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Malice

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NEWS
By Russell Baker | December 15, 1993
BEHIND the lovely, turbulent spleen-venting that is the argument over political correctness lies something far more authentically American than the spirit of goodness and love for constitutional freedoms which ostensibly motivate the disputants.That something is malice for one's fellow man.For those opposed to P.C. doctrines, what a joy it is to tee off on those fascistic language suppressors who are out to destroy freedom of speech by punishing people for Badspeak.For the P.C. champions, what a delight to flail away with gusto, labeling the unfair, the benighted and the wrong-minded with some of the most poisonous words in the lexicon of what passes for English in this era of galloping illiteracy.
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NEWS
May 23, 2011
President Obama's demand that Israel withdraw to its pre-1967 borders shows either ignorance or malice. Conquering Arab armies seized what was granted to Israel by the 1948 United Nations resolution. Your demand that Israel return its own land to the those who attacked it and were defeated is an outrage and something never in history demanded of anyone other than the Jewish people. One can only wonder why such selectivity. The problem is not a matter of land! The crux of the problem is the refusal of the Arabs and Palestinians to accept the right of Israel to exist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | October 1, 1993
Rumor has it the studio had a great deal of difficulty comin up with a trailer for "Malice." And you can see why: The movie has too many elements to fit into the 2-minute, hyper-dramatized, foreshortened form of the preview. But . . . that's not bad. That's good.Because that gets at "Malice's" cardinal and most welcome virtue: At no time do you know where it's going but when it gets there, you realize it could have gone no other place. In fact it's an astonishment: a dense, vivid and suspenseful thriller that feels wholly fresh and that restores a value missing from American movies since at least "Body Heat" of 12 years past -- cleverness.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | June 29, 2008
The family of a naked, unarmed man killed by a rookie Anne Arundel police officer in 2005 has sued the county for $10 million. Deborah Bell, the grandmother of Donald E. Coates Jr, the 20-year-old Glen Burnie man who was shot to death, alleges that Officer Timothy Pleasant was "unreasonable" and acted with "malice" on the night of May 24, 2005, in a wrongful-death lawsuit filed last month in Circuit Court. "No reasonable police officer under the same or similar circumstances would have shot Donald Coates Jr. dead from behind as he was running away," the lawsuit states.
NEWS
February 8, 1997
Margaret Halsey, 86, author of the 1938 best seller "With Malice Toward Some," which mocked British customs, died Tuesday in White Plains, N.Y.Milton Berger,81, a Coney Island press agent who dedicated his life to promoting Brooklyn's legendary amusement district, died Monday in New York City.Pub Date: 2/08/97
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1996
Ruthann Aron's candidacy for the U.S. Senate was torpedoed by an opponent who knew she was not a criminal but repeatedly called her one, her lawyers told an Anne Arundel Circuit Court jury yesterday.Ms. Aron is asking jurors to find that William E. Brock, a former U.S. senator and secretary of labor, defamed her at a news conference and in advertisements broadcast in the closing days of their 1994 race for the Republican nomination for Senate.Ms. Aron, a Potomac lawyer and real estate developer, alleges that by distorting the facts about two civil suits filed against her, Mr. Brock went beyond the acceptable rules for campaign rhetoric, ruining her reputation and costing her the election.
NEWS
June 27, 1991
The Supreme Court has ruled that a journalist may be sued for deliberately misquoting someone in a way that results "in a material change in the meaning conveyed by the statement." Such an alteration is evidence of "actual malice" -- knowledge that one's reporting is false or a reckless disregard for whether the article is true or false. "Actual malice" is the standard journalists writing about public figures have lived with for a generation in the area of defamation.All nine justices agreed the case should go to trial, that the First Amendment does not apply.
NEWS
By Arnold Rosenfeld | December 23, 1998
IT'S a free country, my father used to say. Everyone's entitled to their own opinion, he went on to elaborate, shunning nice grammar.Most people of my father's time agreed. Cliche-ridden as these ideas might have been, they were a gesture of respect for the guy with a different idea. The recent House impeachment hearings show how much we have slipped.Make no mistake, this country has always argued with itself spectacularly. We did, after all, have a Whiskey Rebellion and a Civil War. We have always done poorly when we relied on scorn, disrespect and recrimination.
