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NEWS
October 2, 1997
RARE IS the election in which both major parties take comfort in the results, but that is the case in Germany after the Hamburg state elections last month.Party leaders see the portents of victory in next year's national elections: the conservative Christian Democrats gained ground; their main opposition, the leftist Social Democrats, made their worst post-war showing.But to control Germany's parliament, both parties will likely need a majority coalition with a small party, just as the ruling Christian Democrats now have with the Free Democrats.
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EXPLORE
May 3, 2012
I agree with Mr. Kohn (letter, April 12) that one should not have to be registered as a member of a major political party in order to vote in a primary on Circuit Court candidates. However, I did some research and found that the current system of having candidates for this office appear on the primary election of both major parties has been in effect since 1941. That, of course, doesn't mean it can never be changed. I also learned of a Maryland court ruling in 2007 (Suessman vs. Lamone 383 Md. 697)
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NEWS
By Paul West and Ellen Gamerman and Paul West and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 26, 1999
FALLS CHURCH, Va. -- With a withering blast at the two-party system, Patrick J. Buchanan formally abandoned the Republican presidential contest yesterday and joined the fight for the Reform Party nomination.Buchanan starts out as a strong contender for the Reform ticket, which offers the conservative commentator his best opportunity to carry his message of economic nationalism into next year's presidential debate. His third run for the Republican nomination had been stirring little voter excitement and has left his campaign $1.3 million in debt.
NEWS
By Richard J. Cross III | August 3, 2010
This year, Marylanders will have their first opportunity to stand at a voting machine and cast their ballots before Election Day. Approved by voters in 2008 and created by the legislature in 2009, Maryland's early voting program debuts at a time when the marquee showdown between a current and former governor dominates most election coverage. Consequently, many voters may be unaware of this fundamental change to Maryland's voting experience. Here's how it works: Forty-six early voting centers will open across the state shortly before the primary and general elections.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Frank Langfitt and Susan Baer and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 19, 1996
VALLEY FORGE, Pa. -- Ross Perot launched his second bid for the presidency last night, dusting off his familiar charts, homespun homilies and searing attacks on the two major political parties for their failures to address the nation's economic problems."
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2000
Maryland heads into Election Day 2000 a slightly less Democratic state than it was in the last presidential election, but no more Republican and a lot more independent. In a stunning rebuke to the two major parties, more voters have registered as independents over the past four years than have been added by the Republican and Democratic parties combined. The latest figures look especially grim for Republicans, whose efforts to expand the party have run into a brick wall in the past two years.
EXPLORE
May 3, 2012
I agree with Mr. Kohn (letter, April 12) that one should not have to be registered as a member of a major political party in order to vote in a primary on Circuit Court candidates. However, I did some research and found that the current system of having candidates for this office appear on the primary election of both major parties has been in effect since 1941. That, of course, doesn't mean it can never be changed. I also learned of a Maryland court ruling in 2007 (Suessman vs. Lamone 383 Md. 697)
NEWS
August 5, 2003
WITH VOTER participation sagging, the last thing democracy needs is a barrier to new ideas, new parties and new candidates. So the Court of Appeals ruling that makes it easier for challengers to get on the ballot in Maryland is a refreshing reform. Under state law before this ruling, alternative political parties were required to vault two hurdles before their candidates could run under their parties' labels. First they had to collect signatures from 10,000 registered voters to gain state recognition as a party, and then their candidates had to submit a nominating petition with signatures from 1 percent of the voters they hoped to represent, a burdensome and unnecessary two-level qualification.
NEWS
March 21, 2004
What do you think of the process our major parties use to choose their nominees for president? How would you change it? We are looking for 200 words or less; the deadline for responses is Monday. Letters become the property of The Sun, which reserves the right to edit them. By submitting a letter, the author grants The Sun an irrevocable, non-exclusive right and license to use and republish the letter, in whole or in part, in all media and to authorize others to reprint it. Letters should include your name and address, along with a day and evening telephone number.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | March 9, 1993
BERLIN -- Ignatz Bubis, the leader of the Jewish community in Germany, blamed voter frustration with politicians and politics of the major parties for the startling success of the extreme right-wing Republikaners in elections Sunday.The Republikaner Party, campaigning with "the boat is full" anti-foreigner slogans, came from virtually zero four years ago to rack up nearly 10 per cent of the vote in Frankfurt, Mr. Bubis' hometown in the state of Hesse."I don't see any tragedy in this number," Mr. Bubis said.
