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By SUN STAFF | September 29, 2003
MOSQUITO-BORNE malaria kills 2 million people each year -- mostly African children -- and infects more than 300 million others. Those numbers are bound to increase because the malaria parasite and mosquitoes are increasingly drug resistant. "Beyond the extraordinary human toll, malaria is one of the greatest barriers to Africa's economic growth, draining national health budgets and deepening poverty," Bill Gates said recently in announcing grants totaling $168 million to fight malaria.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Under Armour founder Kevin Plank was so impressed with Friday's winner of the nationwide entrepreneur competition he runs with the University of Maryland, he offered the graduate student $25,000 in exchange for a stake in his company. Disease Diagnostic Group founder John Lewandowski walked away with $105,000 in total from the Cupid's Cup Business Competition - $75,000 in first place winnings, $5,000 as the audience favorite and the sweetener from Plank. Carrie Handwerker, a spokeswoman for the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business, said Plank arranged for the equity stake to be held by his Cupid Foundation.
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TRAVEL
By KATHLEEN DOHENY and KATHLEEN DOHENY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2006
Every year, about 1,300 people in the United States learn they have malaria. Most are travelers, and many are blasM-i about malaria. If they had taken antimalarial pills as directed - before, during and after the trip - and followed simple precautions, they would have greatly reduced the risk of getting the mosquito-transmitted disease. Worldwide, malaria affects up to 500 million people a year; 1 million die of the disease annually. It is endemic in more than 100 countries and territories, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Dr. Timothy D. Baker, a professor of international health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where his career spanned more than five decades, died Dec. 17 of a stroke at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Cockeysville resident was 88. His death is "an incredible loss for our program, the department, and the school to start, but really the entire global health community," Dr. Adnan A. Hyder, a professor of international health at Hopkins, said in a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health announcement of Dr. Baker's death.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 7, 1994
NEW YORK -- For the first time in more than four decades, residents of metropolitan New York have contracted malaria from local mosquitoes, federal health officials said yesterday.Three of the cases occurred last July in the New York borough of Queens, startling city health officials who this year, for the first time in recent memory, are regularly trapping the insects and testing them for the disease. Two other cases, to be reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine, were seen in New Jersey in 1991.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 16, 2002
Malaria-infected mosquitoes have been found on an uninhabited Montgomery County island in the Potomac River that is a state wildlife refuge, the second time this month that infected mosquitoes have been found on an uninhabited county island. Montgomery County health officials said the mosquitoes were discovered in one of 10 traps on Van Deventer Island, a small tract just south of the site on Selden Island where malaria-infected mosquitoes were discovered last week. Lynn Frank, chief of public health services for Montgomery County, said the mosquitoes were trapped Thursday and tested Friday by researchers from the Bethesda-based Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
Dr. David Francis Clyde, a world-renowned malaria expert whose experiences and research in Tanzania led to a greater understanding of the disease, died of pancreatic cancer Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 77. Born in Meruit, India, the son of a physician, he was sent to England at age 7 to study. He was evacuated from England at the start of World War II and sent to Kansas City, Kan., where he lived with relatives and graduated from high school in 1942. He earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Kansas in 1946 and earned his medical degree from McGill University in 1949.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | August 27, 2006
MAPHUNGWANE, Swaziland -- Men in blue coveralls and white surgical masks began their annual trek into the countryside here last week. Methodically, they sprayed one home after another with a chemical most Americans probably thought disappeared from use long ago: DDT. As villagers looked on, the workers doused inside and outside walls with a fine mist. It is a yearly effort to repel and kill mosquitoes that carry malaria - a disease that kills more than a million people a year, mostly children in sub-Saharan Africa.
