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NEWS
May 17, 1992
When the International Monetary Fund cut off aid to Kenya until human rights improvements were made, President Daniel Arap Moi legalized the opposition. Now that the IMF and donor nations have cut off aid other than humanitarian famine relief to Malawi, for the same reason, President H. Kamuzu Banda should do the same.First he will have to show that he knows it happened.Dr. Banda, the founder of the Southeast African country and its leader since 1963, a year before independence, is officially 86 years old although unofficial accounts have him older.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | November 7, 2011
Remember last week when the teams carried their beds into a remote Malawi village? They then slept in private huts. Enjoy this moment from Ernie: "Home sweet home. Got my mosquito netting, just like at home. Got my straw roof, just like at home. " Ernie has been my secret tv boyfriend for a few weeks, but now I'm going public with it because he makes me laugh. After their cozy night in the village, all the teams end up on the same crowded bus to Salima. Amani and Marcus were an hour and a half behind, but they squeeze onto the bus just before it leaves, telling the driver that their friends are on board.
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NEWS
May 27, 1994
After 30 years of oppressive dictatorship, the country held a free election. The dictator came in second place out of three and graciously conceded defeat. The new president promised him honorable retirement and began to sweep out deadwood and bring modernization, with no witch-hunt against the old regime. People danced in the dusty roads. No one died. This is the way things are supposed to work. In Malawi, they did.Once it was called Nyasaland, a British possession linked to Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia)
NEWS
By Michael L. Buckler | January 30, 2011
The Peace Corps has endured a rough month. On Jan. 18, the Corps lost Sargent Shriver, its charismatic architect and first leader. The previous Friday, ABC News ran a grizzly story on violence against Peace Corps volunteers — Jess Smochek was gang-raped in Bangladesh in 2004; Kate Puzey was murdered in Benin in 2009. This raises the question: Has Mr. Shriver's Peace Corps become too dangerous for volunteers? There's no question that in male-dominated, developing countries, the Peace Corps experience is often more harrowing for women than men. Approximately 0.5 percent of female volunteers become rape victims in the Peace Corps (during the two-year service commitment)
NEWS
January 27, 1995
Hastings Kamuzu Banda performed two great services for his country, Malawi. He led it to independence from Britain in 1964. ++ He lost an election and gracefully stepped down in 1994. In between, he did notable disservices, such as steal the national wealth and crush opposition.Countrymen who treated him as a god, less out of true belief than fear of punishment, now see him as a prisoner facing justice. He is not in any fit state to stand trial. Aside from being in his upper 90s, he is in poor health and can plausibly fail to remember anything inconvenient.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 26, 1995
BLANTYRE, Malawi -- The picture of Dr. Hastings Kamuzu Banda was on every bill and coin in the pockets of the 1,000 people who had gathered in front of Malawi's High Court last week. His name -- Kamuzu -- is on the street they had just traversed and on the stadium nearby. It is on airports and hospitals, schools and highways; it is emblazoned just about everywhere.These people had gathered to witness what a few months ago was nearly unthinkable and without doubt unspeakable: Dr. Banda, the country's one-time president-for-life, was to be subjected to the machinery of justice that had for so long existed only to do his bidding.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 13, 1991
BLANTYRE, Malawi -- When the president of Malawi descended from his mountaintop palace to welcome Vice President Dan Quayle to town in September, the usual throngs )) awaited his red 1964 Rolls-Royce convertible.Hastings Kamuzu Banda, the 94-year-old president for life, watched solemnly as women in skirts that bore his picture broke into songs of praise. In his right hand, a fly whisk made of a lion's tail moved in time with the music.Meet one of America's oldest and best friends in Africa.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 17, 1992
A federal jury yesterday awarded $61,501 to a Malawi man who claimed he was paid $60 a month while being forced to work 17-hour days for a Maryland couple who brought him to the United States to work as a house servant.The jury of four men and four women deliberated for 90 minutes before finding in favor of Caleb Joses Zintambila, 41, in the courtroom of Judge William N. Nickerson in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.Jurors awarded Mr. Zintambila $9,500 on his claim that Leonard F. and Jane Marte violated the Fair Labor Standards Act by failing to pay him the minimum wage.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Staff Writer | November 10, 1992
MWANZA, Malawi -- The only thing in abundance in this dirt-poor African country is refugees from the war next door. There is a food shortage, a water shortage and a money shortage here, but still the refugees keep coming from Mozambique.They come pouring in with little more than the rags on their backs in search of safety, stability and food. And they are still arriving, at a rate of at least 1,000 a day, despite a cease-fire agreement last month that formally ended 17 years of warfare.More than 1 million Mozambican refugees are crushed into Malawi, a small country of 9 million people in south-central Africa.
