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Malala Yousafzai

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By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 14, 2012
"Truth crushed to earth will rise again. " -- Martin Luther King Jr. (quoting William Cullen Bryant) Sometimes, oceans are not enough. Usually, the fact that we are barricaded on both sides by great bodies of water gives us in this country a certain sense of remove from the awful things people with funny names do to one another in strange places on the far side of the globe. But once in a while, the thing is awful enough that you can't ignore it, or pretend that it is less real.
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NEWS
October 13, 2014
To lend our support to girls' education globally, Roland Park Country School salutes the United Nations' International Day of the Girl, which recognizes girls' rights and the unique challenges girls face, especially in education. This week also marks six months since 273 Nigerian school girls were kidnapped, and they have not yet been returned to their families. And on Friday, the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Malala Yousafzai, 17, the youngest person ever to win the prize. Malala is the Pakistani teenager and education activist who was shot in the head by the Taliban on a school bus two years ago for speaking up for girls' education.
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NEWS
By Ritu Sharma | November 14, 2012
Last month, when 14-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot and wounded by the Taliban in Pakistan, the world responded with outrage. That she was simply defending her right to an education made the event even more astounding. Her almost superhuman courage represents the face of an entire generation of girls around the world who struggle against extraordinary odds to get an education. Malala's struggle is at once unique and ubiquitous. Most girls in the developing world are not shot on a school bus. Yet they continue to face high barriers that keep them from school and make education an uphill struggle.
NEWS
By Lynne Agress | September 22, 2014
Now that the school year has begun, we have many questions: Is the new Core Curriculum good or bad? What about "No Child Left Behind"? How many remedial courses should a college student be allowed to take? Letter grades versus pass/fail? The questions and ensuing discussions are endless. But what about reading? If every first grader learned to read - to read well - I believe we would see many more successful students - on all levels, as well as many more successful people as a whole.
NEWS
October 13, 2014
To lend our support to girls' education globally, Roland Park Country School salutes the United Nations' International Day of the Girl, which recognizes girls' rights and the unique challenges girls face, especially in education. This week also marks six months since 273 Nigerian school girls were kidnapped, and they have not yet been returned to their families. And on Friday, the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Malala Yousafzai, 17, the youngest person ever to win the prize. Malala is the Pakistani teenager and education activist who was shot in the head by the Taliban on a school bus two years ago for speaking up for girls' education.
NEWS
December 9, 2013
I could not help note that while reading "NSA tracks location of phones, documents show" (Dec. 5), there was a nearby ad for a cell phone and other electronic devices. Readers should also know that the National Security Agency provides "intelligence" in coordinating killer drone strikes. Later in the same newspaper, was an excellent perspective on this aerial assassination program - "Drone warfare half-truths. " Faheem Younus wrote, "But for every militant killed by a U.S. drone strike, 50 civilians perish, and the U.S. military suffered over 75 percent of its casualties in Afghanistan only after drone strikes surged in 2008.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 20, 2013
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- While American cable TV news engaged in saturation coverage of the closing arguments and verdict in the George Zimmerman murder trial, the BBC and Sky News carried an inspiring speech by Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old Pakistani girl shot in the head last October by the Taliban for advocating the education of girls. On her birthday, Malala addressed in barely accented English a special youth gathering at the United Nations in New York. She wore a shawl that had belonged to the late Pakistani President Benazir Bhutto, who was assassinated by Islamic extremists in 2007.
NEWS
By Lynne Agress | September 22, 2014
Now that the school year has begun, we have many questions: Is the new Core Curriculum good or bad? What about "No Child Left Behind"? How many remedial courses should a college student be allowed to take? Letter grades versus pass/fail? The questions and ensuing discussions are endless. But what about reading? If every first grader learned to read - to read well - I believe we would see many more successful students - on all levels, as well as many more successful people as a whole.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
The tragic assassination attempt in Pakistan against 14-year-old student Malala Yousafzai, merely because she was a female who spoke out for women's education, is a disturbing reminder that there are still places in our world where an educated woman is considered a threat. More disturbing still is that it occurred in a nation which 24 years ago elected Benazir Bhutto as the first female prime minister of a Muslim country. It is a potent reminder that progress for women does not always proceed linearly.
