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NEWS
September 5, 1991
Blackened eyes and bruises are nasty evidence of things gone wrong. But as more victims are unwilling to silently tolerate domestic violence, providers are overwhelmed with pleas for help. The House of Ruth, for example, served 400 women and children in its initial year in 1977. Last year, 8,000 individuals benefited from an array of programs that range from a shelter for 24 women and children to counseling and legal assistance for battered women as well as their mates.The House of Ruth is just one of more than 100 health and human service agencies supported by the United Way of Central Maryland, which kicks off its 1991 fund-raising campaign today.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's recent commentary on Maryland's 2013 Firearms Safety Act is disingenuous and deceitful ( "Brown: I will enforce gun safety law," Oct. 2). The law does nothing to make Marylander's safer. Maryland has had strict guns laws for the last 30 years, yet we are ranked the eighth most violent state according to U.S. Justice Department statistics. Nor did the law truly ban the sale of military style assault rifles; it banned a few models, but many "sporting rifles" with "assault style" features are still legally available.
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BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | October 31, 1994
One of the most exciting developments in years for the nonprofit sector is just now beginning to unfold in Maryland. A group of 40 volunteers, known as the Nonprofit Policy Agenda Project and coordinated by the Maryland Association of Nonprofit Organizations (Maryland Nonprofits), has just published the Partnership Platform 1995-1998. The report represents eighteen months of intense effort. Its release was timed to coincide with the current election campaigns.Maryland Nonprofits remains on the cutting edge of policy development for its members, which is critically important in today's fast-paced world.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Mattis | January 25, 2014
Maryland lawmakers on Monday introduced a bill to restrict the sale of tobacco products in the state to those age 21 and older instead of the current age of 18. If passed, that would make Maryland the strictest state in the nation when it comes to cigarette purchases. A few states have raised the tobacco buying age to 19, but no other state has reached the 21 marker, and only one city has: New York City last year passed a bill restricting the sale of tobacco to age 21; it goes into effect in April.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer said yesterday that he may lend his considerable clout to an effort to make Maryland the third state in the nation to ban military-style assault weapons."
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | March 23, 1994
ANNAPOLIS -- An attempt to make English the official language of Maryland, a perennial loser in the General Assembly, is getting serious consideration for the first time.An array of ethnic and human rights groups yesterday attacked the proposal, which would make Maryland the 20th state to adopt some form of "official English" legislation.Representatives of Latino, Asian, Native American and even deaf Marylanders who use American Sign Language led a news conference to brand House Bill 982 and its companion, Senate Bill 467, as discriminatory.
NEWS
August 15, 1999
TECHNOLOGY companies will play a major role in Maryland's future. That's why state officials have hired the top economic development official at the U.S. Department of Commerce to attract more technology companies.Phillip A. Singerman left his post as an assistant secretary at Commerce to begin what amounts to a start-up venture for Maryland. He will be the first president of the Maryland Science, Engineering and Technology Development Corp., known as TEDCO.The quasi-public group's purpose is to make Maryland a mecca for high-tech firms.
NEWS
November 26, 2008
The financial crisis that's affecting every sector of the economy, from home values to manufacturing to consumer spending, has taken its toll on the arts, too. Theaters, symphony orchestras, opera companies and museums have been hit by a triple whammy of falling box-office revenues, plummeting donations and shrinking endowments as the values of their stock portfolios decline. The Baltimore Sun's Tim Smith reported recently that some organizations are considering cutting expenses or trimming staff to weather the storm.
SPORTS
By Tara Finnegan | July 29, 1991
There were 34 of the best high-school football players in the state chosen for the Maryland Big 33 team.Most of them were playing together for the first time. But in a week's time, teamwork would prevail and Maryland would defeat Pennsylvania, 17-9, for the first time since 1987.Each of them carried away more than just the victory; he carried away a special friendship."They learned to appreciate people from different areas of the state and different walks of life to a certain extent," Doug DuVall, Maryland Big 33 coach and Wilde Lake High School football coach, said.
BUSINESS
By WILLIAM PATALON III | October 22, 2000
Inside the state, it's no secret that the Maryland of today is a much-improved version of the Maryland of a decade ago. But it's taken awhile for the economic makeover that created this "New Maryland" to finally get some recognition from outside the state. Just last week, for instance, Maryland earned high marks in the 14th annual "Development Report Card" created by the nonprofit Corporation for Enterprise Development, which tries to foster economic development by working with state and local government agencies, private companies and other organizations in various roles.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
Thanks to new restrictions passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley this year, Maryland is now in the top tier of states when it comes to the strength of its gun laws. It had been close to the top before, but now it ranks fourth, behind only California, Connecticut and New Jersey, according to a new report from the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence and the Brady Campaign. Another part of the report demonstrates why moving up a few slots was important: Unlike most of the top 10 states for gun laws, Maryland is not among the lowest for gun deaths.