NEWS
By Rick Lyman and Rick Lyman,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 29, 1993
BLANTYRE, Malawi -- His excellency, the life president, emerged from his private Lear jet to the joyous ululations of several dozen brightly robed women lining the crimson carpet that led to his waiting red Rolls-Royce convertible.Hastings Kamuzu Banda, a man of indeterminate antiquity, is stooped and frail, with a tiny stubble of white hair ringing the great, bald head and drooping ears. He has maintained a fierce grip on this former British colony ever since independence in 1964, building a strange, almost religious cult around himself.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | April 30, 2008
I'M EMBARRASSED!" That's 15-year old Hannah Montana star Miley Cyrus, denying responsibility for a provocative Annie Leibovitz photo that appears in the June issue of Vanity Fair. Perhaps Miley should be embarrassed about acting the victim, blaming VF, for her own choices. Miley is still smarting from the release of private MySpace pictures that showed her playing peek-a-boo with her blouse (nice green bra underneath) and cozy with a boy. I thought the "scandal" over that was ridiculous.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun Foreign Reporter | May 25, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa --An acute health worker shortage in southern Africa is preventing many people with AIDS from getting lifesaving drugs, and Western donor policies are part of the problem, a new report claims. Major American and European aid programs do not help pay nurses' salaries because the effort is seen as "unsustainable," says the report, released here yesterday by the medical charity Doctors Without Borders. Also, the International Monetary Fund, by pushing countries to limit wages, has restricted African governments from raising salaries as a way of easing the "brain drain" of home-grown medical expertise, the report adds.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | October 30, 2006
ATLANTA -- Thank heaven for Oprah. Last week, the queen of TV talk had the common sense to applaud Madonna's charitable works in the desperately poor African nation of Malawi. Interviewing the beleaguered pop culture icon via satellite, Oprah Winfrey made clear that she and her studio audience supported Madonna's efforts, including her provisional adoption of a small boy. It's about time that an influential voice stepped forward to state the obvious: No matter what Madonna's motives are, she is doing the right thing.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 2005
LILONGWE, Malawi -- Choice, often elusive in life here, is all too abundant in death. A person who dies in this sleepy southern African capital can go off to his rest in a handmade casket from the SAP Coffin Workshop ("Makers of the Last Home"), the Wodala Casket and Coffin Shop ("Now open 24 hrs"), the Tayamba company, the Kalimba company or any of a dozen other purveyors. One after another, they line a dusty quarter-mile stretch of road like a funeral train for Malawians dying of the toxic brew of poverty and infectious disease, especially AIDS.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2002
DOWA, Malawi - For the first time in a decade, severe hunger is sweeping across southern Africa. The United Nations says that two years of erratic weather - alternating droughts and floods - coupled with mismanagement of food supplies have left 7 million people in six countries at risk of starvation. Here in this dusty village, 14 people have already died from hunger-related illnesses in the past four months, health workers say. It is harvest time, but crops are withered and many people are eating banana roots and pumpkin leaves.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 7, 2002
THE SOUTHERN African Republic of Malawi is as good a place as any to demonstrate the imperatives and risks of foreign aid. A little smaller than Pennsylvania in land and population, Malawi has no natural resources to speak of and is locked inside the continent by Mozambique, Zambia and Tanzania. Malawians live on less than a dollar per day, typically, growing tobacco, sugar cane, tea and other crops. They can look forward to an average life span of 37 years. One in 10 babies does not reach its first birthday.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 20, 2005
LILONGWE, Malawi -- Choice, often elusive in life here, is all too abundant in death. A person who dies in this sleepy southern African capital can go off to his rest in a handmade casket from the SAP Coffin Workshop ("Makers of the Last Home"), the Wodala Casket and Coffin Shop ("Now open 24 hrs"), the Tayamba company, the Kalimba company or any of a dozen other purveyors. One after another, they line a dusty quarter-mile stretch of road like a funeral train for Malawians dying of the toxic brew of poverty and infectious disease, especially AIDS.
NEWS
By Michael L. Buckler | January 30, 2011
The Peace Corps has endured a rough month. On Jan. 18, the Corps lost Sargent Shriver, its charismatic architect and first leader. The previous Friday, ABC News ran a grizzly story on violence against Peace Corps volunteers — Jess Smochek was gang-raped in Bangladesh in 2004; Kate Puzey was murdered in Benin in 2009. This raises the question: Has Mr. Shriver's Peace Corps become too dangerous for volunteers? There's no question that in male-dominated, developing countries, the Peace Corps experience is often more harrowing for women than men. Approximately 0.5 percent of female volunteers become rape victims in the Peace Corps (during the two-year service commitment)
NEWS
By Ben Jacklet and Ben Jacklet,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2000
BOLELA MALUNGA, Malawi -- It's 3.30 a.m., and a strong head wind is blowing across Lake Malawi from the east. Capt. Jeffrey Andoche, a 22-year-old Yao from the lakeshore village of Bolela Malunga (population 550), sets the tempo for his crewmen with evenly cadenced, high-pitched shouts before each new stroke. The four fishermen, all 22 or younger and built like welterweight boxers, lean into their oars and slowly propel the boat out into the deep waters of the lake. They chatter constantly as they work the oars, joking in Chiyao and laughing when big waves break over the bow. Andoche and his crewmen work with no motors, no hydraulics and only the most basic fishing gear.
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