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Malnutrition

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Jay Hancock | November 7, 2011
It looked like a public health emergency. Hundreds of patients checking into Kernan Hospital were getting diagnosed with a severe form of malnutrition called kwashiorkor. Taking its name from a Ghanian word, kwashiorkor is typically seen in children and is marked by swollen feet, a swollen stomach and skin ulcers. It's common in Africa and developing nations elsewhere but is hardly heard of in the United States. But by 2008, according to records obtained from state regulators, the West Baltimore orthopedic hospital was diagnosing one in every eight patients with the disease that helps define famines in Somalia or Bangladesh.
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
A child was found alone in a motel room in Towson Thursday morning around 8:30 a.m. The child, a 6-year-old male was taken to a hospital to be treated for severe malnutrition and was still in the hospital as of Friday afternoon. It is unknown when the child will be released. Baltimore County Police have identified the child's parents but no charges have been filed. The state's attorney will determine whether the parents will be charged after the Crimes Against Children Unit has thoroughly investigated the case, police said.
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
A child was found alone in a motel room in Towson Thursday morning around 8:30 a.m. The child, a 6-year-old male was taken to a hospital to be treated for severe malnutrition and was still in the hospital as of Friday afternoon. It is unknown when the child will be released. Baltimore County Police have identified the child's parents but no charges have been filed. The state's attorney will determine whether the parents will be charged after the Crimes Against Children Unit has thoroughly investigated the case, police said.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | November 7, 2011
It looked like a public health emergency. Hundreds of patients checking into Kernan Hospital were getting diagnosed with a severe form of malnutrition called kwashiorkor. Taking its name from a Ghanian word, kwashiorkor is typically seen in children and is marked by swollen feet, a swollen stomach and skin ulcers. It's common in Africa and developing nations elsewhere but is hardly heard of in the United States. But by 2008, according to records obtained from state regulators, the West Baltimore orthopedic hospital was diagnosing one in every eight patients with the disease that helps define famines in Somalia or Bangladesh.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | December 10, 1992
The photos of tiny children, with bellies swollen and arms an legs pathetically thin, show the misery of Somalia. What they can't show is that many, even with emergency help, will be forever scarred by the famine that grips their country.Aid workers say 300,000 people have died so far; the total could reach 500,000 by the end of the year.Relief agencies are feeding 3.2 million people a day, but a third of the population of 6 million remains threatened by starvation. And the youngest generation -- children under 5 -- could be wiped out in some places.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 17, 2007
Dr. George Gordon Graham, an internationally acclaimed authority on malnutrition in infants and children and founding director of the division of human nutrition in the department of international health at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, died of respiratory failure Sunday at his Gibson Island home. He was 83. Born the son of a banker in Hackensack, N.J., Dr. Graham was 4 when he moved to San Juan, Puerto Rico. When he was 14, he left San Juan, and entered the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1941.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 14, 2004
YANJI, China - At 16, Myung Bok is old enough to join the North Korean army. But you wouldn't believe it from his appearance. The teen-ager stands 4-foot-7, the height of an American fifth- or sixth-grader. Myung Bok escaped the Communist North last summer to join his mother and younger sisters, who had fled to China earlier. When he arrived, 14-year-old sister Eun Hang did not recognize the scrawny little kid walking up the dirt path to their cottage in a village near the North Korean border.
NEWS
By Cyril O. Enwonwu | July 5, 2009
A report released last week shows that obesity is harming the health of millions of Americans, including children and teens. The report, "F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies are Failing in America 2009," from the Trust for America's Health, says that 28.8 percent of Maryland youths ages 10 to 17 are overweight or obese - and thus at increased risk of a long list of chronic health problems such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis and some cancers....
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
The federal government has filed a lawsuit against Kernan Hospital seeking $8.1 million because of what is says was improper billing to the Medicare and Medicaid system. The lawsuit filed by the Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Defense accuses the rehabilitation hospital in Baltimore of falsely manipulating its computerized billing system so that it looked like patients had a severe form of malnutrition called kwashiorkor. Hospitals are compensated more for a patient who has a more severe and complex diagnosis.
FEATURES
July 29, 1999
Our favorite new bracelet isn't made of sterling silver. Dainty charms don't dangle prettily from it; there are no jewels to catch the light. The Bracelet of Life is just a strip of paper -- but it sure catches attention.Its colored zones make it a handy tool for doctors helping out in global crises, from droughts to civil wars. Here's how it works:Doctors slip a bracelet on a child's arm and quickly see how close that child is to starving. Wrap the bracelet around the arm of a well-nourished child, slip the tab through its slot and pull, and the tab stops on the green zone.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
The federal government has filed a lawsuit against Kernan Hospital seeking $8.1 million because of what is says was improper billing to the Medicare and Medicaid system. The lawsuit filed by the Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Defense accuses the rehabilitation hospital in Baltimore of falsely manipulating its computerized billing system so that it looked like patients had a severe form of malnutrition called kwashiorkor. Hospitals are compensated more for a patient who has a more severe and complex diagnosis.
