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SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht | August 7, 1997
Highlights: Middle linebacker Ray Lewis, making a gradual return from a neck injury he suffered nine days ago, worked in seven-on-seven drills. Lewis could return to action in next week's third preseason game in Philadelphia. The Ravens claimed offensive lineman Craig Novitsky off waivers from the St. Louis Rams. Novitsky, a fourth-year player from UCLA, is expected to become the backup center behind Quentin Neujahr.Today: The players have a 9 a.m. walk-through and depart for New York at 1 p.m.Injury report: TE Eric Green, who has missed a handful of practices with recurring knee soreness, left practice after he injured a finger.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 13, 2014
After reading Chris Davis' apologetic statement on his suspension from the Orioles for taking a drug he wasn't allowed to take under the rules of Major League Baseball, I had to look up the word "mistake. " A "mistake" is what Davis said he made. His manager, an Orioles broadcaster and a teammate used the word as well. "I made a mistake by taking Adderall," Davis said. "We all make mistakes," said Buck Showalter. "The big boy made a mistake," said Joe Angel, one of the voices of the Orioles on radio.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2005
For the first time in 15 years, someone besides John Force or one of his drivers is leading the NHRA Funny Car standings after the U.S. Nationals. It is Gary Scelzi who holds a one-point advantage coming into the Toyo Tires NHRA Nationals at Maple Grove Raceway in Reading, Pa., this weekend. Competition begins tomorrow, with the title runs on Sunday. And it is Scelzi who will have his hands full holding off Robert Hight, Ron Capps, Force and Eric Medlen. The top five drivers are all within 55 points with five races left in the season.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | February 16, 2014
I used to get blamed all the time for stuff Bob Steinback said. To be fair, it wasn't always blame -- sometimes it was credit -- and it went both ways. Sometimes, he had to explain to people that it was not he who had written a certain thing, but me. Robert L. Steinback was, as I was and still am, a columnist for The Miami Herald, and and we shared a certain superficial physical similarity, both of us bearded, bald and black. That said, we really didn't look a lot alike. For one thing, I wear glasses and Bob doesn't.
NEWS
October 6, 1992
Now that the Kanasco Ltd. pharmaceutical plant in Brooklyn Park faces criminal prosecution for a 1991 chemical spill, environmental officials should start thinking about what to do the next time Kanasco's permits come up for renewal.The recent indictments, coupled with a $25,000 civil penalty proposed by the Maryland Department of the Environment, are not the end of the Kanasco saga. Though the company faces criminal fines up to $200,000, there is no guarantee it will have to pay that much, if convicted.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2000
In the wake of a 15-point loss Sunday in Richmond, the BayRunners fired coach Herb Brown yesterday, citing a need to turn things around. Assistant coach Terry Truax will serve as head coach for the remainder of the season. Sam Worthen will remain as an assistant coach. The BayRunners (10-20) hold the last playoff spot in the Eastern Division of the International Basketball League by two games over the Rhythm. But the team is 1-4 in its last five games, including a home loss to St. Louis last Friday in which it trailed by as many as 30. "I just don't know if the proper flow was found," BayRunners president Greg Smith said.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | December 23, 1990
This Christmas, let's give ourselves and every working woman we know a couple of precious gifts. Wrap them carefully and put them under the tree.First, let's give ourselves -- and others -- the gift of unconditional acceptance. It's time we stopped feeling as if we have to defend the choices we make -- to work in our homes or away from home, hold part-time jobs or demanding careers, marry or remain single, bear children or not, live in the city or the suburbs, etc.Then let's give ourselves a well-deserved pat on the back for all the things we do right.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | September 27, 1990
Marty Winebrenner understands that people make mistakes. He can accept that.The part he has trouble with is that his only child, Billy, is dead -- because of a mistake by the Maryland correction system that allowed the early release of the man now accused of killing his son and two others."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | September 27, 2000
Would you like to find some extra money? Jordan Goodman, author of "Everyone's Money Book," says, "Every pay period thousands of people get less than they should. ... Check the following:"(1) Are you having too much tax withheld? If the IRS refunds you hundreds of dollars each year, you're having too much withheld. Why make an interest-free loan to Uncle Sam?"(2) Is your firm paying your full salary? Employers can make mistakes - especially small firms that don't use an outside payroll service."
