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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 3, 1991
He's the boss. Bossman. Bossmeister. Mr. Boss-o-rama. He gets to say "action" and "cut." He gets to be sensitive with the actors, warm and caring with the actresses, tough with the Teamsters, wise with the critics and when it hits, the whole world falls down before him and tells him he's a genius.When it misses, he can't get his calls returned.He's the director, fulcrum of the system by which movies are made in the late 20th century, for better or worse.We have before us today three such men, each with a new movie in the marketplace and each, by the coincidence of such things, a member of what might be called the "old" generation of craftsmen, itself somewhat threatened by a more aggressive and less "literary" generation of post-Spielbergian youth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
When Debra Granik, the 47-year-old director of the searing drama "Winter's Bone," came of age in Bethesda and Silver Spring, Baltimore represented "this true place that had real neighborhoods and a phenomenal working-class history and port history." She loved to visit relatives here. It made her wonder "what it would have been like to come from Baltimore." For a creative soul with a thirst for unsanitized experience, Baltimore was like a gritty anti-Shangri-la, alluring for its heady dose of risk and reality.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | October 30, 2000
The stock market will rebound when the next president is elected, whoever. Save your Confederate euros. Europe will rise again. Downtown is now so popular, they have to tear it down to build garages for the people who must drive there. AT&T is going the way of former Yugoslavia, breakup into four puny little republics. They found the Blair Witch. It kills by making movies.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | June 14, 2009
A record number of teams, 53 as of Friday afternoon, are out frantically making movies in and around Baltimore this weekend, part of the annual exercise in creative cinematic anarchy otherwise known as the 48-Hour Film Project. "There will be at least 500 people out on the streets," said Rob Hatch, project organizer for Baltimore. "If they're aiming something at you, it's just a camera." Under the competition's rules, teams of filmmakers have exactly 48 hours to make a film between four and seven minutes long.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 20, 1991
W.D. Richter says there's no mystery about what's become of him in the seven years since he made "The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai," an eccentric and imaginative science-fiction movie that has become a cult classic."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The economy's good. The audiences are more adventurous. The distributors are scrounging for product. And the success stories are coming one after the other.Yes, says Chris Eyre, it's a great day to be an independent filmmaker.Eyre should know. As the director of last year's art-house hit "Smoke Signals," starring Adam Beach and Evan Adams as a pair of Coeur d'Alene Indians on a road trip that reveals a lot of what it means to be a Native American in the 1990s, he's spent the last year basking in the glow that only success can bring.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | April 23, 1993
DENVER -- Some day, audiences might stay home to watch movie premieres. For now, though, analysts expect moviegoers to do just that: go to the movies.Tele-Communications Inc. is negotiating to make a $90 million investment in ailing Carolco Pictures Inc. in return for rights to show the studio's movies on pay-per-view on the same day or before they are released in theaters, according to the Wall Street Journal. Tele-Communications owns a 50 percent stake in Reiss Media Enterprises Inc., a pay-per-view company.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 1996
LOS ANGELES -- In a toned-down sequel to his speech last year accusing Hollywood of promoting depravity, Bob Dole traded stick for carrot yesterday and praised the film industry for making movies that reinforce basic American values.Citing such financial and popular successes as the moonshot drama "Apollo 13" and the barnyard fable "Babe," the presumptive Republican presidential nominee told studio executives they could make money by making movies with positive themes."If our ticket windows are a kind of cultural ballot box, then the results are in and we can call a winner," Dole told about 200 employees and a sprinkling of movie executives at the 20th Century Fox studio here.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | February 20, 2000
LEO'S BACK, and the babe-ettes who made him a box-office god with multiple viewings of "Titanic" think they have grown up enough to handle him in a movie with sex, drugs, guns and shark attacks. It has been almost three Oscar cycles since "Titanic" made Leonardo DiCaprio one of the hottest commodities in the acting world, and that's a lifetime in preteen years. But if "Titanic" was a parental-permission reach for 10-to-12-year-olds, "The Beach," a hybrid of "Lord of the Flies" and "Apocalypse Now" which opened in theaters last weekend, deserves every bit of its "R" rating.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2004
Sascha Wolhandler worked until 2 a.m. recently making desserts look good for a movie shoot on a $30 million yacht docked off Canton, and she never even got to see George Clooney, the leading man and presumably chief eater. "The only star was Christopher Plummer, which at my age is pretty exciting," Wolhandler says, although she refuses to reveal that age. "However, I don't think the 20- and 30-year-olds were as impressed." Plummer, a plummy-voiced Canadian who has been making movies since 1958, is perhaps best known for his role as Baron von Trapp in The Sound of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | January 25, 2009
