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By Michael Ollove and Mark Hyman and Michael Ollove and Mark Hyman,Staff Writers Staff writer Ian Johnson and editorial assistants Marc Bouchard and Maani Martin contributed to this article | August 8, 1993
Peter G. Angelos sat in a Manhattan courtroom last Monday watching irritably as a New York lawyer tried to scuttle five months of arduous work and keep him from getting his hands on the Baltimore Orioles.The man kept shooting to his feet like some kind of human piston, amazing the crowd with bids that were higher, ever higher.It was almost unfathomable. Only moments before he had arrived in the courtroom, smiling and greeting well-wishers, Mr. Angelos, 64, had been down the hall striking what he believed would be the final blow.
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By Mark Hyman and Mark Hyman,Staff Writer | August 28, 1993
Jim Palmer's last official trip to a big-league mound came about a decade ago, but the Orioles have never stopped appreciating their Hall of Fame pitcher.Or, as it turns out, paying him.Palmer, who, except for a brief spring-training comeback two years ago, retired in 1984, will collect $30,468 from the Orioles this year, putting him among more than a dozen former players and front-office employees who are receiving a little more than $8.6 million in deferred salaries and bonuses from the Orioles.
SPORTS
By Stan Rappaport and Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF | April 13, 1997
They have handled similar situations the only way they know (( how -- with class.One is rich, famous and a future Hall of Famer.The other is a senior at Howard High.Say hello to Cal Ripken and Rachel Grantham."Cal Ripken would rather be playing shortstop, there's no doubt about it," said Howard coach Dave Vezzi. "But Cal's playing third base and helping his team. Rachel's the same way. She's not going to come out and say, 'I don't want to play second base, I want to be pitching.' She's going to help the team whatever way she can, and if playing second base is where she's going to help, that's what she'll do."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1996
HOUSTON -- You expect to find some high-tech laboratory with hundreds of leotard-clad clones running around. Lithe little Nadias doing their flips and tumbles in one corner, muscular little Mary Lous doing their vaults in another. You expect to see this great bear of a man -- and certainly hear his booming voice -- the moment you walk in the door.But Bela Karolyi's gym is different from what you expect, mostly because it looks pretty much the same as hundreds of other neighborhood gyms across the country.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | August 10, 2009
If you're a sucker for feel-good NFL training camp stories, you'll want to hear about Tony Fein. Fein, 27, is an undrafted rookie linebacker out of Mississippi who's trying to catch on with the Ravens this summer. Depending on whom you talk to, he either has no shot to make the team or the kind of shot you have of hitting the trifecta at the track tomorrow. If he's lucky, he could stick as a practice-squad player. This would be bitterly disappointing to Fein. But it won't kill him. And that's fine with him, since the man has already seen death up close as an Army combat veteran in Iraq, where he served for a year as a 19 Delta recon scout.
SPORTS
By Matt Schnabel, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Donnell Whittenburg isn't quite sure when his gymnastics career began, years before the medals, the tryouts and traveling across the country, but he can remember where it all started: the backyard of his childhood Baltimore home. The 19-year-old U.S. men's national team member, who will compete on Thursday in the preliminary rounds of the Winter Cup Challenge in Las Vegas, recalls performing handstands and other stunts outside his house, a practice his mother, Sheila Brown, didn't take to fondly.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Orioles left-hander Zach Britton has no structural damage in his injured left shoulder, but it continues to appear likely that he will start the season on the disabled list after his visit with renowned orthopedist Dr. James Andrews on Wednesday. Britton visited Andrews in Pensacola, Fla., for another opinion on the recent flare up of inflammationon his left shoulder. Andrews saw no structural damage, but he received two rounds of platelet rich plasma injections to help settle the inflammation.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | August 17, 1996
The Bandits, already affiliated up (Mighty Ducks of Anaheim) and down (Raleigh IceCaps), have agreed to another working agreement with a hockey team, this one with the Richmond Renegades of the East Coast Hockey League.The Bandits serve as a developmental team for Anaheim, and Ducks players not making the team here usually end up in Raleigh of the ECHL. The agreement with Richmond will involve free agents signed to AHL contracts by Baltimore. To date, the Bandits have signed two players who belong to them, defensemen Keith Aldridge and Brian Goudie, and are expected to sign two or three more.
SPORTS
By Jean Marbella and The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2012
Fairly or not, elite U.S. swimmers seem to spring from largely white, suburban pools of the country, which makes Lia Neal stand out. Hailing from Brooklyn's Flatbush neighborhood, the 17-year-old Neal made the Olympic team Saturday night after coming in fourth in the 100-meter freestyle, winning a spot on the relay team that will compete in London. Neal, whose father is African-American and mother is Chinese, has been mentored by the likes of Michael Phelps and Allison Schmitt, who have traveled with rising young swimmers as they gain experience competing in Moscow, Berlin and Stockholm.
SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Rico Wallace has already made history. Now it's just a matter of making the team. When the Meade alum signed with the Carolina Panthers as an undrafted free agent on Sunday, he became the first ever from his college, Division III Shenandoah University, to do so. The wide receiver is one of at least five former high school players from the Baltimore area who have signed with NFL teams following last weekend's draft. Despite coming from a small school, Wallace impressed scouts by running a 4.53-second 40-yard dash at James Madison University's Pro Day after making 67 catches for 1,241 yards and 14 touchdowns in his senior year at Shenandoah.
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