NEWS
By Cyril O. Enwonwu | July 5, 2009
A report released last week shows that obesity is harming the health of millions of Americans, including children and teens. The report, "F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies are Failing in America 2009," from the Trust for America's Health, says that 28.8 percent of Maryland youths ages 10 to 17 are overweight or obese - and thus at increased risk of a long list of chronic health problems such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis and some cancers....
NEWS
July 18, 2008
In the developing countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America, it's relatively easy to spot the youngsters suffering from malnutrition. They're the ones with the glassy eyes, toothpick arms and legs, and rags for clothing. But in Baltimore, hunger presents a different face: an overweight adolescent in T-shirt and jeans, or a sickly infant who turns up repeatedly in hospital emergency rooms. City health officials are taking the problem of malnutrition seriously, as food and fuel prices soar and more families lose homes and jobs.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Reporter | July 16, 2008
Nearly one in eight families taking children to the University of Maryland Medical Center's emergency room and primary care clinic lack enough food to ensure good nutrition - putting the youngsters at risk for growth and learning problems, a study has found. Acting on the finding, the city health department yesterday announced a plan to screen children for signs of hunger and to link families to food pantries and federal nutrition programs such as food stamps and Women Infants and Children.
NEWS
September 1, 2007
O'Malley defends reasons for firing Gov. Martin O'Malley rebutted yesterday a former state worker's claims that he was fired for political reasons. Nelson Reichart, the former head of real estate for the Department of General Services, filed suit this week, contending that he was terminated in a purge of white Republicans from the agency. Reichart also said his firing was in retaliation for comments he made to The Sun about a Queen Anne's County land deal. The governor said privacy protections in personnel law prevent him from going into detail about the firing, but he said Reichart's accusations are untrue.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 17, 2007
Dr. George Gordon Graham, an internationally acclaimed authority on malnutrition in infants and children and founding director of the division of human nutrition in the department of international health at what is now the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, died of respiratory failure Sunday at his Gibson Island home. He was 83. Born the son of a banker in Hackensack, N.J., Dr. Graham was 4 when he moved to San Juan, Puerto Rico. When he was 14, he left San Juan, and entered the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1941.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D | May 7, 1991
Most doctors in America do not recognize malnutrition as an underlying factor in disease.But last month, more than 90 specialists in health, aging and nutrition met in Washington to discuss nutrition-related problems among older Americans.Earlier studies have shown that people who are somewhat malnourished get sick more often than those who are well-nourished. When hospitalized, they stay three to five days longer and are more likely to have complications. Consequently, their health care costs are much higher.
NEWS
July 18, 2008
In the developing countries of Africa, Asia and Latin America, it's relatively easy to spot the youngsters suffering from malnutrition. They're the ones with the glassy eyes, toothpick arms and legs, and rags for clothing. But in Baltimore, hunger presents a different face: an overweight adolescent in T-shirt and jeans, or a sickly infant who turns up repeatedly in hospital emergency rooms. City health officials are taking the problem of malnutrition seriously, as food and fuel prices soar and more families lose homes and jobs.
NEWS
By SOLOMON MOORE and SOLOMON MOORE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 14, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- One in four Iraqi children suffers from chronic malnutrition, as poor security and poverty take their toll on the youngest generation, health and aid workers said yesterday. The situation is worse in remote rural areas, where as many as one in three children suffers from problems associated with poor diet such as stunted growth and low weight, according to a recent government report that surveyed 22,050 households in 98 districts around the nation. "This can irreversibly hamper the young child's optimal mental and cognitive development, not just their physical development," said Roger Wright, the special representative in Iraq for the U.N. Children's Fund, or UNICEF, which provided support for the interagency report.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 14, 2004
YANJI, China - At 16, Myung Bok is old enough to join the North Korean army. But you wouldn't believe it from his appearance. The teen-ager stands 4-foot-7, the height of an American fifth- or sixth-grader. Myung Bok escaped the Communist North last summer to join his mother and younger sisters, who had fled to China earlier. When he arrived, 14-year-old sister Eun Hang did not recognize the scrawny little kid walking up the dirt path to their cottage in a village near the North Korean border.
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