for Washington-area sniper Lee Boyd Malvo, who pleaded guilty yesterday to six murders in Montgomery County, are trying to forge a wide agreement that would have him also admit his role in other 2002 shootings in other states. The deal has the potential to give Malvo what he reportedly wants -- a move from Virginia's Red Onion prison to a federal penitentiary -- if it includes a plea to the fatal shooting in Washington, D.C., to which he and John Allen Muhammad have been linked.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2010
Lee Boyd Malvo is claiming that he and fellow Beltway sniper John Allen Muhammad lined up co-conspirators to broaden the campaign of violence that paralyzed the Washington region eight years ago, but that the collaborators backed away, according to a television interview. Malvo also claimed responsibility for 42 shootings, many more than he and Muhammad had been linked to, according to a forensic psychiatrist who interviewed the man, now 25. The revelations were greeted skeptically by lawyers involved in the case that shook the region in 2002.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
A federal judge in Baltimore indicated yesterday that he would make public much of the sealed juvenile record of sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo. Meanwhile, the 17-year-old's Virginia lawyers are expected to ask a judge today for permission to hire, in secret, expert witnesses for his state murder trial. In Baltimore, U.S. Magistrate Judge James K. Bredar signaled during a hearing yesterday that he was willing to grant a request by The Sun and three other news organizations to unseal juvenile records involving Malvo in the first weeks after his arrest.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Andrea F. Siegel and Dan Lamothe and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Reporters | April 21, 2007
A Web site that peddles the personal effects of notorious killers has posted for sale a drawing of Osama bin Laden said to be the work of Lee Boyd Malvo, prompting outrage from the families of victims in the 2002 sniper shootings near Washington. The drawing, a cartoonish, black-and-white sketch on a rumpled sheet of paper, appears to depict bin Laden, a shaggy beard falling down his chest. It was posted April 14 on an eBay-like auction site called "murderauc tion.com" by a seller known only as "Redrum," the word "murder" spelled backward.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Andrea F. Siegel and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2003
CHESAPEAKE, Va. - Offering a sinister description of the teen-age half of an alleged killing team, a Virginia prosecutor told jurors yesterday that Lee Boyd Malvo knew exactly what he was doing when he gunned down one victim after another in last fall's murderous rampage. "They didn't just willy-nilly go to places and shoot," Fairfax County Commonwealth's Attorney Robert F. Horan Jr. said in opening statements of Malvo's trial. "There is no way in the world he doesn't know what he did, how he did it and why he did it."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
Lawyers for teen-age sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo challenged yesterday events that culminated in the youth's six-hour police interrogation last November, in which Malvo allegedly boasted about fatally shooting several people in the Washington area. In a 38-page document filed yesterday asking a Fairfax County, Va., Circuit Court judge to throw out Malvo's statement, the defense details a chronology contending that officials whisked Malvo out of Baltimore on Nov. 7, dropped federal charges against him in federal court in Greenbelt, and brought him to Fairfax County.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - The witness identification is nearly perfect. The suspect is paraded into the courtroom in an orange jumpsuit, and, after a few moments of examination, the man on the witness stand cries out, "That's him!" But there's one small twist - the suspect being positively identified as the killer is not the man on trial for murder. The man on trial is John Allen Muhammad, 42, charged in the 13 sniper shootings that terrorized the Washington region last fall. The suspect identified as the killer is Lee Boyd Malvo, 18, who is awaiting trial for his role in the shootings.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 25, 2003
FAIRFAX, Va. - Teen-age sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo told Supermax jailers that he intended to shoot a pregnant woman at a Baltimore cemetery and a city police officer, correctional officers testified yesterday, offering fresh details about the activities of the two suspects accused of terrifying the Baltimore to Richmond corridor with random shootings last fall. Malvo also confessed to other shootings, telling the officers that he shot a Bowie middle-schooler to upset Montgomery County Police Chief Charles Moose because "when a man is upset he can't think straight," and claimed it "worked" because Moose cried on television, Cpl. Wayne Davis testified.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 3, 2003
A Fairfax County, Va., judge ruled yesterday that jurors may hear testimony from two Supermax prison officers who say that teen-age sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo bragged to them about killings, shootings and other near-attacks after he was arrested last fall. At a hearing in July, the correctional officers testified that two days after his arrest Oct. 24, Malvo, then 17, began revealing details about the random shootings that gripped the Baltimore-to-Richmond, Va., corridor during three weeks in October.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 22, 2002
