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Malcolm Glazer

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By John Steadman | January 27, 1992
MINNEAPOLIS -- Super Bowl activity brought visitations from all three of Baltimore's would-be ownership groups -- providing the city is awarded an expansion franchise.Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass was here and, according to commissioner Paul Tagliabue, "went out snowmobiling with Mike Lynn," general manager of the Minnesota Vikings before the start of the Super Bowl.Tom Clancy and his wife arrived for the game and Joel and Bryan Glazer, sons of Malcolm Glazer, another potential owner, spent the better part of the week getting to know NFL officials.
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SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - Malcolm Glazer's contentious takeover of famous English soccer team Manchester United gained an audience with the NFL's finance committee yesterday during ownership meetings. Glazer, who owns the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and once tried to win an expansion team for Baltimore, must account for Manchester United's announced plans to build a casino and entertainment complex near Old Trafford, its stadium. Although the NFL bans owners from holding stakes in casinos, league spokesman Greg Aiello described the development as "a blip on the radar screen" in the two-day meetings at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 30, 1992
In Section 8 of Memorial Stadium's upper deck, with a hallelujah chorus of 60,021 souls ringing in his ears, Malcolm Glazer opens his mouth and sings off-key."
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman | December 19, 2004
The Brits were no-shows. A week after suggesting they would disrupt Baltimore marketing maven Bob Leffler's annual holiday party because of his work for Malcolm Glazer, supporters of Manchester United were nowhere to be seen outside City Lights restaurant Thursday night. Leffler, who has a 12-year association with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' owner, last month took over the public relations duties for Glazer's effort to buy a controlling interest in Manchester United. Glazer owns more than 28 percent of the world's most famous soccer team.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman | December 19, 2004
The Brits were no-shows. A week after suggesting they would disrupt Baltimore marketing maven Bob Leffler's annual holiday party because of his work for Malcolm Glazer, supporters of Manchester United were nowhere to be seen outside City Lights restaurant Thursday night. Leffler, who has a 12-year association with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers' owner, last month took over the public relations duties for Glazer's effort to buy a controlling interest in Manchester United. Glazer owns more than 28 percent of the world's most famous soccer team.
NEWS
September 28, 1991
If Baltimore wins the race for a National Football League expansion team, it will need to unite behind a single bidder. And that individual has to possess oodles and oodles of hard, cold cash -- perhaps as much as $200 million worth.Nathan Landow, a prominent Maryland real estate developer, had pieced together an impressive group of well-heeled individuals eager to plunk down $100 million in greenbacks to secure an NFL team for Baltimore. But this won't be nearly enough to win the hard-fought contest.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | December 1, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Malcolm Glazer, a man not known for sentimentality, was near tears yesterday after Baltimore's bid for an NFL expansion team ended in failure."
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - Malcolm Glazer's contentious takeover of famous English soccer team Manchester United gained an audience with the NFL's finance committee yesterday during ownership meetings. Glazer, who owns the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and once tried to win an expansion team for Baltimore, must account for Manchester United's announced plans to build a casino and entertainment complex near Old Trafford, its stadium. Although the NFL bans owners from holding stakes in casinos, league spokesman Greg Aiello described the development as "a blip on the radar screen" in the two-day meetings at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 14, 1995
It would be like the Dallas Cowboys losing to Prairie View A&M, the Toronto Blue Jays losing to the Bad News Bears, Michael Jordan losing a game of one-on-one to Danny DeVito.Peter Angelos losing to Malcolm Glazer.Naturally, the possibility arose on Friday the 13th. When it comes Baltimore's NFL quest, it's always Friday the 13th. The only thing that changes is the actor playing Jason.Paul Tagliabue, Jack Kent Cooke, now Steve "Tell Us Another" Story.Angelos' enemies list just keeps growing.
