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NEWS
February 10, 2012
As a Baltimore native, Orioles spring training season ticket holder and longtime Jeremy Guthrie fan, I'm saddened that my favorite pitcher was traded to the Rockies ("Orioles' spring version of the show: 'As the Rotation Turns,'" Feb. 8). But the recent acquisition of relief pitcher Pat Neshek - the only known vegan player in the Majors - definitely softens the blow. I'll cheer for a vegan pitcher any day - even if he blows more than eight saves. Anyone who spares animals, helps save the environment and promotes healthy living is a champion in my book.
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FEATURES
Chris Kaltenbach, Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Faced with Friday's early afternoon playoff game, school officials and business owners in the Baltimore area are preparing for a day of empty classrooms and vacant work spaces. Sort of. "I don't know how big the number is, but there will definitely be some kids out," predicted Gilman School Headmaster Henry Smyth, himself an Orioles fan with tickets for Friday's game who faced the quandary of what to do. He and his two boys will not be going to the game, Smyth said. But he understands if some parents decide to make baseball the priority.
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NEWS
By Charlie Vascellaro | April 22, 2013
Like most films depicting historic accounts of real-life events, the bio-epic "42" carries the immediate disclaimer that it is based on a true story, leaving room for interpretive analysis and creative license. Consequently, dramatic interpretations are by their nature subject to scrutiny and debate. While the film sticks close to the well-chronicled historic record regarding Jackie Robinson's unique place in time as the first African American to play in the major leagues, its sins are mostly of omission.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Even before they signed it, a handful of Major League Baseball owners expressed deep misgivings about a 2005 agreement negotiated by Orioles owner Peter Angelos establishing conditions under which the Montreal Expos would move and become the Washington Nationals. The owners, all members of baseball's executive council, sounded like customers having second thoughts after buying something from an aggressive salesman. They questioned whether Major League Baseball ceded too much to the Orioles for their agreement to share the club's exclusive television territory, according to the minutes of a March 28, 2005, conference call released last week as an exhibit in a court case.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Major League Baseball will announce Tuesday a new policy to protect players from discrimination and harassment based on sexual-orientation, according to a report from The Associated Press . Per MLB's new guidelines, which strengthen existing policies, the league will develop a workplace code of conduct, create a centralized system for reports of harassment and offer new training sessions to major league and minor league athletes. The league plans to announce its policy during Tuesday's All-Star Game festivities in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
If you run into Walt Wagner, don't be surprised if he tells you right away, that his son — HIS SON!! — is one of two guys Major League Baseball is paying — PAYING!! — to hole up and watch every last inning of every last ball game. His boy, born in Baltimore and raised on the Orioles, beat out 10,000 people for the chance to "eat, sleep and live baseball" for the entire season — albeit behind glass in a Manhattan storefront. "I still get the shakes when I talk about it," gushes Wagner, a retired city cop. "That's my son. " Ryan Wagner, who's 25, is spending the next seven months with fellow winner Mike O'Hara, lazing on a sofa, sipping Budweisers and fixing his attention on what will turn out to be 2,430 games — a head-spinning number of pitches, countless fly balls, who knows how many stolen bases.
BUSINESS
By Chris Korman | December 3, 2012
Alan Rifkin, outside counsel for the Orioles and owner Peter Angelos, said Monday that reports of a possible MASN sale are innacurate. "There has been no contact," he said. "There has been no offer. There has been no discussion of it. MASN is not for sale. " According to John Ourand of the Sports Business Journal, Fox and Comcast have had negotiations with Peter Angelos about acquiring his majority share of the television network and the rights to both Orioles and Nationals games.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The final vote did not come easy, but Major League Baseball chief operating officer Robert D. Manfred finally achieved the necessary super-majority early Thursday night to become the the 10th commissioner of baseball. Manfred, who helped steer the sport through its most volatile labor period and has been a pivotal figure in the game's war on performance-enhancing drugs, was considered the heavy favorite to succeed Allan H. "Bud" Selig when the selection process entered its final stage during the two-day quarterly owners meeting at the Baltimore Hyatt Regency.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers and Phil Rogers,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 12, 2003
Late Orioles game: Last night's game between the Orioles and Chicago Cubs at Camden Yards was delayed by raln in the ninth inning and ended too late to be included in this edition. A complete report can be found in later editions or on the Internet at http://www. sunspot.net. CHICAGO -- Sammy Sosa didn't have much to say after Major League Baseball heard the appeal of his suspension. He added no new information and declined to take questions. Yet Sosa wanted to say one more time that he was sorry --or the Chicago Cubs wanted him to, anyway -- so they trotted him out before the assembled media in Baltimore on Tuesday.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers On baseball | March 1, 2010
