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November 17, 2006
From a purely parochial point of view, yesterday's lopsided election of Rep. Steny H. Hoyer as House majority leader is a great day for Maryland. Fewer than two dozen men have served in that influential post since 1899. Mr. Hoyer is the first from this state, and the potential benefits to Maryland are obvious. But it's also a welcome development from a national perspective. The new leader is an effective and accomplished legislator who has built a loyal following in his party. His ascendancy gives hope that the next Congress won't get mired in legislative gridlock and may actually accomplish something over the next two years.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 22, 2014
Item: Washington is abuzz with the shocking defeat of House majority Leader Eric Cantor in a Republican primary. David Brat, a tea party-inspired college professor with little money but plenty of energy, pulled off the historic upset. Most of the mainstream media coverage focused on Mr. Cantor's support (albeit tepid) for a set of immigration reform principles that some on the right interpreted as "amnesty" - and that such support was the primary cause of his loss at the hands of an unknown, underfunded candidate.
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NEWS
May 17, 1996
IF SEN. TRENT LOTT of Mississippi, the early-line favorite, succeeds Sen. Bob Dole as majority leader of the Republican-controlled Senate, "confrontational conservatism" will reign supreme on Capitol Hill. Mr. Lott is an old buddy and soul mate of House Speaker Newt Gingrich and, even more, of House majority leader Dick Armey. He is neither in his relationship with his party's presidential nominee, long an advocate of "commonsense conservatism." There's a big difference.Mr. Dole opposed his likely successor when Mr. Lott won the party whip's job two years ago. And the Mississippian returned the favor by backing Sen. Phil Gramm in his losing primary battles with Mr. Dole earlier this year.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
State Sen. James N. Robey says there was no grand ambition, no plan to ascend to where he now sits as majority leader of the Maryland Senate, or to have made the unusual leaps from Howard County police chief to county executive to legislator. Things happened, he said, one thing led to another, people egged on a sometimes reluctant candidate. He's 73 now, and a couple of weeks ago, because it was Maryland Day, he put on a black-white-red-and-gold state flag necktie to go with the white shirt and gray suit and stepped out of his overnight accommodations at the Calvert House on State Circle to begin one of his last days of his last legislative session.
NEWS
April 30, 1996
HARRY TRUMAN'S press secretary, Charlie Ross, noting early in the 1948 campaign how his boss was getting beat up by fellow Democrats, remarked: "You can guard yourself against the wiles of your enemies but not the stupidity of your friends." His words would apply these days to another plain-spoken man of the Midwest, Bob Dole, a choice target of panicky conservatives, most of whom have never wished him well.Their chief advice, which isn't worth much, is that the GOP presidential nominee should give up his post as Senate majority leader for the supposed purpose of focusing on his national campaign.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | December 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - In a potential shake-up to national politics, House Majority Leader Dick Armey is telling congressional colleagues that he doubts he will run for re-election next year, one of the Texas Republican's closest confidants said yesterday. "Armey is considering not filing for re-election for next year's election and serving out his term in Congress in the next session as majority leader," he said. Armey spokesman Gayland Barksdale declined to comment. No announcement of Armey's decision has been scheduled.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2001
For Del. Maggie L. McIntosh, the significance of her new job as majority leader of the House of Delegates is not the impressive title or the largely procedural duties on the floor. It's where she'll be when the House leadership hashes out its position on key issues. "The majority leader is always in the room when decisions get made," the Baltimore Democrat said this week. House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. named McIntosh, 53, to the majority leader post last month when the resignation of Del. Ron Guns to take a job on the Public Service Commission forced a reshuffle of the House leadership.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 22, 2014
Item: Washington is abuzz with the shocking defeat of House majority Leader Eric Cantor in a Republican primary. David Brat, a tea party-inspired college professor with little money but plenty of energy, pulled off the historic upset. Most of the mainstream media coverage focused on Mr. Cantor's support (albeit tepid) for a set of immigration reform principles that some on the right interpreted as "amnesty" - and that such support was the primary cause of his loss at the hands of an unknown, underfunded candidate.