NEWS
By Vito Stellino | September 18, 1991
The Malcolm Glazer family, the newest entrant in the National Football League expansion derby, says it has the financial clout to jump-start Baltimore's stalled franchise bid.Glazer, the sole owner of a privately owned conglomerate, brings an asset that no other potential owner may be able to match: He says he has the liquid capital available to write a check for the full price of the team without selling any assets or borrowing money.In their first interview since they notified the Maryland Stadium Authority last month that they planned to bid for a team for Baltimore, two of Mr. Glazer's sons, Bryan and Joel, said yesterday that the family has the cash available to buy the team even if it costs from $150 million to $200 million.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | August 9, 1998
Our comparison is Memorial Stadium. Good old Memorial -- obstructed views, narrow concourses, crowded bathrooms. Walking into the Ravens' new stadium last night was like walking into the Orioles' new stadium six years ago. Like going from black-and-white to color.The concourses, the sound system, the scoreboards -- it's a brave new world, a mind-blowing upgrade, a just reward for this jilted city. The stadium is better than Memorial, better than Jack Kent Cooke Stadium, better than almost all of them.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
PHOENIX -- On the day Malcolm Glazer finally became a member of the NFL club, St. Louis officially threatened to sue to get in.After the NFL owners unanimously approved the sale of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers to the Glazer family yesterday, they started to debate the thorny issue of the Los Angeles Rams' proposed move to St. Louis.Hanging over the discussions was a declaration from the attorney general of Missouri, Jay Nixon, that the state will file an antitrust suit against the league if the move is turned down.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | January 18, 1995
When Malcolm Glazer told the world he would prefer to be in Tampa Bay rather than Baltimore he certainly wasn't being hypocritical. He's going to be paid $40 million in television revenues the next three years because he's buying an existing club -- not an expansion outfit in Baltimore, where he would have been excluded from the National Football League's current TV agreement.He comes out far ahead in the game, which means he gets back $120 million of his $192 million purchase price. You don't have to be able to add 2 and 2 to figure Malcolm does better, starting out, in Tampa with an established team than if he had succeeded in Baltimore with the right to start a new one.If Glazer didn't know it before, he realizes now that Baltimore is a provincial place, feeding on the propaganda of the harbor redevelopment and a new baseball park.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | January 16, 1995
That Malcolm Glazer & Sons are within the stroke of a pen of purchasing the Tampa Bay Buccaneers -- and it was to be done today -- is not exactly an upset. A comeback of sorts? Perhaps. But the Glazers were always there, with quiet presence, as they demonstrated unrelenting resolve to acquire a major-league team.Shortly after 6 a.m. today, a source in Tampa said that it was "all over," and the Glazers had bought their way into the National Football League for a record price of $192 million.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Sun Staff Writer | January 14, 1995
One of Baltimore's best shots at returning to the NFL in a decade was on the verge of collapse yesterday as Malcolm Glazer -- a one-time Baltimore booster -- neared a deal for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.After a full day of negotiations, which saw representatives for both sides shuttle between Tampa law offices, the team announced it was close to a deal, but had not reached one and wouldn't until Monday at the earliest.If the deal is consummated, Mr. Glazer, whose unsuccessful courtship of sports teams had led some to brand him a "tirekicker," will have silenced two of the biggest talkers in sports: Peter Angelos and George Steinbrenner.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 14, 1995
It would be like the Dallas Cowboys losing to Prairie View A&M, the Toronto Blue Jays losing to the Bad News Bears, Michael Jordan losing a game of one-on-one to Danny DeVito.Peter Angelos losing to Malcolm Glazer.Naturally, the possibility arose on Friday the 13th. When it comes Baltimore's NFL quest, it's always Friday the 13th. The only thing that changes is the actor playing Jason.Paul Tagliabue, Jack Kent Cooke, now Steve "Tell Us Another" Story.Angelos' enemies list just keeps growing.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1991
Three for the price of one.After all the posturing and politicking, after all the campaigning and crooning, that's what Baltimore's bid for an NFL expansion franchise comes down to.Three potential owners say they have filed applications for one potential franchise, meeting today's written-in-clay deadline.Bowing out in an 11th-hour decision was the Phyllis Brotman group that included four Baltimoreans. Unable to convince chicken king Frank Perdue to invest big bucks, the Brotman people withdrew from the expansion race, but left the door slightly ajar.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
Nathan Landow read the fine print at the bottom of those profit and loss statements and decided he didn't need to wait for the writing on the wall.Landow, a Bethesda real estate developer, called off his two-year bid for an NFL expansion team in Baltimore yesterday, then threw his support to Malcolm Glazer, citing Glazer's offer to pay as much as $200 million in cash for the franchise."
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | October 8, 1994
At first, he was the outsider, the maverick, the rebel leading the charge for the football fans of Baltimore, known within the NFL as Les Miserables.Now, Jim Speros is about as anti-establishment as Nancy Reagan.He talks about getting into the NFL.He wants to bring major-league baseball to Northern Virginia.And he keeps fighting for the Colts name not because he's morally outraged, but because it's good for business.Suddenly, he's one of them.Who created this monster?Frankly, there's only one way for Speros to save his soul before Peter Angelos steals the Los Angeles Rams and dooms him to sports purgatory.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | December 1, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- All Baltimore got from the NFL owners yesterday was sympathy."I know what kind of commitment it takes [to try to get an NFL franchise]," said Jerry Jones, owner of the Dallas Cowboys, after the league awarded its 30th franchise to Jacksonville, Fla. "It's a tremendous disappointment, and I accept that."Disappointment is putting it mildly. "Bitter" is the word that Gov. William Donald Schaefer used to describe his emotions.Baltimore spent years and hundreds of thousands of dollars trying to impress the NFL. It sold out an exhibition game in a few hours.
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