NEWS
January 16, 2002
The student: Suneel Bhat, 18 School: River Hill High Special achievement: Bhat is a semifinalist in the 2001 Siemens Westinghouse Science and Technology Competition. What he did: Bhat worked with a mentor who cured people of malaria. He tested the blood of those infected for immune responses against the disease. What is he most proud of: His Boy Scout Eagle Award project. He managed construction of a pavilion at Therapeutic Riding Center in Glenwood to aid in the rehabilitation of seizure-disorder patients.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 29, 2002
Q. I will be traveling to Kenya and will need to take anti-malaria medication. I've heard conflicting information regarding side effects of Lariam. Some authorities state that this medicine has a low level of side effects. But I have also heard testimonials from people who have had panic attacks after taking this drug. Do you have any information on this? Is there any alternative? A. Lariam (mefloquine) has made headlines because the Army is investigating the drug's possible connection to a series of domestic murders and suicides at Fort Bragg, N.C. The soldiers had taken Lariam to prevent malaria while on active duty.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
A graduate of Johns Hopkins University's international studies school, eight months pregnant, was among dozens killed in the weekend massacre at a Kenyan shopping mall. Elif Yavuz, 33, who earned her graduate degree from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies in 2004, was killed along with her husband, architect Ross Langdon, according to media reports. Gunmen stormed the Westgate Mall in Nairobi on Saturday, and were still locked in a standoff with Kenyan forces by Monday.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
Thank you for informing your readers about the work of the Global Fund ("Global Fund seeks $15 billion to control three big killers," Sept. 12). Since its inception in 2002, the Global Fund has provided treatment and prevention to millions of individuals for HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. With recent advances in treatment and vaccinations, transmission rates of these three major killers have been significantly lowered, and millions of lives have been saved. If we wait, we may miss the chance to eradicate these diseases altogether.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
William O. Goldstein, a Korean War veteran who practiced law in Baltimore for half a century, died Aug. 21 of kidney failure at Roland Park Place. He was 87. The son of Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, an internationally known urological surgeon, and Elsie May Goldstein, a homemaker and volunteer, William Osler Goldstein was born in Baltimore and raised in Forest Park and Guilford. After graduating in 1945 from City College, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1949 from Washington College in Chestertown.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2013
Hundreds of thousands of people die of malaria every year, most of them in Africa. Dr. Eddy C. Agbo wants people to get diagnosed quickly and easily - right in their homes - so they can seek treatment. The barrier to quick and easy diagnoses is that all available tests require blood. His Baltimore company is readying a version that uses urine - just like a pregnancy test. It should hit the market next year. Agbo, chief executive of Fyodor Biotechnologies, grew up in Nigeria and envisions the malaria test as the first in a line of products that could make an impact in developing countries.
NEWS
By Carolyn Woo | April 25, 2013
Malaria is an enormous and tragic problem - that can be beat. It takes the life of a child every minute in Sub-Saharan Africa, and a million people die from malaria each year. It also stifles economic development, as malaria prevents children from attending school and adults from working. Today is World Malaria Day, and I am pleased to celebrate the lives saved and enriched by recent attention and investments. Not that many years ago, this would be an occasion for hand-wringing and lamenting the many victims of this disease and wishing we could get the world to do more.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | December 24, 2011
Malaria remains a worldwide scourge, but scientists at Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute believe they have found a way to get the mosquitoes to help stop passing the disease to humans. They have shown that they can genetically engineer Anopheles mosquitoes' immune systems to block transmission of the malaria-causing parasite. Specifically, the scientists engineer the mosquitoes to produce a higher than normal level of an immune system protein called Re12 when they feed on human blood to boost the parasite fighting capabilities.
TOPIC
By STORY BY DOUGLAS BIRCH | July 9, 2000
ILIFI, Kenya -- It's a calamity occurring in slow-motion, something that many see happening but no one is sure how to stop. Here in Africa, where AIDS and tuberculosis rage, doctors are witnessing another health catastrophe in the making, a surge in fatal cases of malaria. The reason? The rise of resistance to anti-malarial drugs. First came the collapse of chloroquine -- one of the wonder drugs of the 20th century -- as a reliable treatment. Now health officials are turning to their second line of defense, a drug called Fansidar.
NEWS
By Andrew Kipkemboi and Andrew Kipkemboi,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
Tonight, 3,000 families in sub-Saharan Africa will mourn the deaths of their children. A similar number mourned yesterday; the same number will mourn tomorrow and the next day as drug-resistant strains of malaria claim more lives. Malaria's deadly march has been unrelenting, killing on average 1 million people each year, mostly women and small children, and infecting 500 million in the poor regions of the world. If the mosquito-borne disease is not checked, it could replace AIDS as the No. 1 killer in the developing world.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 6, 2009
Strengthening its position as a global center in the fight against malaria, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is one of two Baltimore institutions tapped for a five-year, $100 million project to help combat the mosquito-borne disease. The school will work with Catholic Relief Services to use a grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development to procure and promote long-lasting, insecticide-treated bed nets in countries with malaria, a disease that sickens more than 650 million people a year.
NEWS
By Andrew Kipkemboi and Andrew Kipkemboi,Sun reporter | June 15, 2008
Tonight, 3,000 families in sub-Saharan Africa will mourn the deaths of their children. A similar number mourned yesterday; the same number will mourn tomorrow and the next day as drug-resistant strains of malaria claim more lives. Malaria's deadly march has been unrelenting, killing on average 1 million people each year, mostly women and small children, and infecting 500 million in the poor regions of the world. If the mosquito-borne disease is not checked, it could replace AIDS as the No. 1 killer in the developing world.
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