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Malicious Prosecution

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By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Baltimore Ravens All-Pro linebacker Ray Lewis dropped malicious prosecution charges yesterday against two women who accused him of hitting them in a 1999 Woodlawn bar fight. In return for Lewis dropping the charges, the women dropped their appeal of the April jury award that cleared Lewis. The women, Sherita A. Williams and Catrice Hill, filed suit against Lewis, saying that he hit them during a fight when they confronted one of Lewis' friends at the Windsor Inn on Windsor Mill Road on Nov. 29, 1999.
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SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
It's unknown whether Roderick Green's status as an NFL player had anything to do with the stabbing of the Ravens' reserve linebacker Sunday. The league and team, however, devote considerable resources to educating their players about the downside of their celebrity in general, and specifically how to deal with incidents such as the one that endangered Green. "I've spoken to the team a half-dozen times in preseason camp, precisely about this issue," said C. Carey Deeley, an attorney for the Ravens.
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NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
A Baltimore County jury cleared All-Pro linebacker Ray Lewis of wrongdoing yesterday and ordered two women to pay $10,000 for suing him after a fight at a Woodlawn bar in 1999. Lewis showed no emotion as the verdict was announced, but he hugged his attorney and his mother, who sat behind him throughout the four-day trial. "I'm just happy to win," Lewis said. The jury, made up of six women, found the plaintiffs, Sherita A. Williams and Catrice Hill, liable for malicious prosecution and ordered each of them to pay $5,000.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
After listening to eight days of testimony detailing a nasty, longstanding skirmish in Little Italy, Baltimore jurors began deliberating last night about whether to award $1 million in damages to the president of the neighborhood association. Plaintiff Roberto Marsili, president of the Little Italy Community Organization, sued community residents Rosa Aquia and her daughter Gia Blatterman for malicious prosecution and abuse of process, saying they brought an erroneous harassment suit and other legal action against him. The case, heard in Baltimore Circuit Court, was punctuated by heated testimony, accusations, name-calling and an appearance by Orioles Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Palmer.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
After listening to eight days of testimony detailing a nasty, longstanding skirmish in Little Italy, Baltimore jurors began deliberating last night about whether to award $1 million in damages to the president of the neighborhood association. Plaintiff Roberto Marsili, president of the Little Italy Community Organization, sued community residents Rosa Aquia and her daughter Gia Blatterman for malicious prosecution and abuse of process, saying they brought an erroneous harassment suit and other legal action against him. The case, heard in Baltimore Circuit Court, was punctuated by heated testimony, accusations, name-calling and an appearance by Orioles Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Palmer.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 28, 1994
A Carroll Circuit judge yesterday dropped one of two defendants from a Woodlawn woman's $5 million lawsuit alleging racial and professional misbehavior by Springfield Hospital Center police officers.Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. said Ida Hawkins, 54, had failed to show that Officer John Craven's role in a June 27, 1990, traffic stop led to false arrest, malicious prosecution and intentional infliction of emotional distress.Judge Beck also dismissed the allegations of malicious prosecution and false arrest against Officer Ricky Hinkle, but he decided to allow a jury to decide the emotional distress count beginning today.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Dennis O'Brien and Jamie Smith and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
A federal jury yesterday awarded $80,000 to a Baltimore woman who was accused of writing a bad check at Paramount's Kings Dominion, was locked up for a night and spent almost a year preparing for trial before charges were dropped.A U.S. District Court jury in Greenbelt awarded the damages to Stephanic P. Austin for false arrest, malicious prosecution and civil rights claims she filed against Paramount Parks, which owns Kings Dominion.The jury deliberated two days before awarding Austin $40,000 in compensatory damages for deprivation of her civil rights, false arrest and malicious prosecution.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | February 25, 1995
Two Baltimore police officers who once raided a home belonging to one of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's relatives and came up empty-handed have sued the city for $30 million, claiming the mayor has gotten his revenge by ruining their careers.Officers Chris Wade and John Mohr, two former Northwestern District narcotics officers, allege in the lawsuit that the mayor has sought to "avenge himself" for the July 17, 1991, raid by subjecting them to malicious prosecution and menial police assignments.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 1, 1997
Interestingly, perhaps ironically, the color of Stephanie Austin's skin was not an issue in her successful civil damage suit against Paramount's Kings Dominion. A jury awarded her $80,000 for false arrest and malicious prosecution without ever hearing Austin's attorney suggest that the appalling treatment of a young black woman in a Virginia amusement park three years ago might have been racially motivated.Austin, too, was spared such contemplations, and almost, it seems, glad of it - even though her original complaints against Paramount included "corporate arrogance and racism."
