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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
MAJURO, Republic of the Marshall Islands -- There is precious little to this island nation, a family of dots sprinkled onto the Pacific halfway between Hawaii and Australia.No misty volcanic mountains, no rugged seaside cliffs or deep tropical jungles. Only a handful of delicate coral atolls, like jade necklaces, are flung across 2 million square miles of blue ocean.The atolls' slender islands are capped by coconut palms and surrounded by reefs. You can walk across any of them in just a few minutes.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | October 26, 1997
For more than a year now, doctors at the University of Maryland at Baltimore have been working to help the Marshall Islands devise a health care system better than the wreck left behind after 40 years of U.S. trusteeship over the islands."
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NEWS
October 5, 1997
Veteran of invasion recalls MajuroSun staff reporter Frank D. Roylance made my day with his ''Sun Journal'' report and photograph on the current status of Majuro atoll in the Marshall Islands of the Pacific (Sept. 14). However, Mr. Roylance omits any reference to what occurred there during World War II.On Jan. 31, 1944, as a member of a naval assault beach party, together with the 105th Battalion of the Army's 27th Division, I landed on Majuro.This was the best invasion of the nine in which I participated.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | October 26, 1997
MAJURO, Republic of the Marshall Islands -- Nature blessed the Marshall Islands with warm Pacific breezes, tropical fruits, schooling fish and turquoise lagoons.But a half-century of U.S. control and influence here since World War II has cursed them with illness and crumbling medical care.The Marshallese still live with the contamination, illness, displacement, dependency and fear brought on by U.S. nuclear tests in the 1940s and 1950s - 67 blasts with a total power 7,000 times that unleashed on Hiroshima, Japan, in wartime.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | October 26, 1997
For more than a year now, doctors at the University of Maryland at Baltimore have been working to help the Marshall Islands devise a health care system better than the wreck left behind after 40 years of U.S. trusteeship over the islands."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | October 26, 1997
MAJURO, Republic of the Marshall Islands -- Nature blessed the Marshall Islands with warm Pacific breezes, tropical fruits, schooling fish and turquoise lagoons.But a half-century of U.S. control and influence here since World War II has cursed them with illness and crumbling medical care.The Marshallese still live with the contamination, illness, displacement, dependency and fear brought on by U.S. nuclear tests in the 1940s and 1950s - 67 blasts with a total power 7,000 times that unleashed on Hiroshima, Japan, in wartime.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
MAJURO, Republic of the Marshall Islands -- Dr. Jack Shannon, the last U.S. Public Health Service dentist in the Marshall Islands, would like to be brightening smiles all over the land.Instead, the wiry, crew-cut former missionary, who heads the only dental practice in this former U.S. Trust Territory, spends most of his time in a cramped hospital clinic here pulling rotten teeth."I've seen 6-year-olds with 18 decayed teeth," he says. "The most [teeth] they can have is 24."An increasingly Western diet heavy with highly refined food and sugar arrived with the Americans after World War II, and now it is turning Marshallese teeth to mush.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2003
MAJURO, Marshall Islands -- A half-dozen people, birth mothers and baby sitters, sat on couches or on the floor in a modern house, holding gurgling newborns destined for adoption by American couples. Some of the infants already had been matched with American parents. Among them was Rosita Lamgrin, 21, who had just given birth to her fifth child, the first she'd decided to give up for adoption. In a nearby bedroom, another mother was changing a diaper. Cuddling a soon-to-be adopted baby was Lina Morris, operator of the Pacific Children Adoption Agency, who pioneered the Marshall Islands to Hawaii commerce in mothers and their newborns.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
MAJURO, Marshall Islands - She sits on the grass on a warm, windy afternoon, with the Pacific tide rolling gently on the rock-strewn beach behind her. The placid scene contrasts sharply with the part of her young life she is describing. Five years ago, when she was 12, she and her younger sister were adopted by a Greenwood, S.C., couple. The sexual abuse by her adoptive father began almost as soon as she moved into his home, she said. The Sun does not publish the names of alleged victims of sexual abuse.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 17, 2003
THERE HAD been 21,484 sunrises and sunsets since the day Sam Culotta, a teen-age Navy medic, put the thermometer in little Kunio Joseph's mouth to keep him from crying. All those days had gone by since he last saw the boy in the war-scarred paradise of the Marshall Islands, 7,000 miles from Baltimore. Time and distance did not erase the memories, and curiosity about the boy consumed him, so Culotta, now 78 years old, sat in his law office on Belair Road on Dec. 30, 2002, and dictated a letter to the embassy of the Marshalls in Washington.
NEWS
October 5, 1997
Veteran of invasion recalls MajuroSun staff reporter Frank D. Roylance made my day with his ''Sun Journal'' report and photograph on the current status of Majuro atoll in the Marshall Islands of the Pacific (Sept. 14). However, Mr. Roylance omits any reference to what occurred there during World War II.On Jan. 31, 1944, as a member of a naval assault beach party, together with the 105th Battalion of the Army's 27th Division, I landed on Majuro.This was the best invasion of the nine in which I participated.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
MAJURO, Republic of the Marshall Islands -- There is precious little to this island nation, a family of dots sprinkled onto the Pacific halfway between Hawaii and Australia.No misty volcanic mountains, no rugged seaside cliffs or deep tropical jungles. Only a handful of delicate coral atolls, like jade necklaces, are flung across 2 million square miles of blue ocean.The atolls' slender islands are capped by coconut palms and surrounded by reefs. You can walk across any of them in just a few minutes.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
For Valerie Shefik, the effort to adopt a second Marshallese child led to what she calls one of the most heart-wrenching experiences of her life. Valerie, 44, and her husband, Robert, 46, first adopted a Marshallese child in late 1997 through the TLC Adoption Agency in Washington state. The boy's adoption was approved by the Arizona courts and went smoothly. Nearly three years later, the Scottsdale, Ariz., couple were exploring the possibility of another adoption when Valerie Shefik got a call from TLC around Thanksgiving, telling her that a 7-year-old Marshallese girl "had to be placed quickly."
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Willoughby Mariano and Walter F. Roche Jr. and Willoughby Mariano,SUN STAFF AND ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 17, 2002
SPRINGDALE, Ark. - For nearly two decades, John Moody made his living killing, gutting and packing poultry on the line at Tyson Foods, the nation's largest meat producer and processor. It was unpleasant work - smelly, repetitive and dangerous. He severed the tip of his index finger on a factory saw. Moody was paid $3.25 an hour when he started there in the early 1980s, and made $7.99 when he left in 1995. But for someone who grew up in the poverty-ridden Marshall Islands, coming to America and working in even a menial job opened "a door of opportunity," he said.
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