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By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | March 5, 2006
Back when personal computers first started to appear, there were predictions that we were witnessing the dawning of yet another Age of Aquarius. Maybe it was the fledgling computer industry's proximity to San Francisco that caused many early proponents to foresee the electronic Web binding us together in worldwide e-community, blurring distinctions based on nationality, ethnicity, race, sex, age or the other factors that divide us. Next thing you know,...
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
The committee tasked with filing a vacant City Council seat listened to more than four hours of testimony Tuesday evening from 14 candidates with a wide range of experiences. But when it came time to debate their relative merits, there was little discussion. The committee voted on only one candidate - Eric T. Costello, 33, the president of the Federal Hill Neighborhood Association - and approved him by an 11-2 vote, after considering the matter for less than five minutes. "I'm humbled and honored at the opportunity," said Costello, an information technology auditor in the U.S. Government Accountability Office.
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NEWS
By Linda MacMurray Gibbs | October 11, 1990
SCADS of articles have appeared in the press recently on proposed reforms in education, all pointing toward a new era of "school-based management." In this scenario, the principal is the central leader of the school, empowered to make decisions and take action without needing approval from a central office. The rationale is sound, based on the concept that decisions are most informed at the school level, where knowledge of the circumstances is greatest.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
After spending more than two hours last week listening to critics, farmer Edwin Fry said he's open to suggestions of how he might be able to keep the former Navy Academy dairy farm in Gambrills an organic operation. Fry, who leases the land for his Maryland Sunrise Farm, is planning to give up his organic certification from the U.S. Department of Agriculture in order to battle weeds, erosion and other problems on the farm. "I'm open to ideas. I'm not trying to be hard-headed about it," Fry told a crowd of more than 100 people who gathered Tuesday night at a small Baptist church across the street from the farm.
NEWS
By Susan Schoenberger | October 3, 1990
Decentralizing Baltimore's schools is an idea whose time may come -- but not just yet. That was the prevailing view.About 75 parents, educators and community members who attended a public hearing at the Polytechnic Institute last night said they generally supported the plan, which would put most decision-making at the school level within three years. But they said the board was moving too fast in deciding on a major reconfiguration of the school system's structure.Several speakers asked the board to delay a decision on the plan, which it had hoped to make this month, to give parents more time to digest the plan's implications.
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | February 16, 1991
A clear majority of elderly Americans oppose the use of life-sustaining medical technologies to prolong their lives, but most have neither signed living wills nor appointed someone to act on their behalf, two new studies indicate.A study of 103 residents at a Rockville nursing home reported that most of them did not want their lives extended by the use of respirators or feeding tubes.Ninety percent of the residents said that if necessary, they would choose a relative to make their health-care decisions for them.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | June 26, 2005
Wall Street wants to delve deep inside the minds of Main Street investors. But will it use this powerful information for good? In a string of announcements this spring, the educational arm of the NASD, formerly known as the National Association of Securities Dealers, granted more than $500,000 to researchers studying investors' psychological and gender biases, their susceptibility to fraud and their optimal learning strategies. The grants represent growing acceptance of behavioral finance, the field of study that attempts to explain how emotions and judgment color investment choices.
NEWS
By David M. Anderson | February 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - I can't make up my mind about whether the United States should go to war with Iraq, and I don't feel dumb, guilty or inadequate about it. It's not part of my job to make decisions about U.S. foreign policy. But am I a bad citizen because I'm ambivalent about this historic choice facing our nation's leaders? It's not as though I've evaded the topic. I've read hundreds of articles in numerous papers, listened to many commentators on radio and TV and spoken extensively with friends, colleagues and family members.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | January 18, 1991
The Howard County Council came out yesterday against provisions of an open meetings bill now before the General Assembly that would require decision-making sessions of the zoning and liquor boards to be conducted in public.Council members agreed with the acting county solicitor, Barbara M. Cook, who warned them that the measure "would drive you off to the men's room and ladies' room to make decisions.""It will have a chilling effect, and board members will be afraid to persuade other members and be inclined not to talk when they have all the people staring at them," she said.
