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SPORTS
March 18, 2010
Eric Chun took a break from studying for two finals and writing papers for his Public Speaking and Team Leadership classes by winning a spot in the British Open. Not a bad extracurricular activity for the Northwestern sophomore. Chun flew to Malaysia to compete in an International Final Qualifying event and to defy the math. Seventy-one players would fight for four spots. Chun was one of two amateurs in the field. He laid up to 75 yards on the par-5 18th, knowing he needed to make birdie to avoid a four-man playoff.
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NEWS
April 21, 1994
Americans who condemn Singapore's sentence of a U.S. youth to caning for vandalism, like those who praise it, should be aware it is part of a whole fabric of difference between that society and ours.Caning for vandalism was instituted in 1966, to suppress political graffiti. Importing drugs brings execution. There is no crime to speak of, no chewing gum on the subway, no rudeness, no real political opposition or open criticism. This is a far cry from contemporary America, but U.S. families who live there have to comply with the authoritarian laws that make Singapore safe though regimented.
NEWS
January 15, 1999
THE ASIAN disease did not hit the healthy United States when it reached Brazil, which devalued its currency Wednesday. But spread of the ailment to the world's eighth-largest economy means the sickness has infected the Western Hemisphere.U.S. trade with Brazil is small but growing, while U.S. private investment in Brazil is huge. So the threat of inflation and devaluation in Brazil is more to U.S. portfolios than to U.S. exporters.The $41.5 billion credit pledged to Brazil by the International Monetary Fund and Group of Seven nations in November, in return for deficit reduction, was in the U.S. national interest.
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | October 31, 2010
TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS NASCAR Sprint Cup: Amp Energy 500 ESPN1 MLB W. Series Game 4: San Fran.@Texas 45, 58 NBA Utah@Oklahoma City NBA7 PBA All-Star Shootout (T) ESPN210:30 a.m. Skating 2010 ISU Grand Prix: NHK Trophy (T) 11, 44 C. foot. Duke@Navy (T) CBSCS12:30 NFL Washington@Detroit 45, 51 Miami@Cincinnati 131 Minnesota@New England 45, 54 Tennessee@San Diego 94 Pittsburgh@New Orleans 11, 48:15 Euro.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 18, 1999
Day traders, who have tilted the bourses this year by darting in and out of Internet stocks like bumblebees on a lily, are a new form of an old financial problem: hot money.Day traders try to make a living by buying and selling stocks in a very short period. Minutes, sometimes seconds. A couple hours is a long-term investment. They're as patient as piranhas, faithful as Delilah.Internet bookseller Amazon.com has been prime day-trade prey. Its stock price tells the tale. It was $41 in November, $199 in January, $89 in February and $180 last week.
NEWS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1997
In a cavernous room on the 12th floor of First National Bank of Maryland, John Michael Rusnak and Matthew F. Kozak sit side by side with their eyes trained on a bank of computers.Rusnak slides his chair behind a computer called the Electronic Brokering System and swings into action. Second by second, the computer shows the prices currency traders at money-center banks and large investment houses around the world are willing to pay to exchange their dollars for marks, francs, pounds and other major currencies.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 22, 1991
MALACCA, Malaysia -- The monsoon winds blew tall trading ships to Malacca for centuries, east from India and west from China, laden with silk and spice and the great cultures of the world.Muslims were the first to arrive, followed by the Chinese and then the Portuguese, who fell to the Dutch, who gave way to the British, who brought in the Indians.And so Malacca remains to this day a bowl of curry noodles and a mug of Guinness Stout, as interesting as one of its fabled antique shops on Jonker Street, unspoiled by the "progress" that has helped turn Kuala Lumpur and Singapore intoglass-and-steel boom towns searching for their souls.
NEWS
By Gwynne Dyer | December 4, 1997
THE UNITED Nations' climate summit that opened this week in Kyoto, Japan, will probably not end in a flaming row. Countries must not lose face, and so they are more likely to cobble together some shoddy compromise that is worth nothing. But a spectacular failure would be much better, for at least it might get the donkey's attention.Or more precisely, the frog's attention. Environmentalists often compare human behavior to that of frogs -- who, if you drop them into a pot of boiling water, will jump right out again and survive.
FEATURES
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 26, 1996
ON THE ANDAMAN SEA -- Southeast Asia, and the living is easy.Along the shores of Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia and Singapore, the jungle vegetation is in full riot, the old architecture is in picturesque post-colonial decline, modern economies are in overdrive, and here and there a beach lies fine-grained and underpopulated. Every day, I face a devil of a choice: explore ashore, or submit to serious luxuries aboard ship.By serious luxuries, I do not mean the occasional complimentary umbrella-topped cocktail.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 11, 1994
Melanie refused to be hurried. She wanted to inspect every leaf, turn over every rock and dip her hands in every trickle of water.Exasperated, Matt and Reggie hurried ahead of us on the trail in Mount Rainier National Park. Soon, Melanie demanded to be carried. But every minute or so, she wanted to get down to examine something else."Good thing we weren't attempting a really long hike," mhusband, Andy, said, straining with 37-pound Melanie on his shoulders; we'd forgotten the child backpack at home.
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