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | November 26, 2000
DIMPLED chads. Pregnant chads. Hanging chads. Undercounts. Overcounts. Butterflies. This is the language of election aficionados. They're a small group, but they wield mighty power every time there's a close election. We've gotten an education on how voting is conducted and how votes are counted. It's been a comprehensive civics lesson, despite inflammatory background noise from win-at-any-cost political supporters of Al Gore and George W. Bush. Listening to the Rush Limbaugh crowd, you'd think Democratic Boss Tweed had risen from the grave to hijack Florida's presidential ballots and perpetrated a massive fraud.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
The Baltimore office of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is the slowest in the country in processing disability claims for servicemen and servicewomen - averaging about a year - and makes more mistakes than any other office. The failures locally are a symptom of a national breakdown: Across the country, more than 900,000 veterans wait an average of nine months for the agency to determine whether they qualify for disability benefits, according to the VA. Even as the VA says it is working to fix problems in Baltimore and nationwide, Paul Rieckhoff, founder of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, calls the situation "shameful.
NEWS
By Sandra Hofferth | July 15, 2013
Here's another reason the dysfunctional federal budget process is bad for Americans: besides hurting the economy and hitting us in the pocketbook, partisan feuding over budget cuts could undermine our health and even shorten our lives. That's because House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and others in Congress have been using the budget process to target research in the behavioral and social sciences for elimination, even though they're indispensable to understanding and improving Americans' health.
NEWS
May 30, 2013
How ironic to read the Home Builders' lobbyist remark that fees for waiving open space requirements for new developments were so high that it was more profitable to actually set aside the open space ("Balto. Co. Council lowers open-space fees for developers," May 23)! That means the fees were appropriately designed to encourage compliance with the law, which intends to offset the loss of open space that occurs when a new development is constructed. But the Home Builders successfully lobbied the Baltimore County Council to "fix" these fees, cutting them by nearly 90 percent in rural areas.
NEWS
May 22, 2013
I grew up in Dundalk and began my career in recreation, parks, and conservation with the Baltimore County Department of Recreation and Parks. My career took me to Harford County and Los Angeles. I came home to Baltimore County in 1995 as the director of Recreation and Parks. Throughout my career, I worked with staff, elected officials, volunteers and numerous citizen organizations in the purchase and development of neighborhood, community and regional parks, and I do not understand how our current Baltimore County government can decide to sell off a major community park for development.
SPORTS
By Mike Klis and The Denver Post | January 13, 2013
It had nothing to do with the cold. It had nothing to do with the postseason. It had nothing to do with The Glove. It had everything to do with committing one of the most egregious sins of quarterbacking - throwing across the body. Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, who by his own admission can't throw the fastball like he used to, rolled right late in the first overtime Saturday, and tried to throw back left and complete a pass to Brandon Stokley. Manning's pass didn't get there.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | August 26, 2012
The Billy Cundiff haters - and there are enough in this town to hold several conventions - are celebrating today. About time the Ravens unloaded that choker, they're saying. Good riddance. Guy cost the Ravens a shot at the Super Bowl. How do you miss a 32-yard chip shot in the AFC championship game? And how do you come back from a disaster like that? They make Cundiff sound like he was a psychological wreck, like he did five tours of duty in Afghanistan on a bomb disposal squad.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | January 13, 2002
It didn't matter who threw the first punch in the brawl between Thomas Junta and Michael Costin in front of their children at a hockey rink in Reading, Mass. Costin was killed in the fray, and Junta was convicted Friday of involuntary manslaughter. What matters is that it happened at all. A lot of people who have spent time at youngsters' athletic competitions might be shocked, but not entirely surprised. Sooner or later, the seething passions that some spectators (many of them parents)
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | March 27, 2000
JUPITER, Fla. -- Matt Riley's vanity license plate says 24KTARM. His problem is his 10HEAD. Now that he has been arrested and demoted, the question is whether the Orioles' top pitching prospect has been humbled. Mike Mussina and B. J. Surhoff spoke repeatedly with Riley this spring about what it takes to achieve major-league success. Evidently, the 20-year-old left-hander wasn't listening. "He's receptive, yet he's skeptical," Mussina said yesterday. "I think he believes we don't understand what kind of person he is. The phrase, `Old school,' has come in a few times from him."
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
Orioles left hander Wei-Yin Chen's one critical mistake on Tuesday night came against the most unlikeliest of hitters. Chen held most of the Tampa Bay Rays lineup in check. The Rays didn't get their first hit off the Orioles starter until two outs in the fourth inning, and they had just two baserunners through the first four frames. But the Rays had their answer in light-hitting No. 9 hitter Brooks Conrad, a waiver claim a month ago, who had just two hits in his last 27 at-bats and was making his first start in 10 games.
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