NEWS
June 15, 1996
A 6-YEAR-OLD hyperactive elementary student who assaulted his teacher and vice principal was cuffed by a visiting policeman this week, and his parents, a school board member and children's advocates have raised the specter of abuse. But there are no villains in this story.It is one thing, days afterward, to say what should have been done, and quite another to make decisions in an emergency. Immediate steps had to be taken to ensure the safety of the child and others. The policeman intervened with that intention.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2014
FRISCO, Texas -- Towson running back Terrance West expressed frustration Friday about  reports stating he will skip his senior year and declare for the NFL draft after the team's clash with North Dakota State in the Football Championship Subdivision title game at Toyota Stadium on Saturday at 2 p.m. The Baltimore native and Northwestern graduate disputed the report, which originated from a website called Campus SportsNet. “I didn't say it,” West said after the team had finished a news conference at the stadium.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Sometimes it's easier to put these things into a question-and-answer format, and since I've gotten a bunch of questions from readers about what's next for the Orioles and their pitching coach situation, that's what we'll do. If you want to take a look at potential candidates, check out this piece that ran Friday morning. What type/style of pitching coach will the Orioles seek? My sense is they are looking for experience. Manager Buck Showalter has a rather experienced staff, and I think he'll add to that with someone who has already done the job in the majors.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Maryland coach Randy Edsall said he hopes to make a decision within the next several days on which quarterback will back up starter C.J. Brown. Brown remained on the sidelines today so that Edsall could evaluate Caleb Rowe, Ricardo Young and Perry Hills. “I wanted to see Ricardo, Perry and Caleb because I have no idea right now who is our No. 2 quarterback,” the coach said. “Nobody has really separated themselves, so I thought it would be a good day today just to get those guys involved with the first unit.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2013
Just a day after being released by the Ravens earlier this month, Pro Bowl fullback Vonta Leach was on a plane to Miami for a visit with the Dolphins. At the time, it didn't appear that one of the league's best lead blockers would be a free agent for long. However, nearly two weeks later, he's still on the market and Leach acknowledged in a radio interview today that he's in no rush to sign and he's still in regular contact with his former team. "Me and [Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome ]
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Larry Perl, Baltimore Sun Media Group | February 12, 2013
The Baltimore school board voted Tuesday night to not renew the contracts of several charter and other independently run schools — but deferred making decisions about whether most of them would close. In January, city schools CEO Andrés Alonso recommended closing four independently operated schools and bringing two other schools under district control, after a review of their progress concluded they had failed to live up to their promise. Some had low test scores while others had financial problems.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2013
Ray Lewis' last hurrah with the Ravens opened with a packed news conference on Jan. 2, was punctuated by his last dance in front of fans at M&T Bank Stadium four days later, and has led to a number of rallying cries citing his "last ride" comment. Matt Birk has witnessed it all, and the Ravens center said he doesn't expect that kind of farewell when he decides to retire. "A guy like Ray Lewis, you send him off properly - press conferences, all that stuff," Birk said after Friday's practice.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 10, 2002
In the second round of prizes to be awarded yesterday, two Americans won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for trying to explain idiosyncrasies in how people make decisions - research that is at the nexus of psychology and economics. Daniel Kahneman, a professor of psychology at Princeton University, who is also a citizen of Israel, and Vernon L. Smith, a professor of economics and law at George Mason University in Virginia, shared the $1 million prize. The standard theory of choice propounded by economists assumes that individuals make decisions systematically, based on their preferences and available information, in a way that changes little with time or context.
NEWS
October 5, 1993
It's never easy facing choices about life and death. But increasing numbers of Americans are encountering the singular anguish of deciding whether to remove life support equipment from a relative or to stop artificially administering the essential nutrients. This month Maryland joined the front ranks of states grappling in a comprehensive way with the choices that face families and with how those choices should be made.Maryland's Health Care Decision Act, which took effect Oct. 1, updates the state's laws on advance directives -- documents that allow people to state in advance their wishes about life-prolonging medical treatment.
SPORTS
By Mike Klis and The Denver Post | January 13, 2013
It had nothing to do with the cold. It had nothing to do with the postseason. It had nothing to do with The Glove. It had everything to do with committing one of the most egregious sins of quarterbacking - throwing across the body. Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning, who by his own admission can't throw the fastball like he used to, rolled right late in the first overtime Saturday, and tried to throw back left and complete a pass to Brandon Stokley. Manning's pass didn't get there.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | January 6, 2013
Like Ed Reed, Matt Birk has a decision to make about his future with the Ravens. And like the free safety, the 15-year center declined to say whether he envisioned playing out the final two years of his contract. “I don't know,” he said. “I'm worried about what I'm going to eat at dinner tonight. I don't make any decision until I have to. That's my motto.” Birk, 36, made his 113th consecutive start in Sunday's 24-9 victory over the Indianapolis Colts in the AFC Wildcard playoff round.
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