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NEWS
December 24, 1990
With the Iraqi crisis reigniting the historic struggle between the presidency and the Congress over war powers, federal Judge Harold H. Greene has made the startling claim that the judiciary can intervene under certain circumstances when "action by the courts would appear to be the only available means to break the stalemate." Another federal judge, Royce Lamberth, sticking to tradition, has issued a contradictory ruling that the courts lack the "expertise, resources and authority" to intrude in such a "political" question.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
My colleague, Candy Thomson, recently reported that a study will soon evaluate the structural condition and projected life left in the Bay Bridge, while also considering the possible addition of a third span to accommodate traffic demands that will soar by 2025. The first span that bound the Eastern and Western Shores opened for traffic in 1952. It had been troubled by 45 years of haggling, vanished funding and public debate that was additionally fueled by doubters, controversy, economic downturns and wars.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 5, 1991
Just call it "The Stadium With No Name!"George is probably safe but he has a secret re-election strategy just in case. One whiff of trouble and we make war on Kirghizia.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | October 3, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- I'm surprised at the fuss over the National Intelligence Estimate that says the Iraq war made the terrorist threat worse. Did it take a leaked report by America's 16 intelligence agencies to confirm the obvious? By now, can anyone except the Bush team deny that administration policy has fueled a new generation of jihadi terrorists? The president's belated effort to counter the intelligence leak by declassifying selected bits of the report only confirmed the essential message: This administration's Iraq policies have been a gift to al-Qaida and its imitators around the globe.
TOPIC
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
We think of war and we think of airplanes. But when Orville and Wilbur Wright invented the airplane a century ago, they did not envision massive aerial bombardments of "shock and awe." In fact, the Ohio brothers once thought their invention would become the great deterrent to warfare. It was an idea shared by many after the inception of flight. War would become practically impossible, the brothers thought, because the scouting done by aircraft would equalize opposing nations with information on each other's movements, preventing surprise attacks.
NEWS
By Jim Fain | January 10, 1991
JAMES K. POLK was the first president to snooker the U.S. into a war. In 1846, he sent troops into disputed territory to goad Mexico into attacking. It worked. Congress, which he'd duped, had no choice except to declare war. Polk captured his prize -- California and the rest of what is now our Southwest.Thus the second U.S. war of conquest. The first: grabbing the country from its original residents, who, in a geographic stupor, we called Indians. It also was our second under the Constitution (the poorly waged business of 1812 having preceded it)
NEWS
By Mona Charen | June 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California was not pleased with the president's speech at West Point, in which he outlined the necessity for pre-emption against nations or groups that threaten this country. "I think this is a predicate for an attack on Iraq," the perceptive Democrat explained, "and I'm very concerned about it. I think it would be a terrible mistake for the United States unilaterally to attack Iraq, and to do so without any congressional authorization." Eleven years ago, we had a similar debate, about the same enemy, with a president of the same name.
NEWS
By Anthony Lewis | December 3, 1990
CAN PRESIDENT Bush take the country into war in the Persian Gulf without the approval of Congress? The question is heading toward decisive tests, legal and political. The answer could have profound consequences for our constitutional system and our internal peace.The president has moved very far toward war without asking for the consent of Congress. After Iraq gobbled up Kuwait in August, he sent a large American armed force to Saudi Arabia. Three weeks ago he ordered that force almost doubled, to give it an offensive capability.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration has subtly shifted the aims of NATO airstrikes against Yugoslavia, giving military officials a more achieveable goal while granting politicians a means to end the bombing without necessarily halting the slaughter in Kosovo.But as they hedge their bets, both President Clinton and top NATO officials are giving no signs of ending the air campaign, which will soon enter a far more dangerous phase when allied planes begin to target Serbian tanks and artillery.
