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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 29, 2013
 MedStar Harbor Hospital is the new home to a family of Mallards. Ten baby mallards hatched from eggs today in the courtyard of the South Baltimore hospital where their mom sought refuge a couple of weeks ago. The mother had been very protective of her babies and hospital staff couldn't even get close enough to see how many eggs were in her nest until they hatched, said hospital spokeswoman Debra Schindler. The daddy mallard could be seen today bringing the babies food, Schindler said.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 29, 2013
 MedStar Harbor Hospital is the new home to a family of Mallards. Ten baby mallards hatched from eggs today in the courtyard of the South Baltimore hospital where their mom sought refuge a couple of weeks ago. The mother had been very protective of her babies and hospital staff couldn't even get close enough to see how many eggs were in her nest until they hatched, said hospital spokeswoman Debra Schindler. The daddy mallard could be seen today bringing the babies food, Schindler said.
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SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1997
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is setting hunting seasons and bag limits for waterfowl this fall, and while it is almost set in cement that there will be no days for migratory Canada geese in the Atlantic Flyway, there are some interesting possibilities for duck hunters.Last year, with predictions of a fine fall flight of ducks, the USFWS chose a combination of liberal bag limits and seasons. In Maryland, that resulted in a 50-day season and a bag limit of four ducks per day.But many hunters in the state will admit they rarely came close to getting a limit, despite the great numbers of ducks that were expected to be flying south last fall.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 4, 2011
Mary M. Stallings, a former hairstylist and artist, died Tuesday of heart failure at a daughter's Woodstock, Va., home. She was 98. Mary Margaret Francis was born in Buffalo, N.Y., and moved in 1919 with her family to Forest Park. She attended city public schools. Before World War II, Mrs. Stallings owned and operated a beauty shop in the old Emerson Hotel at Baltimore and Calvert streets. She later styled her customers' hair from her home. The former longtime Timonium resident, who had lived in Woodstock since 2003, was a self-taught artist.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | February 2, 1997
As research gives new insights into the past, information about antiques is always being updated.For many years, collectors prized the furniture made by P. Mallard. Records show he was in New York in 1829 but by 1832 was working in Louisiana. His store moved up and down Royal Street in New Orleans until 1874.Mallard made rococo and Renaissance Revival-style Victorian furniture with elaborate carvings. He was known in some directories as Pierre Mallard, but many collectors believed his name was Prudence.
NEWS
February 4, 1997
Police LogLothian: Someone broke off the knob of a rear door of a home in the 6200 block of Mallard Lane overnight Saturday to get in and steal a television valued at $400.Pub Date: 2/04/97
FEATURES
By ROBERT McCLOSKEY | December 2, 1998
Editor's note: In this children's classic from the 1940s, Mr. and Mrs. Mallard look for the perfect place to raise their family only to find it in an unlikely spot - the city of Boston.Mr. and Mrs. Mallard were looking for a place to live. But every time Mr. Mallard saw what looked like a nice place, Mrs. Mallard said it was no good. There were sure to be foxes in the woods or turtles in the water, and she was not going to raise a family where there might be foxes or turtles. So they flew on and on.Then they flew over the Charles River.
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | May 24, 1991
WESTON, Conn. -- Robert McCloskey was living on Myrtle Street in Boston and each morning walked through Copley Square and up Huntington Avenue to his art class on St. Botolph Street. First, he had to walk across the Public Garden, which was a favorite place of his.He did not yet have the idea for his small and famous book that is set there. Fifty years later, however, the story he wrote and the pictures he drew have become so well known that many Americans who have never heard of Oliver Twist know Mr. and Mrs. Mallard and their offspring, Jack, Kack, Lack, Mack, Nack, Ouack, Pack and Quack.
NEWS
December 16, 1995
An article and photograph in yesterday's editions of The Sun described how seven women shot 45 mallard ducks during morning hunt on a Dorchester County farm. Forty-three of the ducks were banded birds raised and released on the farm, and two of the ducks were wild birds. State law governing the number of ducks hunters can shoot on a single day -- the "bag limit" rule -- exempts from the count birds raised and released on a farm, so the hunters were not in violation of the individual daily bag limit for mallards, which is four birds (with only one being female)
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | October 25, 1998
With more than 170 books to his credit, children's author and illustrator Robert Quackenbush is still at it.He started his career as an illustrator, decorating 60 books with his pictures, but began creating stories after his son's birth in 1974. The idea for "Batbaby," Quackenbush's award-winning book about a baby bat's first venture on his own, came from his son's graduation from college and start in the real world.His wife, Margery, was the inspiration behind Miss Margery Mallard of the "Miss Mallard Mysteries" stories.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2010
Police and passers-by brought the morning rush to a halt in downtown Baltimore on Wednesday to help a mother mallard and her 11 ducklings make their way to the relative safety of the Inner Harbor. "It was an incredible way to start the day," said Daveed Korup, 51. A performing-arts specialist at the Port Discovery children's museum, Korup was walking to get his morning coffee about 8 a.m. when he pitched in to help herd the waterfowl. "I needed something to cheer me up, and there it was."