Major League Baseball's desire to test players for human growth hormone got a boost Monday from an unlikely source: British rugby player Terry Newton , who became the first athlete suspended after a positive blood test for the performance-enhancing drug. The New York Times reported MLB would rush a blood-testing program into use at the minor league level during the 2010 season. But that appears unlikely according to a highly placed source, who spoke Friday after baseball officials spent the week discussing the legalities and logistics of the situation.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
Orioles slugger Chris Davis, suspended recently for using a banned stimulant, was caught amid a leaguewide crackdown that began three years ago as players' use of Adderall spiked, according to sports physicians and other experts. Amphetamines — a drug with addictive properties — have long been a part of the game's darker side. Even the home run record-setting Hank Aaron acknowledged using the stimulants, once commonly known as "greenies. " The action by Major League Baseball sheds light on growing concern about amphetamines — a type of drug that has become increasingly potent.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
Several U.S. senators have proposed stripping the NFL of its tax-exempt status — a warning analysts say the image-damaged league can't afford to ignore even if the threat proves hollow. Just as it did during Major League Baseball's steroid scandal nearly a decade ago, Congress is using its bully pulpit — and threatening legislation — to prod change on another of the nation's pastimes. Lawmakers introduced bills last week threatening to revoke the league's tax exemption for two different reasons.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The banned amphetamine that will keep Chris Davis off the baseball diamond for 25 games has become a go-to for stressed college students and worn athletes looking for a quick boost of energy. Adderall acts like a "tremendous jolt of caffeine" that some have used to fight through fatigue before a big test or make it through a tough game, said Eric Strain, director at the Johns Hopkins Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and Research. But the drug is not supposed to be used for that and is only approved to treat a few illnesses, including attention-deficit disorder and the sleeping ailment narcolepsy.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
The Orioles haven't yet clinched a playoff spot or figured out their seeding for the postseason, but assuming they are playing in October, their first game will be Oct. 2 on TBS. Major League Baseball announced its postseason schedule today, and the playoffs will kick off -- assuming there are no ties -- with the American League wild-card game Sept. 30, with the National League wild-card game the next day, Oct. 1. If the current standings hold, the Orioles will get the No. 2 seed in the AL and will host the first two Division Series games at Camden Yards on Oct. 2 and Oct. 3. They'd then travel for games three and four (if necessary)
NEWS
August 29, 2014
Ever notice that wan and languid look worn by Major League Baseball players and fans this year? That is not the lingering affects of steroid withdrawal. It is the unmistakable sign that baseball is dying. The lifeblood of wonderment and argument is passing from the game with every challenge and replay. Recently, Adam Jones closed on a ground ball single with the alacrity of a cheetah on the hunt. He picked up the ball and dead aimed it at home plate where the catcher snagged it. The glove was thrust at the runner who had dared to test the arm of the outfielder: Bang, bang, out!
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Orioles principal owner Peter G. Angelos was the first baseball executive to speak publicly about the election of Rob Manfred as Major League Baseball's 10th commissioner Thursday evening at the Hyatt Regency in Baltimore. “Long day, but worthwhile," he said. “I think the owners elected a very confident, strong, strong leader, and I think he's going to make some real difference in the future, and he can build on the accomplishments of the previous administration.” Angelos confirmed that the owners got stuck on 22 of the 23 votes necessary to reach the super-majority necessary to elect Manfred, but ge said that always was going to be the outcome.
NEWS
By Carter Beach | April 16, 2010
This year, millions of people will watch the Orioles at Camden Yards or on TV. We can't know whether the O's will win or lose, but there's at least one thing every baseball fan can be sure of witnessing: spit tobacco use. Baseball has always been a numbers game. Fans everywhere know their favorite players' batting averages and earned run averages. Here in Baltimore, the number 2,632 — Cal Ripken's record for consecutive games played — is etched in many minds. Well, how about these numbers?
SPORTS
September 1, 2011
September 29, 1953: Baltimore was awarded the St. Louis Browns, bringing major-league baseball back to the city.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
The final vote did not come easy, but Major League Baseball chief operating officer Robert D. Manfred finally achieved the necessary super-majority early Thursday night to become the the 10th commissioner of baseball. Manfred, who helped steer the sport through its most volatile labor period and has been a pivotal figure in the game's war on performance-enhancing drugs, was considered the heavy favorite to succeed Allan H. "Bud" Selig when the selection process entered its final stage during the two-day quarterly owners meeting at the Baltimore Hyatt Regency.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Representatives of Major League Baseball's 30 teams were back behind closed doors Thursday morning, first in a full meeting of all the owners and then in smaller discussion groups. They are expected to begin voting to select the next commissioner by early afternoon. The owners filtered into the main meeting room at about 8:30 a.m. and split up less than an hour later. Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos arrived early. MLB chief operating officer Rob Manfred, who is expected to be selected to replace retiring commissioner Bud Selig in January, arrived minutes before the meeting began.
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