NEWS
By Charlie Clements | March 7, 2003
I RECENTLY returned from an emergency public health mission to Iraq where I helped assess the consequences of a war on the civilian population, which has in many ways been reduced to the status of refugees. Nearly 60 percent of Iraqis, about 14 million people, depend entirely on government-provided food rations that, by international standards, represent the minimum for human sustenance. Unemployment is greater than 50 percent, and the majority of those who work earn between $4 and $8 a month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nicholas Thompson and Nicholas Thompson,Los Angeles Times | August 21, 2005
POLICY HOW THE IMPERIAL PRESIDENCY HIJACKED THE CONSTITUTION By Peter Irons. Metropolitan Books. 308 pages. Conservative judicial scholars love the Founding Fathers, and they have created a legal theory called "originalism" in which the founders' words essentially are carved in stone. If you're stuck with a complicated legal question, just think about what James Madison would do. "The Constitution means what the delegates of the Philadelphia Convention and of the state ratifying conventions understood it to mean; not what we judges think it should mean," Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas said in a 2001 speech.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 22, 2005
The reconstructed version of Sam Fuller's World War II movie The Big Red One plays the Charles tomorrow, Monday and Thursday and at a gala screening Thursday at the AFI Silver in Silver Spring. With 47 minutes added to its 116-minute release time, the movie is a must-see for devotees of war films - a revelation, if not exactly a masterwork. Twenty-five years ago, Fuller's film swam against a riptide of hits like The Empire Strikes Back and The Blues Brothers, buoyed only by the star power of a cast that includes the Star Wars saga's Mark Hamill and The Dirty Dozen's Lee Marvin.
NEWS
October 3, 2003
THE STICKING POINT when it comes to a doctrine of pre-emptive war is that in almost every conceivable instance such a war would have to be based on intelligence (of the spycraft kind) - on knowing what the chosen enemy was up to. And the problem with intelligence - as David Kay's report to Congress yesterday on the continuing search for Iraq's weapons of mass destruction should remind us - is that it isn't always right. That intelligence can sometimes be wrong is further clouded by another problem: The public generally has only the haziest idea of the nature of the intelligence that the White House is receiving.
TOPIC
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
We think of war and we think of airplanes. But when Orville and Wilbur Wright invented the airplane a century ago, they did not envision massive aerial bombardments of "shock and awe." In fact, the Ohio brothers once thought their invention would become the great deterrent to warfare. It was an idea shared by many after the inception of flight. War would become practically impossible, the brothers thought, because the scouting done by aircraft would equalize opposing nations with information on each other's movements, preventing surprise attacks.
NEWS
By Charlie Clements | March 7, 2003
I RECENTLY returned from an emergency public health mission to Iraq where I helped assess the consequences of a war on the civilian population, which has in many ways been reduced to the status of refugees. Nearly 60 percent of Iraqis, about 14 million people, depend entirely on government-provided food rations that, by international standards, represent the minimum for human sustenance. Unemployment is greater than 50 percent, and the majority of those who work earn between $4 and $8 a month.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 25, 2002
PARIS - The first prediction from the political science students here, some of the brightest young adults in the world, is presented without wavering. Yes, they agree, all 30 of them, the United States is going to use its military against Iraq regardless of what the rest of the world wants. And, again without dissent, they say that would be a mistake. But what should the United States do about Saddam Hussein? What should the rest of the world do when it sees the United States as arrogant, and, more important, when it disagrees with its course?
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | January 25, 1991
Lund, Sweden. Last year was too good to be true. Not only did it bring the end of the Cold War but it was the first time in 31 years that no new hot war had started. But now, so soon into the New Year, we are on the familiar treadmill again.There have been 127 wars in the 46 years since the end of the Second World War. At the peak, in 1987, 27 wars were under way, the most since 1700. On average, the annual war-inflicted death toll has been five times greater in this century than the last and eight times greater than the 18th.
NEWS
October 3, 2003
THE STICKING POINT when it comes to a doctrine of pre-emptive war is that in almost every conceivable instance such a war would have to be based on intelligence (of the spycraft kind) - on knowing what the chosen enemy was up to. And the problem with intelligence - as David Kay's report to Congress yesterday on the continuing search for Iraq's weapons of mass destruction should remind us - is that it isn't always right. That intelligence can sometimes be wrong is further clouded by another problem: The public generally has only the haziest idea of the nature of the intelligence that the White House is receiving.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | June 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California was not pleased with the president's speech at West Point, in which he outlined the necessity for pre-emption against nations or groups that threaten this country. "I think this is a predicate for an attack on Iraq," the perceptive Democrat explained, "and I'm very concerned about it. I think it would be a terrible mistake for the United States unilaterally to attack Iraq, and to do so without any congressional authorization." Eleven years ago, we had a similar debate, about the same enemy, with a president of the same name.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | April 21, 2002
At some point, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon will say that his "Operation Defensive Shield" is over. By then, presumably, all suspected Palestinian militants will have been rounded up, Palestinian weapons will have been confiscated, the remaining Palestinian inhabitants of the West Bank will be left to rummage in the ruins of Ramallah, Nablus, Jenin, Tulkarm and elsewhere, the Palestinian fighters in Bethlehem's Church of the Nativity will have...
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