NEWS
October 17, 2012
As a female doctor from Pakistan, I am disgusted by the assassination attempt against 14-year-old Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani blogger and women's rights activist ("Outspoken teen shot," Oct. 10). In my view, this attack was actually directed at the legacy of the Prophet Muhammad, who declared that "seeking knowledge is obligatory upon every Muslim man and woman. " He added that believers should "seek knowledge even if you have to go to China. " Aisha, the prophet's wife, was a learned woman who imparted knowledge to both men and women.
NEWS
December 9, 2013
I could not help note that while reading "NSA tracks location of phones, documents show" (Dec. 5), there was a nearby ad for a cell phone and other electronic devices. Readers should also know that the National Security Agency provides "intelligence" in coordinating killer drone strikes. Later in the same newspaper, was an excellent perspective on this aerial assassination program - "Drone warfare half-truths. " Faheem Younus wrote, "But for every militant killed by a U.S. drone strike, 50 civilians perish, and the U.S. military suffered over 75 percent of its casualties in Afghanistan only after drone strikes surged in 2008.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 20, 2013
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- While American cable TV news engaged in saturation coverage of the closing arguments and verdict in the George Zimmerman murder trial, the BBC and Sky News carried an inspiring speech by Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old Pakistani girl shot in the head last October by the Taliban for advocating the education of girls. On her birthday, Malala addressed in barely accented English a special youth gathering at the United Nations in New York. She wore a shawl that had belonged to the late Pakistani President Benazir Bhutto, who was assassinated by Islamic extremists in 2007.
NEWS
By Ritu Sharma | November 14, 2012
Last month, when 14-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot and wounded by the Taliban in Pakistan, the world responded with outrage. That she was simply defending her right to an education made the event even more astounding. Her almost superhuman courage represents the face of an entire generation of girls around the world who struggle against extraordinary odds to get an education. Malala's struggle is at once unique and ubiquitous. Most girls in the developing world are not shot on a school bus. Yet they continue to face high barriers that keep them from school and make education an uphill struggle.
NEWS
October 22, 2012
The tragic assassination attempt in Pakistan against 14-year-old student Malala Yousafzai, merely because she was a female who spoke out for women's education, is a disturbing reminder that there are still places in our world where an educated woman is considered a threat. More disturbing still is that it occurred in a nation which 24 years ago elected Benazir Bhutto as the first female prime minister of a Muslim country. It is a potent reminder that progress for women does not always proceed linearly.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 14, 2012
"Truth crushed to earth will rise again. " -- Martin Luther King Jr. (quoting William Cullen Bryant) Sometimes, oceans are not enough. Usually, the fact that we are barricaded on both sides by great bodies of water gives us in this country a certain sense of remove from the awful things people with funny names do to one another in strange places on the far side of the globe. But once in a while, the thing is awful enough that you can't ignore it, or pretend that it is less real.
NEWS
By Jean Waller Brune | May 8, 2014
"I speak not for myself but for those without voice, those who have fought for their rights, their right to live in peace, their right to be treated with dignity, their right to equality of opportunity, and their right to be educated. " - Malala Yousafzai Pakistani schoolgirl Malala Yousafzai captured our hearts and minds this past year as she fought for her life after being shot in the face by the Taliban for standing up to promote the education of girls. Hers is a very powerful story of the struggle tied to girls' education around the world, and her remarkable appearance at the United Nations on her 16th birthday made her an ambassador and role model for girls everywhere and their right to education.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Did you hear Time has named its Person of the Year and The Voice has a new winner? Bored? Not impressed? Well, what if I told you I had a video of a  GOLDEN EAGLE snatching a BABY !!!!!  YouTube and Reddit are buzzing this morning with a video purportedly out of Canada that shows a large bird momentarily picking up a small child. Don't worry the kiddie was not whisked away to the nest atop Death Mountain. The video is probably fake, but that hasn't stopped people from freaking out and watching, including me. [UPDATE: Yup, the video is fake.]
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