Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMajor Label
IN THE NEWS

Major Label

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Randy Lewis and Randy Lewis,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 2004
A long with renters fighting landlords over security deposits and motorists seeking restitution for botched brake jobs, small claims court in Santa Monica, Calif., tomorrow will become an unlikely playing field in the battle over unauthorized distribution of music. Singer-songwriter Sophie B. Hawkins will ask a judge to award her $324, the total three fans paid for three leaked copies of her forthcoming album Wilderness that were sold by an eBay vendor months before the official release date of April 20. "If I win, I'm sending the money to the fans" who bought the unauthorized CDs, Hawkins said Thursday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
In the past two years, Mac Miller, a 20-year-old rapper from Pittsburgh, could have signed a number of deals from major labels. Instead, Miller stayed loyal to his hometown independent label, Rostrum Records. The payoff came in November, when Miller's first album, "Blue Slide Park," debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200, the first independent album to do so in more than 15 years. In Miller's world, a major label simply isn't necessary, not when he can continue to release free mixtapes (such as last month's "Macadelic")
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Lately, things have been heating up for the local rock band Hotspur. Since singer/songwriter Joe Mach and keyboardist Dave Trichter formed the band after graduating from the University of Maryland in 2004, Hotspur has become an independent success story. The five-piece group's second full-length album, "You Should Know Better By Now," was picked up by area Best Buy stores, and the band has drawn several hundred people to shows at Rams Head Live and the 9:30 Club . In July, Hotspur won the NMS Artist on the Verge contest, netting the band about $50,000 worth of merchandise and equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
In order to become truly happy, Canadian country veteran Terri Clark knew she had to leave the one relationship she had worked so hard to build - the one with BNA Records, the Nashville-based label owned by Sony. After spending 14 years on a major label, Clark announced in 2008 that her constant pursuit for a hit record had worn her out, creatively. Grateful for her past success but more than ready to forge on independently, Clark left BNA and finally felt liberated. She said it was no surprise that after her announcement to leave BNA, the subsequent album - 2009's "The Long Way Home," released on her own Baretrack Records - immediately poured out of her. Three years later, Clark says leaving BNA was the best career decision she ever made, no matter how many records she sells.
FEATURES
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 8, 2006
Although he's talking to you on his cell phone as a friend drives him to a guitar shop in New Jersey, Alec Ounsworth assures you that you didn't reach him at a bad time. In fact, this is the only time the busy singer-songwriter-musician can chat with you. Ounsworth is pleasant, relaxed and nonchalant. However, he all but tells you he doesn't care for interviews or talking about making music, something that "just comes" to him. "I don't care to read about myself," he says. "I like to work on music and, beyond that, it's up to everybody else if they like it or not."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | October 30, 2008
He was thinking of a master plan. For Murs, signing with a major label wasn't about "selling out," and he certainly wasn't about to compromise his art too much. The underground West Coast rapper, an acclaimed independent artist for more than a decade, needed a bigger platform for his witty, richly metaphorical messages of perseverance and uplift. Warner Bros. Records certainly had the muscle, and last year the earnest artist signed on the dotted line. On Murs for President, his major-label debut released late last month, the rapper wanted to broaden his musical scope.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 10, 2007
The consensus seems to be that it's a risky move but a brilliant one nonetheless. Radiohead, the multiplatinum British rock band, bucks conventional "record" industry wisdom today by releasing its new album, In Rainbows, exclusively on the group's Web site. But the really audacious part is that Radiohead, which is not under contract with a record company, is allowing fans to pay whatever they want for the music: 1 cent, $1, $10, whatever. Since the critically acclaimed quintet made the announcement a week ago, music circles have been buzzing about the unprecedented move.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
In order to become truly happy, Canadian country veteran Terri Clark knew she had to leave the one relationship she had worked so hard to build - the one with BNA Records, the Nashville-based label owned by Sony. After spending 14 years on a major label, Clark announced in 2008 that her constant pursuit for a hit record had worn her out, creatively. Grateful for her past success but more than ready to forge on independently, Clark left BNA and finally felt liberated. She said it was no surprise that after her announcement to leave BNA, the subsequent album - 2009's "The Long Way Home," released on her own Baretrack Records - immediately poured out of her. Three years later, Clark says leaving BNA was the best career decision she ever made, no matter how many records she sells.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD OLLISON | December 16, 2004
IT HASN'T been easy tracking Maysa down. The plush-voiced jazzy soul stylist has been on the move -- flying to Japan one week or Italy the next, performing two shows a night in packed venues. For the past month or so, she's been on tour with her old band, Incognito, the London-based acid jazz unit masterminded by the great Jean-Paul "Bluey" Maunick. The Pikesville-based artist sings on the group's latest album, the luminous Adventures in Black Sunshine. In addition to that tour, Maysa has several other things popping off. She's the national spokeswoman for the March of Dimes for Premature Births, helping to raise awareness of respiratory syncytial virus or RSV, an infection that mostly affects babies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | December 17, 1993
