Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaison
IN THE NEWS

Maison

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2004
The name is French and fancy, but the vibe at Notre Maison is down-home and cozy -- fitting because it means "Our House." This teahouse and poetry cafe is situated inside a three-story rowhouse on West 25th Street in Charles Village. Owner Jacqueline Cummings purchased the property (which she dubbed "a rat-infested shell") for $20,000 in April 2002. After months of renovations, Notre Maison opened for business and will celebrate its second anniversary Saturday. What began as a casual tearoom has evolved into a little spot where there's everything from open-mike poetry and live music to book signings by local and national authors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
June 26, 2011
After 37 years, I am back in Paris. It feels as if I had just left about a month ago. The streets come back easily, the language not quite so easily, but easier than I had imagined. The crowds are greater, not just because it is June, but because the world is smaller. More people travel more often. A multi-generational family from Brazil rode on the train with us yesterday from the Gare St. Lazare to Giverny to see Monet's house and garden. The last time I was here, neither house nor garden was open daily to the public.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 2, 2005
BOYS SPORT FOOTBALL Alan Bosworth, Dunbar STATS -- The 6-foot-2, 306-pound senior has been the anchor for the defending Class 1A state champion Poets, who are tied with City and Patterson in their quest for a second straight Baltimore City Division I crown. The All-Metro two-way lineman and team captain plays offensive guard and defensive tackle. SIDELINES -- Although Bosworth, 17, did not play organized football before high school, he is a fourth-year starter. Bosworth also plays the tuba in the Poets' concert and jazz bands, and can be heard each morning on the school's intercom making the daily announcements from the principal's office.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 26, 2008
We're thinking of going to London and Paris from Dec. 21 to Jan. 2. Are there seasonal limitations that would keep us from visiting major sites and attractions? Both cities can be lovely to visit in winter. The cold weather can be bracing when you are spending hours tramping around, and there's certainly no shortage of indoor must-sees in these capitals of art and culture. Plus, there will be holiday lights, trees and events galore. Here are details on what's open and what's closed from Visit Britain and Maison de la France, the official tourism agencies: LONDON Sights: : The London Eye will be closed on Dec. 25 only.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | September 9, 2005
JUSTICE POTTER STEWART uttered his famous statement that he wouldn't attempt to define obscenity, "But I know it when I see it," when the Supreme Court overturned the obscenity conviction of an Ohio cinema that had played Louis Malle's precocious 1958 erotic masterpiece, The Lovers. That movie comes to Washington in a fresh new print this fall when AFI Silver, the National Gallery of Art and La Maison Francaise present Risk and Reinvention: The Cinema of Louis Malle, a near-complete retrospective of the director's groundbreaking, energizing movies.
NEWS
By Mary Moorhead and Mary Moorhead,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 21, 1999
MONTREAL -- As I prepared to visit the Grandparents House of Villeray here during an international conference on aging, I pondered the normal age-group segregation that occurs in our daily lives. As preschoolers, middle-schoolers, teens, adults and seniors, we go about our daily routines mostly interacting with our peers. I wondered, what would it be like if we co-mingled with other generations throughout the day? Would we grow to understand each other? Would our lives be richer?After a morning spent chattering in French with a group of lively volunteers in their 70s and 80s, I was convinced that we all lose in our age-centric lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2005
Paula Poundstone has headlined at the White House Correspondent's Dinner, and on Sunday she'll ham it up at Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis. Expect riffs on politics (she has, after all, covered presidential campaigns -- albeit for The Tonight Show). She also writes about politics for Mother Jones. But her musings often wander into pop culture and regular life. Shows are at 5:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32.45 and are available at www.ramsheadtavern.com. The Rams Head Tavern is at 33 West St. in Annapolis.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 26, 2008
We're thinking of going to London and Paris from Dec. 21 to Jan. 2. Are there seasonal limitations that would keep us from visiting major sites and attractions? Both cities can be lovely to visit in winter. The cold weather can be bracing when you are spending hours tramping around, and there's certainly no shortage of indoor must-sees in these capitals of art and culture. Plus, there will be holiday lights, trees and events galore. Here are details on what's open and what's closed from Visit Britain and Maison de la France, the official tourism agencies: LONDON Sights: : The London Eye will be closed on Dec. 25 only.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 2002
SAN JOSE, Calif. - It has been raining cats and dogs here for two days, and people here are glad. Maybe this means it will finally stop raining pigs. "The hope is that the pigs will head back to the hills," said Lindsey Wolf, who lives in California Maison, a condominium development at the south end of town. "Now that we have rain, people are waiting it out and hoping for the best." For the past few months, the condominiums and nearby neighborhoods have been under siege by marauding wild pigs.
NEWS
By Daamon Speller and Daamon Speller,Special to the Sun | February 4, 2007
On the second floor of a refurbished rowhouse is a small room where the ambience gives off an immediate cool-out vibe. Its color scheme is burgundy and white. Several fans hang from its ceiling. The tables are candlelit, and there is an array of decorative African art throughout. It's 8:30 p.m., and the room is sparsely populated. Twenty minutes later, it's nearly standing room only, with patrons in their 20s to at least their 50s. LaTasha Tayree, the evening's hostess, steps onto the small stage at the head of the room.
