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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
In advance of National Grammar Day, Mignon Fogarty (Grammar Girl!) reposted her "Top Ten Grammar Myths. " One of the responses was from Renee Schuls-Jacobson, in an ill-informed comment* that contained a blunder in grammar . Ms. Schuls-Jacobson described herself as an English professor, and, indeed, she appears to teach composition at Monroe Community College in New York. In 2009, appearing on Dan Rodricks's Midday show to talk about grammar, I got note from Margaret Benner of the writing support program at Towson University disputing my use of discretionary commas . It was so weirdly out there that the usually unflappable Jan freeman was moved to comment: "It is so very depressing to hear that a college writing teacher actually believes that is a 'rule.' I don't even think it's the preferable option; I would use the commas in both sample sentences, and I've spent my career as an editor and a student of English usage.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 15, 2014
In his letter to the editor ( "Hogan: Hobby Lobby case a manufactured political issue in Md. governor's race," July 8), Republican gubernatorial nominee Larry Hogan complains that "the number of OB-GYNs in our state continues to drop; in fact three counties in Maryland lack a single OB-GYN practitioner, and 11 counties now have fewer than two. " Assuming that Mr. Hogan is correct in these numbers, women in Maryland enjoy access to specialized health...
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NEWS
June 29, 2012
The recent $55 million jury verdict against Johns Hopkins Hospital is a malpractice outrage, praised by lawyers, as usual, smacking their lips for more of the same ("Waverly family awarded $55 million in lawsuit," June 27). From the article in The Sun, I understand that the Waverly couple, awarded this large sum, Rebecca Fielding and Enso Martinez, waited for hours at home, with Rebecca in futile labor, until they saw the light all of a sudden and ran to Hopkins for rescue. Somehow, as per Mr. Martinez, the obstetrics department at Hopkins was not on its toes to save his child from oxygen deprivation and its attendant complications.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
A popular midwife practice whose partnership with Mercy Medical Center is ending because of rising malpractice costs has found a new home at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. Kathleen Slone CNM & Associates will move to new offices on York Road this week and begin taking patients June 23. Mercy told the midwives in October it was severing ties after two high-profile medical malpractice cases, though unrelated directly to the hospital, had driven up the cost of insurance and that it was looking for ways to alleviate the financial pressure.
NEWS
February 8, 2010
M aryland dodged a proverbial bullet last month when the Court of Appeals upheld the state's long-standing cap on noneconomic damages in most medical liability cases. The ruling allows some control over large damage awards that can drive up the cost of health care. But that's hardly cause for celebration. Medical malpractice litigation is still an area that operates as a kind of high-stakes lottery where patients and medical practitioners alike win or lose on the most capricious of circumstances - actual injury and physician malpractice not always proving to be significant factors.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
After hours of labor, Enso Martinez cried as his wife, Rebecca Fielding, was carried from their Waverly home on a stretcher en route to Johns Hopkins Hospital. Fielding, who had wanted to deliver her baby at home with the help of a midwife, assured her husband that everything would be OK. But she never expected to wait more than two hours for an emergency Caesarean section after being rushed to the hospital by ambulance that morning in March 2010. If a team of doctors and nurses had performed the surgery earlier, Martinez and Fielding contend, their son, Enzo, would now be a normal 2-year-old boy practicing new words and toddling across the floor.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2012
When a jury ordered Johns Hopkins Hospital to pay $55 million to a Baltimore family whose newborn was brain-damaged, the case hinged on what doctors and nurses did in the two hours before birth. But the jury never heard about the nurse midwife trying to deliver the baby at home during the half-day before the mother arrived by ambulance at the emergency room because of what court documents called "fetal distress. " Evelyn Muhlhan's license was suspended by the Maryland Board of Nursing for her alleged actions during that delivery and four other home deliveries over three years.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A prominent Baltimore businessman said he lost millions of dollars when he chose to retire early after being led to believe he suffered from severe coronary disease. Glenn Weinberg, a former partner of the Baltimore-based Cordish Co., said he retired after three stents were placed in his heart at St. Joseph Medical Center by former cardiologist Mark Midei. But attorneys for Midei and the hospital's former owners said the stents were necessary and meant to improve the plaintiff's health so he could carry on normal activities, such as his career.