NEWS
By John F. Kirch | November 20, 2008
While the news media did an effective job this year of covering the presidential campaign between Democrat Barack Obama and Republican John McCain, the press still has a major blind spot when it comes to writing about third-party contenders. According to a basic LexisNexis database search of election coverage from Aug. 5 to Nov. 5, The Washington Post and The New York Times published a combined 3,576 news stories, editorials, op-eds, photographs and letters to the editor about Mr. Obama and 3,205 items about Mr. McCain.
NEWS
By Courtney Pomeroy and Courtney Pomeroy,Sun reporter | August 20, 2008
When the Democratic National Convention begins Monday, voters will have more than bumper stickers and buttons to buy in the name of their party. Food and candy companies have started to realize that they can profit from democracy as well. Burdick Chocolate, based in Walpole, N.H., capitalized on the attention that came to its home in the first primary state with its new line of election chocolates. When Sen. Barack Obama, the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, was campaigning there before the primary election, he stopped by the company's factory for a tour.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- There's one thing I appreciate about what I call the "X-treme" candidates in the presidential debates. When they speak, sometimes a real debate almost breaks out. The X-treme candidates are always out there, dancing on the edges of politics like skateboarders at the X Games, the annual televised "extreme" multisports event that compare to the Olympics the way demolition derbies compare to the Indianapolis 500. There's Rep. Ron Paul, the...
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | October 23, 2006
In many ways, the two leading candidates to fill Benjamin L. Cardin's 3rd District congressional seat couldn't be more different. John P. Sarbanes, the Ivy League son of the well regarded U.S. senator, was literally reared in the milieu of politics from the age of 8, when his father was first elected to Congress. Sarbanes, a Democrat, has raised more than $1 million, winning a competitive eight-way primary that propelled him into November's general election. John White, a self-made businessman, didn't even register to vote until several years ago. He was a Democrat at first but two years later switched to the Republican Party.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,sun reporter | October 9, 2006
It's long after dark outside the Giant Food supermarket at the Dorsey's Search Village Center in Howard County, and Kevin Zeese is in the parking lot looking for votes. He spots three people standing around a car and makes his way over. Tracy Meyers and Mark Davis are visiting Giant worker Laura Riesett on her break. Zeese shakes hands, introduces himself and tells them he is running for the U.S. Senate. "I've been opposed to the war in Iraq from the beginning," he says. "I have a tax plan that will let people keep more of their money.
NEWS
By RALPH NADER | July 9, 2006
In no other Western democracy do third-party or independent candidates confront more obstacles and exclusions from contributing to a competitive democratic process than in the United States. These include both legal obstacles and an abject lack of media coverage. Legal impediments include ballot access barriers, such as requiring huge numbers of verified signatures subject to arbitrary challenges by state officials, as well as a winner-take-all system without the benefit of instant runoff voting or proportional representation.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | May 20, 1992
JERUSALEM -- What Israel needs to become heaven on Earth is a few dozen "coherence generators," contends Ami Rokeah, a former Air Force pilot and current candidate for the Knesset.These are not electrical devices. They are people, like Mr. Rokeah, who practice transcendental meditation, and the installation of meditating ministers in the government is the chief platform of Mr. Rokeah's "Natural Law Party."His is one of dozens of small and seemingly hopeless parties that registered in advance of last night's deadline to file candidacies for the June 23 national elections in Israel.
NEWS
August 20, 1995
If Ross Perot gave credence to an independent run for the presidency by buying his way onto the 1992 ballot, then Bill Bradley gives respectability to the whole idea by reason of his intellect and integrity. The New Jersey senator can't match the Texas billionaire in the art of populist harangue or slick sound bite. He is a free trader with in-depth knowledge of the world economy in contrast to Mr. Perot's jingoistic protectionism.Yet Senator Bradley owes a lot to Mr. Perot's pioneer work in stirring up dissatisfaction with both major parties.
NEWS
By David Nitkin, Andrew A. Green and Ivan Penn and David Nitkin, Andrew A. Green and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
Launching a review of the governor's budget proposal with eyes that may be jaundiced by recent battles, Democrats in the General Assembly say they see signs of retaliation in the $25.9 billion spending plan released this week. Lawmakers are wondering aloud whether Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. is trying to punish them for votes cast during last week's special session by eliminating programs that they favor, withholding money from jurisdictions where leaders live and abolishing patronage long enjoyed by legislators.
NEWS
March 27, 2004
What do you think of the process our major parties use to choose their nominees for president? How would you change it? Collectively, we represent 905 years of experience and wisdom as American-born citizens. And we are dissatisfied with many aspects of the process our major parties use to choose their nominees for president. We suggest the following: The process should be made shorter - don't drag out the campaigning. Instead, use a shorter amount of time and be more productive - prepare and present solid, truthful and concise ideas.
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