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By DAN BERGER | September 30, 1993
Either catch Mohamed Farah Aidid, or make a movie about him!Mrs. Clinton ought to go to the Hill any time Bill needs a job done there.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | June 14, 2009
A record number of teams, 53 as of Friday afternoon, are out frantically making movies in and around Baltimore this weekend, part of the annual exercise in creative cinematic anarchy otherwise known as the 48-Hour Film Project. "There will be at least 500 people out on the streets," said Rob Hatch, project organizer for Baltimore. "If they're aiming something at you, it's just a camera." Under the competition's rules, teams of filmmakers have exactly 48 hours to make a film between four and seven minutes long.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
John Waters always bases his films in Baltimore, has already made a film about a teen dance show, is hardly the kind of guy who'd stage a press conference at Planet Hollywood and has never met a would-be screenwriter named Ben Castro.So what was Castro doing at the New Orleans Planet Hollywood last month, announcing that his screenplay, "Electric Carousel: The Movie," about the rise and fall of a New Orleans dance show, would be made into a film starring Judd Nelson and directed by Baltimore's favorite cult film director?
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 24, 2007
A man who made a fortune dressing women in black and white can afford to dream in Technicolor. Rick Sarmiento, the former Baltimore Hyatt manager who launched The White House/Black Market clothing chain in 1985, has undergone another professional metamorphosis - into movie mogul. Sarmiento sold the clothing chain to Chico's in 2003 and went on to start a movie company on Kent Island, where he lives. SarcoFilms just produced its first film, Heavy Petting, a romantic comedy written and directed by Sarmiento's nephew, Marcel Sarmiento.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | July 19, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- The movie Ted Turner hoped to make on Donald Trump appears to have gone the way of the former mogul's marriage to Ivana."Donald is kind of a fluid target right now," Scott Sassa, president of the Turner Entertainment Networks, said of Trump."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 12, 2001
For a guy who makes a pretty good living off Hollywood, David Mamet sure loves biting the hand that feeds him Four years ago, he managed to skew the worlds of both cinema and politics by co-writing "Wag the Dog," a biting political satire that suggested the line between Washington reality and Hollywood unreality can be uncomfortably blurry. And now he's back with "State and Main," a snarling satire of Hollywood single-mindedness and its lack of any moral underpinning. The result is a frequently hilarious look at the lengths to which studios will go to make a movie, a pointed commentary on a society where filmmakers are held in way-too-high esteem and a chance for some fine actors to show that they can take, as well as make, a joke.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | May 20, 1993
The main character in Howard Korder's "Search and Destroy is obsessed by a desire to make a movie. It's a particularly telling plot point since this extremely episodic script seems obsessed with becoming a movie.Of course, movies get away with being episodic because they have the technical capacity to dissolve the time and space between scenes. Not so on stage. And as directed by John Blair and designed by Tony Colavito, the elaborate set changes in Fells Point Corner Theatre's production expand the time between scenes instead of dissolving it.Colavito's obsession seems to have been designing convertible pieces of scenery -- a desk becomes a bus seat becomes a car, etc. However, the one constant element in his set is an accurate, if somewhat literal, representation of the play's central theme.
NEWS
By JOE MURRAY | November 27, 1992
Angelina County, Texas. -- I wish they'd make a movie called ''Inez X,'' all about a hero of the civil-rights movement.This movie would take place in my little hometown of Lufkin, Texas. The first thing you'd find out was that Inez was a man, not a woman. The name would always be a problem for him, but not his biggest problem. His biggest problem was that he was a man who was black.I think I would want to begin the movie with Inez pushing a broom at the foundry, a job he had most of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Byron and Ken Byron,Hartford Courant | March 21, 2004
As claims to fame go, saying you've cornered the market in killer-tree movies is not a big brag. Yet that is what Andrew Gernhard and Michael Pleckaitis have spent the past several years doing. Since 1999, the Bristol, Conn., filmmakers have produced two feature-length movies -- Trees, released in 2000, and The Root of All Evil, which will make its premiere this weekend in Connecticut. Tomorrow the world? The unlikely stars of these movies are Christmas-tree-size white pines that come to life, sprout legs, go on killing sprees and generally terrorize the small, fictional town of Hazelville.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | October 24, 2007
A man who made a fortune dressing women in black and white can afford to dream in Technicolor. Rick Sarmiento, the former Baltimore Hyatt manager who launched The White House/Black Market clothing chain in 1985, has undergone another professional metamorphosis - into movie mogul. Sarmiento sold the clothing chain to Chico's in 2003 and went on to start a movie company on Kent Island, where he lives. SarcoFilms just produced its first film, Heavy Petting, a romantic comedy written and directed by Sarmiento's nephew, Marcel Sarmiento.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | April 24, 2007
It appeared that another body was about to turn cold on a hot summer night in East Baltimore. A middle-aged man stood tense as three dozen young men surrounded him in a back alley. He recognized a handful of them as the group he had earlier shooed away from loitering. They had returned for revenge - with reinforcements. "We'll shoot you in the face!" they shouted as some seemed to reach for concealed weapons. Just then, two patrol cars showed up. Everyone froze while police stared at the confrontation - and also at a track of spotlights on a nearby rooftop, loads of cable wire and someone barbecuing a few feet away.