NEWS
November 19, 2006
?I intend to do everything in my power to make Nancy Pelosi the most successful speaker.? Rep. Steny H. Hoyer, incoming House majority leader ?Let the healing begin.? Rep. Nancy Pelosi, incoming speaker of the House, who had urged Democrats to pick Rep. John P. Murtha for majority leader
NEWS
September 10, 2012
For the good of the country and the legislative process, regardless of who wins the presidential race, the following should resign their leadership posts (although there's a slim chance that it will happen, but Washington is simply dead with them in place): House Speaker John Boehner, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Sen. Dick Durbin (the Senate's assistant majority leader), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, and Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl. Earl Watkeys, Phoenix
NEWS
By Amanda Yeager, ayeager@tribune.com | October 29, 2013
When Maryland Senate President Thomas V. "Mike" Miller Jr. took the opportunity to announce that state Sen. Jim Robey would be the next Senate Majority Leader during a speech at an Oct. 23 fundraiser for Del. Guy Guzzone, everyone in the room was the first to know. "Let's just say it was officially announced that night," Robey said Monday, Oct. 28 of the appointment. "There had been some discussion beforehand, but that's the first time I knew for sure. " Robey, 72, will spend his last year in the General Assembly in one of the state Democratic Party's top roles.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Former state Senate Majority Leader Robert Garagiola has joined the Annapolis lobbying firm Alexander & Cleaver and will take on clients in Montgomery County, the firm announced Monday morning. Garagiola, an attorney and prominent Democrat once considered destined for higher political office, announced in June he was retiring from public life to spend more time with his children. That retirement took effect a little more than two weeks ago, and state law bars him from lobbying in Annapolis for a year.  Instead, Garagiola will be leading Alexander & Cleaver's new office in Montgomery County, where he lives and had represented in the senate for 12 years.
NEWS
September 10, 2012
For the good of the country and the legislative process, regardless of who wins the presidential race, the following should resign their leadership posts (although there's a slim chance that it will happen, but Washington is simply dead with them in place): House Speaker John Boehner, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Sen. Dick Durbin (the Senate's assistant majority leader), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, House Minority Whip Steny Hoyer, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, and Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl. Earl Watkeys, Phoenix
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
A key ally of Speaker Michael E. Busch expressed confidence that the votes will be there to pass Gov. Martin O'Malley's gambling expansion bill when it comes to the floor of the House of Delegates Tuesday. "I think we're going to have the votes. I think it's looking very good,"  Majority Leader Kumar Barve, a Montgomery County Democrat, predicted after House Democrats held a caucus behind closed doors. Barve said several large delegations have backed off earlier statements that they would try to extract concessions for their jurisdictions in return for their votes.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Kenneth Halls Masters, an attorney who represented Catonsville and Arbutus in the Maryland General Assembly, where he had been House majority leader, died of cancer Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. He was 68. Born in Washington and raised at Scientists Cliff in Calvert County, he was a 1961 graduate of Charlotte Hall Military Academy. Interested in politics as a teen, he campaigned for longtime Maryland Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein. He earned a bachelor's degree at what is now Towson University, where he was student body president.
NEWS
By Paul West, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2010
It's not dawn yet, but Rep. Steny H. Hoyer is already greeting voters at a park-and-ride lot in Southern Maryland. His seat in the House of Representatives is considered safe in Tuesday's election, but his status as its second-ranking member certainly isn't. If Democrats lose the House, as analysts predict, Hoyer will be out as majority leader. He has been working hard to prevent such an outcome, and to increase his own victory margin as much as possible. He raised money at Washington events and campaigned for Democratic colleagues around the country.
NEWS
September 1, 1995
Republican Bob Dole's big gamble -- running for president while holding on to his post as Senate majority leader -- hits crunch time after Congress returns from its August-Labor Day break. The Kansas senator will hardly be in a celebratory mood. After failing to win Iowa's straw poll vote, a phony exercise with very real atmospheric impact, his ratings fell from 51.7 percent to 36 percent in a more authentic public opinion sampling in Iowa.Whatever its final effect on his presidential bid, Mr. Dole's position as Senate majority leader will place him in the center of a stormy showdown between the Clinton administration and the Republican-controlled Congress.
NEWS
By JANET HOOK and JANET HOOK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Tom DeLay's decision to stop battling for his former House leadership job helps remove a huge distraction from Republican efforts to recover from a stormy 2005 that put President Bush and the party on the defensive. But DeLay's announcement to throw in the towel might create as many problems as it solves. It has set off a divisive power struggle to succeed him as the House's permanent majority leader - and could spark the overthrow of other leaders. Also, whoever is chosen to replace DeLay will be thrust into a job that, now more than ever, requires the kind of iron-fisted leadership that was the Texas Republican's trademark.
HEALTH
By Paul West | paul.west@baltsun.com | March 21, 2010
As the No. 2 member of the House, Steny H. Hoyer of Maryland has a lot riding on the outcome of today's health care vote. If the measure is defeated, some congressional aides predict privately that Democrats will lose their House majority in the fall elections. Hoyer's job as majority leader would disappear, along with its power and influence. That outcome is significantly less likely after a Sunday press conference in which anti-abortion Democrat Bart Stupak of Michigan expressed his support for the bill.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | December 1, 2007
House Majority Leader Kumar P. Barve, who has supported stricter drunken-driving laws, was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol after being arrested in Gaithersburg late Thursday, police said. Barve, 49, a Montgomery County Democrat, was stopped by a Gaithersburg police officer after his car left a parking lot in oldtown Gaithersburg through a driveway marked "entrance only," police spokesman Sgt. Rudy Wagner said. The delegate did not return calls seeking comment yesterday evening.
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