A lot of bands think that landing a recording contract with a major label is the first step down the road to Easy Street. But to hear bassist Joe Gittleman tell it, when the Mighty Mighty Bosstones linked up with the mighty, mighty Mercury records, it was less a break than a necessary evil."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | November 29, 2011
How did Mac Miller do it? It seems improbable, but the party-all-the-time Jewish rapper from Pittsburgh found himself at the top of the Billboard 200 on Nov. 16, without a radio hit, and more important, without a major-label machine there to take the credit. Miller, 19, sold 144,000 copies of his debut album, "Blue Slide Park," making him the first independent artist to claim the top spot since 1995. He's not a protege of a superstar, nor have any of "Blue Slide Park's" songs charted.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Lately, things have been heating up for the local rock band Hotspur. Since singer/songwriter Joe Mach and keyboardist Dave Trichter formed the band after graduating from the University of Maryland in 2004, Hotspur has become an independent success story. The five-piece group's second full-length album, "You Should Know Better By Now," was picked up by area Best Buy stores, and the band has drawn several hundred people to shows at Rams Head Live and the 9:30 Club . In July, Hotspur won the NMS Artist on the Verge contest, netting the band about $50,000 worth of merchandise and equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,rashod.ollison@baltsun.com | October 30, 2008
He was thinking of a master plan. For Murs, signing with a major label wasn't about "selling out," and he certainly wasn't about to compromise his art too much. The underground West Coast rapper, an acclaimed independent artist for more than a decade, needed a bigger platform for his witty, richly metaphorical messages of perseverance and uplift. Warner Bros. Records certainly had the muscle, and last year the earnest artist signed on the dotted line. On Murs for President, his major-label debut released late last month, the rapper wanted to broaden his musical scope.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | February 7, 2008
As Meg Frampton elaborates on her songwriting process, how much she's inspired by love and literature, her call drops. Her cell phone connection is lost three times as she tries to conduct an interview while en route to a gig in Arizona. Each time Frampton calls back, she giggles, apologizes and picks up exactly where she left off. The 21-year-old guitarist is the songwriting half of the pop-rock duo Meg & Dia. For months, she and her 19-year-old lead vocalist sister and their backing band -- drummer Nick Price, guitarist Carlos Gimenez and bassist Jonathan Snyder -- have been on the road promoting Something Real.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 10, 2007
The consensus seems to be that it's a risky move but a brilliant one nonetheless. Radiohead, the multiplatinum British rock band, bucks conventional "record" industry wisdom today by releasing its new album, In Rainbows, exclusively on the group's Web site. But the really audacious part is that Radiohead, which is not under contract with a record company, is allowing fans to pay whatever they want for the music: 1 cent, $1, $10, whatever. Since the critically acclaimed quintet made the announcement a week ago, music circles have been buzzing about the unprecedented move.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | May 24, 2007
In the past year, less has been more for Judd and Maggie. The brother and sister singer/songwriter team was signed to a major label in 2004 and dropped at the end of last summer. Now, after writing and recording a new EP in their Nashville, Tenn., apartment, the duo is on a two-week tour. They come to the Ottobar on Tuesday. Judd, 27, and Maggie Bolger, 23, started playing music together about five years ago. Though their family is originally from New York, they lived near Catonsville for a while and moved to Frederick during high school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
In the past two years, Mac Miller, a 20-year-old rapper from Pittsburgh, could have signed a number of deals from major labels. Instead, Miller stayed loyal to his hometown independent label, Rostrum Records. The payoff came in November, when Miller's first album, "Blue Slide Park," debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard 200, the first independent album to do so in more than 15 years. In Miller's world, a major label simply isn't necessary, not when he can continue to release free mixtapes (such as last month's "Macadelic")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | October 30, 2003
IT IS PERHAPS one of the best songs from the '80s, a timeless cut. When Simply Red put out "Holding Back the Years" in '86, I assumed the dude was a brotha, of course. I mean, the penetrating vocals and pain-in-my-heart phrasing came straight out of the Otis Redding dictionary of soul. That kind of singing wasn't in vogue at the time. Plastic, synthesizer-crazed pop was all over the airwaves then. And here comes this moody ballad, topping the charts with its reflective lyrics and soul-saturated vocals.
FEATURES
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 8, 2006
Although he's talking to you on his cell phone as a friend drives him to a guitar shop in New Jersey, Alec Ounsworth assures you that you didn't reach him at a bad time. In fact, this is the only time the busy singer-songwriter-musician can chat with you. Ounsworth is pleasant, relaxed and nonchalant. However, he all but tells you he doesn't care for interviews or talking about making music, something that "just comes" to him. "I don't care to read about myself," he says. "I like to work on music and, beyond that, it's up to everybody else if they like it or not."
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD OLLISON | December 16, 2004
IT HASN'T been easy tracking Maysa down. The plush-voiced jazzy soul stylist has been on the move -- flying to Japan one week or Italy the next, performing two shows a night in packed venues. For the past month or so, she's been on tour with her old band, Incognito, the London-based acid jazz unit masterminded by the great Jean-Paul "Bluey" Maunick. The Pikesville-based artist sings on the group's latest album, the luminous Adventures in Black Sunshine. In addition to that tour, Maysa has several other things popping off. She's the national spokeswoman for the March of Dimes for Premature Births, helping to raise awareness of respiratory syncytial virus or RSV, an infection that mostly affects babies.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.