For the past three years, the local beat-makers at Darkroom Productions have brought national attention to Baltimore's hip-hop scene. Now, the duo of Jamal Roberts, 31, and Juan Donovan Bell, 32, is looking to make waves in the movie business. In early March, Bell will move to Los Angeles and open a film office, where he plans to produce feature films and further incorporate Darkroom Productions tracks onto movie soundtracks. It's a natural progression, Bell said. "The move is elementary, really," said Bell, a Baltimore native who still lives here.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | August 10, 2008
Demontrae Easton was doing his best Martin Lawrence impression when one of the owners of Filmsters Academy dropped by the Bates Boys & Girls Club in Annapolis. Patti White wanted to offer scholarships to a few kids for her two-week summer film camp. White liked his energy and selected the 11-year-old for camp. Four years later, the outgoing kid from Glen Burnie seems to have caught the acting-singing bug.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | July 11, 2008
In the first episode of Elvis Mitchell: Under the Influence, the former New York Times film critic interviews the late director Sydney Pollack and elicits the sort of practical yet also profound knowledge that found its way into Pollack movies such as Tootsie. If you missed Monday's airings, set your recording device to TCM for tomorrow noon. Pollack is the perfect guest to introduce a show called Under the Influence, because he understands how intricate and personal the idea of "influence" is. In a spirited give and take, he names An American in Paris as the first film he saw more than once.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | May 28, 2008
The sex in Sex and the City? It's clothes porn. It's lusty shopping. It's erotic materialism. It's bags, baubles and stilettos that dangle and shine as enticingly as any aphrodisiac. In the movie that opens Friday, they're not trying to hide it. Consider the money moment in the trailer: "Should we get you a diamond?" Mr. Big asks Carrie, who after longing for Big since the show made its debut in 1998, is finally at the threshold of the marriage she dreamed of. "No," she replies. "Just get me a really big closet."
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | October 1, 2007
In a disheveled office just north of Baltimore, Chris Harring is aiming lights at a wall and framing a shot in a nearby camera. In less than four hours, this scene - however it turns out - will wind up in front of an audience at the Senator Theatre. Far from big-budget Hollywood - but smack in the middle of the city of John Waters - 20 independent film crews raced through the region yesterday attempting to produce a short movie on deadline for the Creative Alliance's sixth annual CAmm Slamm competition.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | April 24, 2007
It appeared that another body was about to turn cold on a hot summer night in East Baltimore. A middle-aged man stood tense as three dozen young men surrounded him in a back alley. He recognized a handful of them as the group he had earlier shooed away from loitering. They had returned for revenge - with reinforcements. "We'll shoot you in the face!" they shouted as some seemed to reach for concealed weapons. Just then, two patrol cars showed up. Everyone froze while police stared at the confrontation - and also at a track of spotlights on a nearby rooftop, loads of cable wire and someone barbecuing a few feet away.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | January 23, 1991
The crowd reaction to ''Eve of Destruction'' was the better part of the experience. Some of the male members of the audience bolted the theater as the movie was about to end. One shouted that he wanted his money back. The others said things you wouldn't want to see in print.You couldn't blame them. When it comes to silly movies, ''Eve of Destruction'' is one of the more ridiculous.The title character is a robot created in the image of its maker, a woman scientist. It's really a walking bomb, and, naturally, it malfunctions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jamie Portman and Jamie Portman,Southam News | May 6, 1994
Toronto -- Your first impression on entering the eighth-floor hotel suite is that George Bush is talking to someone on the telephone. But, of course, this slight, spiky-haired figure in the Levi jacket isn't George Bush. It's Dana Carvey doing one of his uncanny impersonations of the former U.S. president for the benefit of a reporter at the other end of the line.Moments later, he's offering his interviewer a drawling Jimmy Stewart. He finally hangs up, and assumes his own persona of Dana Carvey, a guy who cherishes the opportunity just to be himself -- a 38-year-old father of two with all the anxieties of today's middle class -- but who constantly finds himself under pressure to perform, even when he's not in front of the camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 31, 2005
WASHINGTON -- "In my head I was a wild man, but in my life I had blocks. I was living within all sorts of constraints," says Rob Cohen, 56, director of the action blockbusters The Fast and the Furious, XXX and the just-opened Stealth -- Top Gun updated by two decades. "Now I'm a 16-year-old boy in a middle-aged body." At one point, Cohen was best known as the bookish, Harvard-educated 22-year-old who fished the script to The Sting out of a slush pile. At another, it looked as if he made his mark in film history as a "baby mogul" executive at Motown, where he produced one of the top African-American films of the 1970s, The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 22, 2005
The reconstructed version of Sam Fuller's World War II movie The Big Red One plays the Charles tomorrow, Monday and Thursday and at a gala screening Thursday at the AFI Silver in Silver Spring. With 47 minutes added to its 116-minute release time, the movie is a must-see for devotees of war films - a revelation, if not exactly a masterwork. Twenty-five years ago, Fuller's film swam against a riptide of hits like The Empire Strikes Back and The Blues Brothers, buoyed only by the star power of a cast that includes the Star Wars saga's Mark Hamill and The Dirty Dozen's Lee Marvin.
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