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Julie Scharper and Nicole Fuller and Julie Scharper,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com and julie.scharper@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
WALDORF - The call came in just before 11 p.m. A car crash, not far from the high school. Tonya Mallard, an emergency medical technician with the Waldorf Volunteer Fire Department, was among the rescuers. And when a medevac helicopter took off to rush two injured teenagers to the hospital, Mallard was onboard. "It was her first ride," Assistant Chief James R. Hayden recalled yesterday, not long before black bunting was hung from the firehouse. "She wanted to go." Mallard, a 38-year-old wife and mother of two, was killed when the helicopter ran into bad weather and crashed in a Prince George's County park.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | May 30, 2008
Drivers on Pratt Street never had to make way for ducklings yesterday. Scrambling to prevent a mama mallard from walking 11 newly hatched offspring across the busy downtown thoroughfare from their nest in a sidewalk planter, animal rescuers whisked the babies off to a Baltimore County wildlife shelter - leaving their frantic mother to fly off alone. "She's probably going to re-clutch again, someplace else, I hope," said Gerda Deterer, president of Wildlife Rescue, Inc., near Hampstead, where the ducklings were taken.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2000
If the tie on Arundel girls basketball coach Lee Rogers looked unfamiliar last night, so did the result of the game: a loss. In a game that pitted two of the best teams in the Baltimore-Washington corridor, the top-ranked Wildcats were knocked from the ranks of the unbeatens by a 57-40 loss to visiting Riverdale Baptist in Gambrills. The setback ended a 15-game winning streak for Arundel (2-1) that dated back to last season when the Wildcats captured the Class 4A state championship. For Rogers, the loss signaled the end of his suit-and-tie wardrobe.
FEATURES
By ROBERT McCLOSKEY | December 2, 1998
Editor's note: In this children's classic from the 1940s, Mr. and Mrs. Mallard look for the perfect place to raise their family only to find it in an unlikely spot - the city of Boston.Mr. and Mrs. Mallard were looking for a place to live. But every time Mr. Mallard saw what looked like a nice place, Mrs. Mallard said it was no good. There were sure to be foxes in the woods or turtles in the water, and she was not going to raise a family where there might be foxes or turtles. So they flew on and on.Then they flew over the Charles River.
FEATURES
By Randi Kest | October 25, 1998
With more than 170 books to his credit, children's author and illustrator Robert Quackenbush is still at it.He started his career as an illustrator, decorating 60 books with his pictures, but began creating stories after his son's birth in 1974. The idea for "Batbaby," Quackenbush's award-winning book about a baby bat's first venture on his own, came from his son's graduation from college and start in the real world.His wife, Margery, was the inspiration behind Miss Margery Mallard of the "Miss Mallard Mysteries" stories.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Julie Scharper and Nicole Fuller and Julie Scharper,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com and julie.scharper@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
WALDORF - The call came in just before 11 p.m. A car crash, not far from the high school. Tonya Mallard, an emergency medical technician with the Waldorf Volunteer Fire Department, was among the rescuers. And when a medevac helicopter took off to rush two injured teenagers to the hospital, Mallard was onboard. "It was her first ride," Assistant Chief James R. Hayden recalled yesterday, not long before black bunting was hung from the firehouse. "She wanted to go." Mallard, a 38-year-old wife and mother of two, was killed when the helicopter ran into bad weather and crashed in a Prince George's County park.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1996
For sale: 22-foot sailboat. Sleeps four. Stove, radio, lights, ducks.David Schott is offering a boating accessory that may or may not lure prospective buyers.Tucked in the folds of the mainsail of his boat is a mallard duck and her nest of four large eggs.And that presents a dilemma.Because the duck, a migratory waterfowl, is protected by federal law, Mr. Schott can't set sail from his Annapolis slip without permission, which could keep him tied to the dock for a month.His choices?Apply and wait for a federal exemption or let nature take its course.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | July 13, 1997
First the white-tailed deer. Then the Canada goose.Now comes the latest case of suburban ecosystems run afoul: mutant ducks.In Columbia, officials want to trap ducks to weed out the domestic white ones and their hybrid offspring as part of a larger effort to reduce the drake population quacking along the planned community's three lakes.Exactly how the white ducks got there isn't clear. The most likely suspects are people who buy cute little Easter ducklings for children -- and two months later find themselves with a problem.
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