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Malcolm Glazer

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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | December 1, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- All Baltimore got from the NFL owners yesterday was sympathy."I know what kind of commitment it takes [to try to get an NFL franchise]," said Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, after the league awarded its 30th franchise to Jacksonville, Fla. "It's a tremendous disappointment, and I accept that."Disappointment is putting it mildly. "Bitter" is the word that Gov. William Donald Schaefer used to describe his emotions.Baltimore spent years and hundreds of thousands of dollars trying to impress the NFL. It sold out an exhibition game in a few hours.
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SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | November 15, 1993
Should we get excited about the prospect of someone from Cleveland named Alfred Lerner joining Baltimore's expansion bid?Absolutely. Positively.As long as we're on a level playing field with St. Louis and the other cities, Alfred Lerner's arrival is important.As long as the NFL is handling the expansion process without any semblance of deviousness or favoritism, Alfred Lerner's arrival is important.In other words, as long as the tooth fairy exists and college basketball is clean and Paul Tagliabue has no agenda whatsoever and every politician in Washington is as earnest as Mr. Smith, the late addition of Alfred Lerner could prove decisive.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 1, 1993
So strong is their desire to own a National Football League franchise in Baltimore that Malcolm Glazer & Sons made an offer that seemingly couldn't be refused. Yet it was quickly discarded. The dollars were right; the premise wrong.What the Glazers proposed was to give each visiting team coming to Baltimore an astonishing $1.5 million per game, which would qualify as a record in take-home pay for any sport. It'smore than double, almost triple, the going rate for playing an NFL game on the road.
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By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Only three men were in the cramped room when a hotel security guard knocked on the door and tersely requested that they follow him.Herbert J. Belgrad, chairman of the Maryland Stadium Authority, Rouse Co. chairman Mathias J. DeVito, and Ernie Accorsi, a special adviser to Baltimore's NFL expansion group, grabbed their suit coats. It was shortly after 9 p.m., Baltimore time, on Tuesday, more than 12 hours after NFL owners had begun meeting to determine the 29th and 30th teams for the league.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | October 27, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Now Baltimore, as never before, must reach back for extra strength, continuing resolve and a new ownership arrangement to assemble its resources for still another drive toward the National Football League goal line.It would be foolhardy to let the disappointment of last night's expansion effort destroy the exceptional work that has carried Baltimore this far. Gov. William Donald Schaefer and the Maryland Stadium Authority aren't going to back off now.They are still alive in the expansion chase.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | October 13, 1993
Much of what's unfolding in Baltimore's pursuit of a National Football League expansion franchise is the kind of material that makes for a high-powered mystery novel. Only this is authentic, the real goods and not born of the imaginative mind of some writer working out of his attic to portray fictionalized situations.There are the two committed groups, headed by Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass and Malcolm Glazer, eager to win the right to own the team in the event the NFL grants Baltimore approval.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer Staff writer John Frece contributed to this article | September 21, 1993
CHICAGO -- Baltimore's presentation to football owners today may decide not only whether the city gets back into the NFL, but also who would own the franchise if it were awarded.Baltimore's delegation -- including Gov. William Donald Schaefer makes its presentation from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Because it is the only city with two ownership groups vying for the team, $l Baltimore will get an additional 30 minutes for the investors to make their separate pitches.Baltimore -- which is competing with Charlotte, N.C., St. Louis, Memphis, Tenn.
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By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Staff Writer | August 15, 1993
Got the perfect name for a Baltimore NFL team? Get in line.In a place where oyster yields are falling, industrial jobs are growing scarce, and the once-ubiquitous Natty Boh is almost impossible to find at sporting events, there is no shortage of passion when it comes to naming a potential football team."
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 6, 1993
June 1990: Orioles majority owner Eli Jacobs describes his hands-off approach toward club executives: "There is no decision that they would make, or agree upon, that I could conceivably overrule."February 1993: Joel Glazer describes how his family would operate an NFL expansion franchise: "The way we run all of our organizations, we go out and get the best possible people and let them run with it."Once bitten, twice shy, right?Well, maybe.The Glazers, like Jacobs, are out-of-towners, but Joel -- the son of Florida businessman Malcolm Glazer -- might actually mean what he says about the type of owner his father would be under the new NFL labor agreement.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | December 11, 1992
Joel Glazer called it "the light at the end of the tunnel" fo Baltimore's expansion hopes.Glazer, whose father, Malcolm Glazer, heads one of the groups trying to get an expansion team for Baltimore, was excited about the news that the NFL owners and players have reached an agreement in principle that could pave the way for the league to go ahead with expansion."
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