FEATURES
By The Denver Post | April 20, 2007
Check the most recent entries on actor Ryan Gosling's career dance card: Young heartthrob in a treacly romance that critics loathed and the public loved. Cokehead teacher in one of the cheapest and most depressing indie films of 2006. Cocky district attorney opposite murderous Anthony Hopkins in a police-procedural genre movie opening today. "If anything, I've been painted with this `independent, brooding actor' brush," said Gosling, who was nominated for a best-actor Oscar in January for playing that addicted instructor in Half Nelson.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2006
Chris Robinson had been offered the kind of film scripts you would expect an award-winning director of rap and hip-hop videos to receive -- action movies, violent movies, comedies. All predictable, none worthwhile. A native of Harford County, Robinson wanted his first feature film to be like the movies he grew up watching and loving -- films like Diner and Do the Right Thing. He didn't want to make a movie about thugs, and he didn't want to make a movie that was little more than explosions and car chases.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 1, 2004
Here's probably the only fact you need to know about JimmyO and April Monique Burril: They were married on Halloween 1998 in costume. She was dressed as some sort of demented fairy-type thing, he as a werewolf. Need another fact? Try this one: They've made a movie together, Chainsaw Sally, that has nothing to do with chopping wood. Yep, they're one of those couples. "In this neighborhood, we're definitely the weirdos on the corner," says April, 32, chatting amiably at the dining-room table of their Perryville home, an unassuming end-of-the-row duplex a stone's heave from where the Susquehanna River flows through town.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Byron and Ken Byron,Hartford Courant | March 21, 2004
As claims to fame go, saying you've cornered the market in killer-tree movies is not a big brag. Yet that is what Andrew Gernhard and Michael Pleckaitis have spent the past several years doing. Since 1999, the Bristol, Conn., filmmakers have produced two feature-length movies -- Trees, released in 2000, and The Root of All Evil, which will make its premiere this weekend in Connecticut. Tomorrow the world? The unlikely stars of these movies are Christmas-tree-size white pines that come to life, sprout legs, go on killing sprees and generally terrorize the small, fictional town of Hazelville.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 19, 2003
A tale of strangers igniting sparks in a strange land, Lost in Translation amounts to beautiful frustration. The talented young writer-director Sofia Coppola (The Virgin Suicides) conceives her second picture as a Tokyo-set duet between Scarlett Johansson as a neglected newlywed and Bill Murray as an over-the-hill movie star with a moribund marriage back home. But this movie registers like a pop song that enters the mind only in fragments because, as a whole, it lacks the style or substance to be memorable.
FEATURES
By The Denver Post | April 20, 2007
Check the most recent entries on actor Ryan Gosling's career dance card: Young heartthrob in a treacly romance that critics loathed and the public loved. Cokehead teacher in one of the cheapest and most depressing indie films of 2006. Cocky district attorney opposite murderous Anthony Hopkins in a police-procedural genre movie opening today. "If anything, I've been painted with this `independent, brooding actor' brush," said Gosling, who was nominated for a best-actor Oscar in January for playing that addicted instructor in Half Nelson.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | March 13, 1993
The funniest thing about the alien abduction movie "Fire in th Sky" is that nobody involved gives a damn about being abducted by aliens. They want to make a movie about the pathologies of small-town life, about working-class men entrapped in something they don't understand and struggling to deal with it, about change, turmoil and suspicion. And they do an excellent job.Then the alien stuff kicks in and the movie just deflates like a pricked balloon.Reportedly based on a true story, the movie follows the results in Snow Flake, Ariz.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 5, 2002
Last Orders has the most improbably beautiful climax in contemporary movies: Four blokes fighting gusts and drizzle as they soldier down the sea walk in Margate, England, to empty an urn into the windswept waters. By then, the writer-director, Fred Schepisi, working from Graham Swift's Booker Prize-winning novel, has revealed the earthy gallantry within these life-worn friends. And he's unfolded their group sacraments so fully we sense the presence of the pal who isn't there as they commit his ashes to the deep.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 29, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Perhaps it's the rough Bronx accent with its blustery crescendos that jab the air like one-two punches. Or the brusque facade that many have long associated with the cantankerous characters he's played, like Murphy Brown's boss Stan Lansing in the 1990s TV sitcom. Director Garry Marshall doesn't come across as a romantic spinner of fairy tales. But with box-office triumphs ranging from Pretty Woman to Runaway Bride, that's exactly what he's been -- a writer, actor and director who has pooh-poohed these increasingly cynical times and stuck to his belief that life on the big screen should always be better than reality.
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