NEWS
By Wayne M. Willoughby | February 27, 2009
Legislation under consideration in the General Assembly would restore equal protection under the law and basic fairness for the victims of medical negligence in Maryland. Sponsored by 11 of the 22 members of the House Judiciary Committee, including the chairman, House Bill 237 has strong support. Unfortunately, opponents of the bill (including this newspaper) have continued to regurgitate insurance company talking points, reinforcing the fact that the current law protects corporate profits and does little to protect patients.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | November 6, 2002
HOW IS IT that Maryland, home of Angelos, Saiontz, Kirk, Miles and 39 members of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum, which calls itself "the most prestigious group of trial lawyers in the United States," has avoided the malpractice-insurance blowup? Decent government, smart doctors and responsible insurance executives. To be more precise, Maryland owes its relatively favorable malpractice-insurance outcome to the fact that it has avoided, intentionally or not, imitating New Jersey. New Jersey is one of a dozen states that the American Medical Association claims is in malpractice-coverage "crisis."
NEWS
March 20, 2014
I wonder why letter writer S. R. Cohen is so quick to attack neurosurgeon Ben Carson when he seems so unaware of Mr. Carson's beliefs ( "Ben Carson commits 'values malpractice,'" March 16). One would have to look far and wide to find anyone with greater moral clarity or finer track record than Dr. Carson. Dr. Carson is not against universal health care; he just knows there are ways to do it that shouldn't involve throwing the country over a fiscal cliff, after which there will be no benefits for anyone.
NEWS
March 16, 2014
If neurosurgeon Ben Carson practiced medicine the way he practices politics, the "M.D. " after his name would stand for "Malpractice Defendant. " Every physician takes the Hippocratic Oath to "do no harm. " To oppose universal health care for Americans - as embodied in the Affordable Care Act - is on its face a violation of that oath. It constitutes, in short, "values malpractice" - a charge that applies not only to him but also to Congressional ACA opponents such as Dr. Rand Paul and Dr. Andy Harris.
NEWS
March 14, 2014
The editorial "More study needed on birth injury bill" (March 12) supports the creation of a "task force" to study the implementation of a "new" system for handling medical negligence cases involving birth-related neurological injuries, similar to a program in Virginia. The idea of studying the Virginia program here in Maryland is far from new. Bills to create such a task force were introduced - and failed to garner support - in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. Del. Dan K. Morhaim, the doctor-legislator leading the current effort, was a lead sponsor of three of the four previously-introduced bills.
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh and Dan K. Morhaim | March 10, 2014
This summer, Gov. Martin O'Malley and public health leaders justly celebrated the fact that infant mortality in our state has been driven to a new record low. By increasing access to care and outreach for new mothers and their babies - particularly in low-income communities - Maryland's infant mortality rate fell by 21 percent between 2008 and 2012. This is a tremendous achievement. But this hard won progress - as well as access for all expectant mothers - is at risk as we confront a looming obstetrics crisis: multi-million dollar medical malpractice judgments that are driving even higher the already high cost of medical liability.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Prompted by recent multimillion-dollar medical malpractice judgments, Maryland lawmakers are pushing to create a fund to help pay for treating babies who suffer neurological injuries during birth. Proposed legislation calls for hospitals and doctors with obstetrics and gynecological practices, as well as malpractice insurers, to pay annual fees to the birth injury fund, which families could tap to pay medical bills, recoup lost earnings potential and cover other costs. Virginia, Florida and New York are the only states with such funds.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Though a Baltimore County jury agreed that former cardiologist Mark Midei placed stents in Glenn Weinberg's heart unnecessarily, one juror said panel members did not all agree that the procedure caused the prominent businessman to miss out on a stake in Maryland's largest casino. "It was hard to prove that the main factor of him missing out on Maryland Live was the placement of the stents," said Eric D. Goodman, who was juror No. 7 during the six-week trial. Weinberg was an executive with the Cordish Cos., which took on the Anne Arundel County casino project while he was recuperating.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A prominent Baltimore businessman said he lost millions of dollars when he chose to retire early after being led to believe he suffered from severe coronary disease. Glenn Weinberg, a former partner of the Baltimore-based Cordish Co., said he retired after three stents were placed in his heart at St. Joseph Medical Center by former cardiologist Mark Midei. But attorneys for Midei and the hospital's former owners said the stents were necessary and meant to improve the plaintiff's health so he could carry on normal activities, such as his career.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals overturned a multimillion-dollar judgment against Johns Hopkins Hospital in a case that accused its doctors of causing severe and irreversible brain damage to a baby born at the hospital. The judges ordered the case sent back to a lower court for retrial. They ruled that Hopkins should have been allowed to give more testimony about the role a midwife might have played in the baby's injuries. Attorneys for the baby's family said Wednesday that they will appeal the decision to the Court of Appeals, the state's highest court.
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