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NEWS
January 3, 2014
That was a good editorial on the expansion of MARC commuter rail service, but I have to echo the sentiment of some of my fellow MARC monthly ticket holders at the loss of our access to Amtrak on the weekends ( "Weekends on the MARC," Jan. 2). Amtrak used to honor MARC monthly tickets on selected Amtrak trains between Washington and Baltimore on weekends. While the Maryland Transit Administration paid for this access, it seems unfortunate the MTA couldn't have at least negotiated a "step up" fare option where these ticket holders could pay a little extra and ride an express train between D.C. and Baltimore (Amtrak only makes two stops)
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FEATURES
January 6, 1991
IS BALTIMORE THE CITY OF YOUR DREAMS?Maybe it is, maybe it isn't. But it's a good bet that if any of us had the chance, there are things we would change to make Baltimore more like the city we'd prefer it to be.How would you improve Baltimore? What modifications would you make? In our Nov. 4 issue, we asked our readers for their suggestions. Following are 25 of the best ideas we received.POOPER PATROL To upgrade the quality of Baltimore city life, I suggest the following: There should be a number of unmarked citizen patrol cars with four strong men inside.
NEWS
By Jill Pardini | June 4, 2012
"Welcome to America. " It's a traditional greeting that implicitly embodies notions of acceptance, hope and opportunity. But that simple phrase can also be used as a taunt, as I witnessed during a youth soccer game in Baltimore where the teams were starkly divided by race, religion and language. "Welcome to America" served as a derisive cheer hurled across the field when the fairer-skinned team scored against a team made up of refugees and asylum seekers from Nepal, Bhutan, Iraq, Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia, Eritrea, Tanzania and Guinea.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake is quietly enabling the City Council's destruction of public safety. From the perspectives of both the public and the police and fire department employees, safety within the city is crumbling. All one needs to do is look to the numbers for the proof. Mayor Rawlings-Blake took office on February 4, 2010. From the date of taking office to August 24, 2010, murder rates were up 4% compared to the same time period in 2009 for her predecessor Sheila Dixon.
NEWS
By Keith Losoya | August 9, 2007
The only sure things in Baltimore are crime and taxes. But since all of our local candidates are focusing on crime, I wanted to take a moment to cry out into the urban wilderness about taxes. Like migrating birds, it seems as if every three years Baltimoreans can be seen climbing up to their rooftops to protest inflated assessments, only to go back into their nests to mournfully mull their situation. But unlike the recent past, where the patience to bear heavy tax burdens was sustained by the promise of ever-increasing home values, I fear the fortitude of taxpaying families in Baltimore is waning.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | January 2, 2014
In a New Year's Day editorial, the Sun editorial board lamented that 2013 was " a lost year in the fight against gun crime . " There is plenty wrong, of course, with how Baltimore City handles gun crime. The lack of seriousness with which the Rawlings-Blake administration seems to address gun crimes as compared to other issues is of great concern. When City Police Chief Anthony Batts says that "everyday citizens" had no reason to worry about gun crimes since 80-85 percent of the victims were African-Americans involved in the drug trade, that shows that he is not competent enough to be running a precinct, much like the police department of one of the most dangerous major cities in America.
FEATURES
November 18, 1990
THE SUN MAGAZINE IS LOOKING FOR A FEW good idea from its readers on how to make Baltimore a better place. We plan to publish the best ideas in the first issue of 1991. Ideas -- in 200 words or less, please -- may range from whimsical to serious. Send your typewritten suggestions, postmarked no later than Nov. 30, to Making Baltimore Better, The Sun Magazine, Box 1377, Baltimore, Md. 21278. Please include your name, address and daytime phone number.
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | January 18, 1998
The Ford Center, one of the renovated theaters on New York's 42nd Street, had an informal opening back in November. After I inspected its lobby, walked up a fancy staircase, admired a new floor mosaic, and gazed at that grand proscenium arch, I thought: "Why can't Baltimore have this too?"The Greater Baltimore Committee and the Downtown Partnership feel the same way, as do thousands of nameless Baltimoreans who grow pleased and proud when one of their landmarks of civic patrimony is saved, restored and appreciated.
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