NEWS
March 20, 1992
One of the most hotly contested issues at the General Assembly this session has been a proposal to impose on victims harsh burdens of proof and evidence in order to collect punitive damages from corporate wrongdoers.It would require that plaintiffs not only prove that a company engaged in heinous conduct, but that a manager or principal of the company involved committed, knew about or sanctioned that wrongdoing. Awards would have to be commensurate with the harm caused.Proponents claim this bill would add a measure of predictability to punitive damage awards, which on occasion are outrageous.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 17, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Daily newspapering can require toughness, what with demanding deadlines and the need for thick skin, especially if one is in the business of criticizing politicians, as Herbert Block was as America's premier political cartoonist. Yet in all his years until his death last week at 91, the man who signed his prodigious output "Herblock" was a living contradiction. For all his rapier-like assaults in print on the pompous, the hypocritical and the crooked in public life, he was the gentlest of souls.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | July 22, 2007
An Edgewater woman whose pit bull was shot and killed by an Anne Arundel County police officer last fall has filed a $3 million lawsuit, alleging the officer was reckless and used excessive force. The lawsuit accuses the unnamed police officer of attempting to enter the home of Deborah Ransom, 58, on Nov. 28, when the dog "enthusiastically and gently" pulled at the officer's sleeve, according to court records. With Ransom and her teenage daughter, Tiffany Hancock, standing just a few feet away, the officer shot the dog in the back.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 17, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Daily newspapering can require toughness, what with demanding deadlines and the need for thick skin, especially if one is in the business of criticizing politicians, as Herbert Block was as America's premier political cartoonist. Yet in all his years until his death last week at 91, the man who signed his prodigious output "Herblock" was a living contradiction. For all his rapier-like assaults in print on the pompous, the hypocritical and the crooked in public life, he was the gentlest of souls.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 7, 1999
One thing you can say about "Strangers With Candy" is that the premise of this new series from the Comedy Central cable channel is certainly original."
NEWS
By Arnold Rosenfeld | December 23, 1998
IT'S a free country, my father used to say. Everyone's entitled to their own opinion, he went on to elaborate, shunning nice grammar.Most people of my father's time agreed. Cliche-ridden as these ideas might have been, they were a gesture of respect for the guy with a different idea. The recent House impeachment hearings show how much we have slipped.Make no mistake, this country has always argued with itself spectacularly. We did, after all, have a Whiskey Rebellion and a Civil War. We have always done poorly when we relied on scorn, disrespect and recrimination.
NEWS
By Alec Klein and Alec Klein,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Sheridan Lyons contributed to this article | July 11, 1998
Clinton Wakefield Epps is racing through the woods, sunshine piercing through the dusk, smoky and unreal, heart thumping, hair flying, imagining himself a Confederate infantryman in pursuit of Yankee cavalry.He is rushing forward, out into the clearing -- and there, he's trapped by Union re-enactors. Then it happens: a sudden blow against his neck, paralysis. He is falling, raising his left hand, feeling blood flowing from his neck and struggling to his knees and whispering "Medic."A man pretending to be a Union soldier calls out: "Bang, you're dead."
NEWS
By Robert M. O'Neil | February 8, 1998
Every president from George Washington to Bill Clinton has probably wished that he could file a libel suit against the media for disseminating some outrageous falsehood about his personal official conduct.During the early days of the Clinton sex scandal, the public was flooded with media reports, some of which appear to be false. The report that a DNA-stained dress would topple the president seems to have been discredited. And the Dallas Morning News retracted its report that a witness might have caught Monica Lewinsky and the president in an intimate encounter.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | November 1, 1993
Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the movie theaters, when you thought the humane, the compassionate, the earnest American movie industry had committed itself to making movies that reflected the very best that we could be, the very most politically correct we could aspire to, along comes a batch of films right in a row that are as politically correct as .44 Magnums.So you have to ask yourself: Do you feel lucky, punk?In other words: Is it a trend or is it an accident?Well, who knows?
NEWS
By Robert M. O'Neil | February 8, 1998
Every president from George Washington to Bill Clinton has probably wished that he could file a libel suit against the media for disseminating some outrageous falsehood about his personal official conduct.During the early days of the Clinton sex scandal, the public was flooded with media reports, some of which appear to be false. The report that a DNA-stained dress would topple the president seems to have been discredited. And the Dallas Morning News retracted its report that a witness might have caught Monica Lewinsky and the president in an intimate encounter.
NEWS
February 8, 1997
Margaret Halsey, 86, author of the 1938 best seller "With Malice Toward Some," which mocked British customs, died Tuesday in White Plains, N.Y.Milton Berger,81, a Coney Island press agent who dedicated his life to promoting Brooklyn's legendary amusement district, died Monday in New York City.Pub Date: 2/08/97
NEWS
By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1996
For 88 days, Richard Jewell was one of the most carefullywatched men in the United States.Reporters staked out his apartment. Cameras remained trained on his front door. Sometimes, scenes as innocent as Jewell climbing into the driver's seat of his car after wading through hordes of reporters led the nightly TV news.Now, Jewell, formally cleared last week in the bombing at Centennial Olympic Park in July, wants his persecutors to pay.His lawyers say that they're readying lawsuits against an Atlanta newspaper, NBC, NBC's news anchorman Tom Brokaw and possibly the FBI. Allegations of libel and invasion of privacy are likely.
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