NEWS
By Daamon Speller and Daamon Speller,Special to the Sun | February 4, 2007
On the second floor of a refurbished rowhouse is a small room where the ambience gives off an immediate cool-out vibe. Its color scheme is burgundy and white. Several fans hang from its ceiling. The tables are candlelit, and there is an array of decorative African art throughout. It's 8:30 p.m., and the room is sparsely populated. Twenty minutes later, it's nearly standing room only, with patrons in their 20s to at least their 50s. LaTasha Tayree, the evening's hostess, steps onto the small stage at the head of the room.
NEWS
November 2, 2005
BOYS SPORT FOOTBALL Alan Bosworth, Dunbar STATS -- The 6-foot-2, 306-pound senior has been the anchor for the defending Class 1A state champion Poets, who are tied with City and Patterson in their quest for a second straight Baltimore City Division I crown. The All-Metro two-way lineman and team captain plays offensive guard and defensive tackle. SIDELINES -- Although Bosworth, 17, did not play organized football before high school, he is a fourth-year starter. Bosworth also plays the tuba in the Poets' concert and jazz bands, and can be heard each morning on the school's intercom making the daily announcements from the principal's office.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | September 9, 2005
JUSTICE POTTER STEWART uttered his famous statement that he wouldn't attempt to define obscenity, "But I know it when I see it," when the Supreme Court overturned the obscenity conviction of an Ohio cinema that had played Louis Malle's precocious 1958 erotic masterpiece, The Lovers. That movie comes to Washington in a fresh new print this fall when AFI Silver, the National Gallery of Art and La Maison Francaise present Risk and Reinvention: The Cinema of Louis Malle, a near-complete retrospective of the director's groundbreaking, energizing movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2005
Paula Poundstone has headlined at the White House Correspondent's Dinner, and on Sunday she'll ham it up at Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis. Expect riffs on politics (she has, after all, covered presidential campaigns -- albeit for The Tonight Show). She also writes about politics for Mother Jones. But her musings often wander into pop culture and regular life. Shows are at 5:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. Tickets cost $32.45 and are available at www.ramsheadtavern.com. The Rams Head Tavern is at 33 West St. in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2004
The name is French and fancy, but the vibe at Notre Maison is down-home and cozy -- fitting because it means "Our House." This teahouse and poetry cafe is situated inside a three-story rowhouse on West 25th Street in Charles Village. Owner Jacqueline Cummings purchased the property (which she dubbed "a rat-infested shell") for $20,000 in April 2002. After months of renovations, Notre Maison opened for business and will celebrate its second anniversary Saturday. What began as a casual tearoom has evolved into a little spot where there's everything from open-mike poetry and live music to book signings by local and national authors.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 10, 2002
SAN JOSE, Calif. - It has been raining cats and dogs here for two days, and people here are glad. Maybe this means it will finally stop raining pigs. "The hope is that the pigs will head back to the hills," said Lindsey Wolf, who lives in California Maison, a condominium development at the south end of town. "Now that we have rain, people are waiting it out and hoping for the best." For the past few months, the condominiums and nearby neighborhoods have been under siege by marauding wild pigs.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 4, 1993
Maison Marconi, 106 W. Saratoga St. Open for lunch and dinner Tuesdays to Saturdays. MC, V. No-smoking area: no. Wheelchair-accessible: no. Prices: first courses, $1.50-$8; entrees, $5.50-$18.50.As a sort of antidote to all the new upscale chain restaurants I've been to lately, I paid a visit to Baltimore's venerable Maison Marconi. Not that I've had my fill of charred rare tuna and marinated portabello mushrooms, but it was good to step back 15 years, which is about the last time I ate at Marconi's.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | October 18, 1990
Saving the best until last has been a host's tradition since the Wedding Feast at Cana.Maison Marconi, a hallowed downtown restaurant, seems to consider it a tradition worth upholding, at least judging from a recent lunch there.That is not to say that the rest of our meal was not good. Much of it was, but the entrees did not measure up to the sundae made RTC with Marconi's chocolate sauce, another local tradition, or to my dining companion's perfect raspberries served with a healthy splash of cream.
NEWS
By Mary Moorhead and Mary Moorhead,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 21, 1999
MONTREAL -- As I prepared to visit the Grandparents House of Villeray here during an international conference on aging, I pondered the normal age-group segregation that occurs in our daily lives. As preschoolers, middle-schoolers, teens, adults and seniors, we go about our daily routines mostly interacting with our peers. I wondered, what would it be like if we co-mingled with other generations throughout the day? Would we grow to understand each other? Would our lives be richer?After a morning spent chattering in French with a group of lively volunteers in their 70s and 80s, I was convinced that we all lose in our age-centric lives.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach | August 3, 1997
The rue Saint-Guillaume is, at first glance, one of the Left Bank's least-interesting streets. Although located just off the boulevard Saint-Germain in one of Paris' most historic and beautiful neighborhoods, it offers little of the seductive charm and glorious architecture that prevails on the Left Bank.Indeed, an American in Paris -- we shall call her Madame S. -- used to pass by the two-block-long rue Saint-Guillaume in much the way that most tourists do, with complete disinterest.Today, however, she is hurrying with great excitement toward the large green gate guarding the courtyard at 31 rue Saint-Guillaume.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.