CENTREVILLE, Va. - In the nearly two months since the sniper attacks in the Washington area ended with the arrests of John Allen Muhammad and his teen-age protege, Lee Boyd Malvo, investigators say they have made a striking conclusion: All the evidence they have points to Malvo, 17, as the trigger man. Little if any indicates that Muhammad fired a shot. Officials who have reviewed the evidence at the sniper task force's new headquarters here in suburban Virginia say that the lack of evidence against Muhammad will complicate prosecutors' efforts to get a death sentence for him in the shooting of Dean Harold Meyers, who was killed at a gas station in Manassas on Oct. 9. After the two men were arrested Oct. 24, it was widely assumed, even by investigators, that Muhammad fired most of the shots, which hit their targets with remarkable accuracy.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | November 9, 2006
ROCKVILLE -- A tearful Lee Boyd Malvo told a Montgomery County courtroom yesterday that he was ashamed of his role in the sniper rampage that terrorized the Washington area in 2002 and claimed six lives in the suburban county, and that he'll never be able to forgive himself. "I am truly sorry, grieved and ashamed of what I have done to the families and friends" of the six victims, said Malvo, sniffling as he read the names. Circuit Judge James L. Ryan then sentenced Malvo, now 21, to six consecutive life terms in prison, one for each person that he and John Allen Muhammad were convicted of killing in Montgomery County.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | October 11, 2006
ROCKVILLE -- Attorneys for Washington-area sniper Lee Boyd Malvo, who pleaded guilty yesterday to six murders in Montgomery County, are trying to forge a wide agreement that would have him also admit his role in other 2002 shootings in other states. The deal has the potential to give Malvo what he reportedly wants -- a move from Virginia's Red Onion prison to a federal penitentiary -- if it includes a plea to the fatal shooting in Washington, D.C., to which he and John Allen Muhammad have been linked.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Sun reporter | June 20, 2006
The Virginia prosecutors of snipers Lee Boyd Malvo and John Allen Muhammad say they oppose allowing Malvo to serve his life sentence in a federal prison as part of any far-reaching plea agreement, as has been suggested in recent months. Muhammad, 45, on death row in Virginia for a sniper murder, was convicted in May of six fatal sniper shootings in Montgomery County in 2002. He received six life terms without parole. Malvo, 21, serving multiple life sentences for Virginia sniper shootings, had not spoken publicly about the crimes until Muhammad's trial.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2006
He was getting ready to tee off at the seventh hole of a Clearwater, Fla., golf course when he heard the bang. "I thought I first got hit by a golf ball. Then we saw the blood gush out of my shirt, and we knew I got shot," Albert S. Michalczyk recalled about the May 18, 2002 shooting. The Tucson, Ariz., retiree had "no idea" why anyone would want to target him, he said in an interview yesterday. But that shooting may be among four more attacks that admitted sniper Lee Boyd Malvo told police that he and convicted murderer John Allen Muhammad committed before their rampage in the Washington area that claimed 10 lives, according to The Washington Post.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
John Allen Muhammad's conviction in Montgomery County clears the way for murder trials in other jurisdictions where bullets from the sniper's gun allegedly claimed victims - including Louisiana, Alabama and the District of Columbia. But officials in Virginia, where Muhammad is expected to return soon to await execution for killing a man in Prince William County, said they see little point in further trials. It would require the agreement of Virginia's governor to release Muhammad to the custody of another state to stand trial.
NEWS
By ANDREA F. SIEGEL and ANDREA F. SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | May 31, 2006
ROCKVILLE -- John Allen Muhammad was convicted yesterday of murder in the 2002 sniper rampage that killed six people in Montgomery County, ending a trial in which his claim of being framed was eclipsed by his protege's riveting portrayal of Muhammad as the creator of a scheme to terrorize the nation. The verdict gave victims' families a sense of justice they have sought since Muhammad, 45, and his admitted acolyte Lee Boyd Malvo, 21, were arrested 3 1/2 years ago - even though the decision to try a man already on Virginia's death row remained controversial.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 3, 2003
Worried that teen-age sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo couldn't receive a fair trial in Northern Virginia, a Fairfax County judge moved it yesterday to the waterfront community of Chesapeake, 200 miles south of where most of the Washington-area sniper shootings took place. In her ruling, Fairfax County Circuit Judge Jane Marum Roush wrote that the trial "should be transferred to a jurisdiction outside of the Washington/Richmond corridor, where many citizens lived in fear during the month of October 2002 as a result of the crimes with which the defendant is charged."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
A Virginia judge gave prosecutors a small victory yesterday over sniper suspect Lee Boyd Malvo, allowing the teen-ager's court-appointed guardian to stay on the capital murder case but stripping him of most of his authority and rejecting his bid for criminal investigative records. Lawyer Todd G. Petit said the ruling leaves him no way to demand school, medical and other records on his client for a report for the Fairfax County Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court to consider before Malvo's Jan. 14 preliminary hearing.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2006
Testimony that the alleged Washington-area snipers had plans to shoot and bomb school buses and other targets in Baltimore, had they not been caught, prompted a ripple of emotions around the area yesterday. "When I heard the news, it was very alarming to me because we are all about safety," said Tony Bennett, who manages operations for two First Student Inc. lots from which school buses are dispatched to carry students in the city and Baltimore and Howard counties. "It's very troubling."
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