NEWS
By Andrea Purse | October 7, 2013
Living in Maryland, these days, it's not hard to hang our hats on many points of pride. As a mom living in the state, I have enjoyed all that Maryland has to offer for kids: fantastic museums in Baltimore, the Terrapin football games on Saturday afternoons, and the beautiful farm pumpkin patches as we move more deeply into fall. But today we have even more good news for moms and families in Maryland: a new study shows that women in Maryland are in a better position to live healthy and economically secure lives than women in any other state.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
Was anyone surprised by how many drivers were caught using hand-held cellphones on Tuesday by police in Maryland? Surely, only those who weren't aware that Maryland's ban on putting phone to ear while driving had gone from a secondary offense (ticketed only when a vehicle is pulled over for some other violation) to a primary one. That police had little trouble finding offenders - as well as adults in the back seat who failed to use seat belts (now a secondary offense) - demonstrated precisely why the new laws were needed in the first place.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Perhaps the ultimate tribute to the strong and well considered gun control measures that go into effect in Maryland tomorrow is the tepid challenge gun rights advocates have made to them. Months after announcing that they would not seek to petition the law to referendum - a nod to the inevitable, given polls showing that 80 percent of Marylanders support the law's provisions - gun advocates filed a pair of lawsuits last week seeking to block implementation of two elements: a ban on assault weapons and high capacity magazines and a requirement that handgun purchasers obtain a license and provide their fingerprints to the Maryland State Police.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
When it comes to accessing public information, the Free State isn't all that free. The law requires state and local government agencies to make records of all kinds available to the public, and although it is allowed certain exceptions, the government is supposed to err on the side of disclosure. But in practice, requests under Maryland's Public Information Act are routinely subject to delays, responses are frequently incomplete and the fees charged for accessing material every Marylander is supposed to have a right to see are often arbitrary and excessive.
NEWS
By Benjamin Todd Jealous | June 2, 2013
The death penalty debate in Maryland is finally over. This spring's decision by the General Assembly to replace the death penalty with life without parole was cemented last week, when right-wing activists failed to muster enough signatures to force the issue onto the ballot. We, the people of Maryland, have sent a clear and firm message: capital punishment belongs in our past, not our future. In doing so, we have joined New Jersey, New York, New Mexico, Illinois and Connecticut as the sixth state in six years and 18th in the nation to abolish the death penalty.
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1997
The Maryland Technology Showcase, the state's annual exhibit of high-tech goods and services, is set to kick off this week with a new venue, a new managerial team and big expectations.This year the showcase -- the third -- is moving to the Baltimore Convention Center, where it will stretch out over 240,000 square feet in three rooms. In addition, the state is using a private company, American Show Management Inc. of Portland, Ore., to manage and plan the show, which will have more than 300 exhibits, including displays devoted to education, career opportunities and online government services.
NEWS
February 10, 1995
Due to a problem in typesetting, there was a garbled line in the Friday editorial "Brady for Maryland's Economy." The line should have read that a top priority for James T. Brady's economic-development team is persuading Dr. Robert C. Gallo "to locate a world-class virology laboratory at the University of Maryland instead of Virginia."The Sun regrets the error.Gov. Parris N. Glendening picked wisely in selecting Baltimore business executive James T. Brady as his top economic development aide yesterday.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
Surrounded by religious leaders, civil rights activists and others who have fought for years to stop executions in Maryland, Gov. Martin O'Malley signed legislation Thursday repealing the state's death penalty. Unless the law is overturned in a referendum, Maryland will become the 18th state to end capital punishment, leaving life without parole as the maximum penalty for any crime. "We have a responsibility to stop doing those things that are wasteful and ineffective," O'Malley, a Democrat, said before putting pen to paper.
NEWS
By Sierra Gladfelter | April 14, 2013
After protesting at a nearby coal plant in 2008 and becoming discouraged with his own dependence on unsustainable energy, Charles County Commissioner Ken Robinson decided to build a wind generator on his coastal property and get off the grid. He became the first individual in Southern Maryland to build one on his land. After Mr. Robinson made the rounds to neighbors, the community embraced his idea. "Only slightly taller than a flag pole," the 33-foot turbine produces 30 percent to 40 percent of Mr. Robinson's power.
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