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | September 18, 1992
To Mark L. Corrallo, half of the fun of going to a Baltimore Orioles game is searching for premium tickets at bargain prices from fans looking to get rid of their extras.That's how he bought his tickets outside of Memorial Stadium and that's how he picked up four front-row seats for the sold-out game on Mother's Day at Oriole Park at Camden Yards."You can get really good seats that way," the 35-year-old attorney from Kensington said. "You can strike gold."But after being arrested May 22 for "doing business without a license" -- he says he was buying, not selling, and for below face value at that -- Mr. Corrallo doesn't find the ticket hunt to be so much fun.He's filed a $3 million suit charging the Orioles, the Maryland Stadium Authority, a city police officer and the city with malicious prosecution.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2002
Baltimore Ravens All-Pro linebacker Ray Lewis dropped malicious prosecution charges yesterday against two women who accused him of hitting them in a 1999 Woodlawn bar fight. In return for Lewis dropping the charges, the women dropped their appeal of the April jury award that cleared Lewis. The women, Sherita A. Williams and Catrice Hill, filed suit against Lewis, saying that he hit them during a fight when they confronted one of Lewis' friends at the Windsor Inn on Windsor Mill Road on Nov. 29, 1999.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2002
A Baltimore County jury cleared All-Pro linebacker Ray Lewis of wrongdoing yesterday and ordered two women to pay $10,000 for suing him after a fight at a Woodlawn bar in 1999. Lewis showed no emotion as the verdict was announced, but he hugged his attorney and his mother, who sat behind him throughout the four-day trial. "I'm just happy to win," Lewis said. The jury, made up of six women, found the plaintiffs, Sherita A. Williams and Catrice Hill, liable for malicious prosecution and ordered each of them to pay $5,000.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | August 1, 1997
Interestingly, perhaps ironically, the color of Stephanie Austin's skin was not an issue in her successful civil damage suit against Paramount's Kings Dominion. A jury awarded her $80,000 for false arrest and malicious prosecution without ever hearing Austin's attorney suggest that the appalling treatment of a young black woman in a Virginia amusement park three years ago might have been racially motivated.Austin, too, was spared such contemplations, and almost, it seems, glad of it - even though her original complaints against Paramount included "corporate arrogance and racism."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Dennis O'Brien and Jamie Smith and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1997
A federal jury yesterday awarded $80,000 to a Baltimore woman who was accused of writing a bad check at Paramount's Kings Dominion, was locked up for a night and spent almost a year preparing for trial before charges were dropped.A U.S. District Court jury in Greenbelt awarded the damages to Stephanic P. Austin for false arrest, malicious prosecution and civil rights claims she filed against Paramount Parks, which owns Kings Dominion.The jury deliberated two days before awarding Austin $40,000 in compensatory damages for deprivation of her civil rights, false arrest and malicious prosecution.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | February 25, 1995
Two Baltimore police officers who once raided a home belonging to one of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke's relatives and came up empty-handed have sued the city for $30 million, claiming the mayor has gotten his revenge by ruining their careers.Officers Chris Wade and John Mohr, two former Northwestern District narcotics officers, allege in the lawsuit that the mayor has sought to "avenge himself" for the July 17, 1991, raid by subjecting them to malicious prosecution and menial police assignments.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | July 28, 1994
A Carroll Circuit judge yesterday dropped one of two defendants from a Woodlawn woman's $5 million lawsuit alleging racial and professional misbehavior by Springfield Hospital Center police officers.Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. said Ida Hawkins, 54, had failed to show that Officer John Craven's role in a June 27, 1990, traffic stop led to false arrest, malicious prosecution and intentional infliction of emotional distress.Judge Beck also dismissed the allegations of malicious prosecution and false arrest against Officer Ricky Hinkle, but he decided to allow a jury to decide the emotional distress count beginning today.
SPORTS
By PAUL MCMULLEN and PAUL MCMULLEN,SUN REPORTER | July 11, 2006
It's unknown whether Roderick Green's status as an NFL player had anything to do with the stabbing of the Ravens' reserve linebacker Sunday. The league and team, however, devote considerable resources to educating their players about the downside of their celebrity in general, and specifically how to deal with incidents such as the one that endangered Green. "I've spoken to the team a half-dozen times in preseason camp, precisely about this issue," said C. Carey Deeley, an attorney for the Ravens.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 17, 2002
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals yesterday upheld a $2 million civil judgment against a Baltimore police officer accused of beating a man, leaving him paralyzed and then filing false charges against him in a 1997 incident. The city is obligated to pay the judgment because Officer Joseph Tracy, a seven-year veteran of the force, was working in a law-enforcement capacity at the time. Tracy was found liable in December 2000 in Baltimore Circuit Court for malicious prosecution and for violating the rights of Horace Muhammad.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | September 18, 1992
To Mark L. Corrallo, half of the fun of going to a Baltimore Orioles game is searching for premium tickets at bargain prices from fans looking to get rid of their extras.That's how he bought his tickets outside of Memorial Stadium and that's how he picked up four front-row seats for the sold-out game on Mother's Day at Oriole Park at Camden Yards."You can get really good seats that way," the 35-year-old attorney from Kensington said. "You can strike gold."But after being arrested May 22 for "doing business without a license" -- he says he was buying, not selling, and for below face value at that -- Mr. Corrallo doesn't find the ticket hunt to be so much fun.He's filed a $3 million suit charging the Orioles, the Maryland Stadium Authority, a city police officer and the city with malicious prosecution.
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