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By GREGORY KANE | April 21, 2007
This "stop snitching" mentality is an illness. And it's a contagious one that's spreading. How bad has it become? When the producers of 60 Minutes on CBS feel compelled to do a segment on "stop snitching," then you know it's pretty darned bad. The segment is scheduled to air tomorrow night. Correspondent Anderson Cooper reports the story, and he opens with an alarming, though for Baltimoreans, perhaps not a surprising revelation. "In most communities, a person who sees a murder and helps the police put the killer behind bars is a witness," Cooper begins.
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NEWS
By Steven Stark | March 18, 1992
IT HAS ALREADY become conventional wisdom that the Washington punditry corps may have gone a bit soft on Pat Buchanan because he was one of their own.A similar case of campaign press bias, however, has cropped up virtually undetected. Simply put, a significant number of reporters and pundits have gone South for Bill Clinton.There are other media-watchers who share these views, such as Bill Kovach, curator of the Nieman Foundation at Harvard; Ralph Whitehead, a journalism professor at the University of Massachusetts, and Christopher Lydon, who is assessing campaign coverage for the Columbia Journalism Review.
NEWS
By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub and By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
Make no mistake: Mark Mayfield is no Marian McEvoy. Mayfield, the editor in chief of House Beautiful who replaced McEvoy in July, comes off as a down-to-earth guy who just happens to have really good taste. McEvoy never pretended to be down-to-earth. She partied with the "A" list and made the International Best Dressed List along with Halle Berry, Kate Moss and Queen Rania of Jordan. She came by it naturally -- her journalistic roots were in the fashion-focused world of Elle Decor and W magazine.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 18, 1993
Has success spoiled Lollapalooza?At first glance, the question seems almost ludicrous. How could Lollapalooza (which arrives Tuesday at the Charles Town Races in Charles Town, W. Va.) be a loser when it has already focused mainstream media attention on bands as outre as Babes In Toyland? Who could possibly carp over an enterprise that will bring a variety of alternative rock acts to an audience whose numbers are likely to exceed 1 million nationwide?Start with some of the musicians on the tour, like Fishbone bassist Norwood Fisher, who complained to Rolling Stone that "there should be a little more hip-hop involved in the mix."
FEATURES
By Georgea Kovanis and Georgea Kovanis,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | August 12, 1993
Eric Liu, conscientious twentysomething, was reading a Washington newspaper when he came across yet another story slamming his generation.Loser, it virtually screamed.And that was it. Mr. Liu decided he'd had enough of the stereotypes. He wasn't undirected or misguided or devoid of any sense of fun. He wasn't a slacker, either. "There was no one answering back," he says. "No one from my generation was telling the mainstream press 'This isn't right. It's inaccurate. It's not fair.' "So, on a gamble, he withdrew his post-college life savings -- $2,000 -- and with the help of some writer friends started his own magazine to make things right.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | March 18, 1997
Maybe your boss is driving you crazy. Or it's dawning on you that your husband is acting just like your alcoholic father.Maybe you hear voices, or think about suicide. Or get so scared you can't leave home. Or so depressed you can't get out of bed.You decide the time has come to embark on that quintessentially American solution to life's woes: therapy. The question is, what kind of therapy and with whom?You've heard, of course, of psychoanalysis, and probably of psychodynamic therapy, too, where the idea is to understand your current troubles by tracing them to the emotional patterns laid down long ago in your family.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 20, 2005
DOLGELLAU, Wales - Thank goodness for those history channels that bring back the generals and politicians of the past who, by contrast, make many of today's leaders look indecisive. I saw President Harry Truman on one of them last week. In a speech to the nation near the end of World War II, Mr. Truman rejected suggestions that the Allies seek accommodation with Japan rather than victory. Mr. Truman would have none of it, saying only Japan's "unconditional surrender" would be acceptable.
FEATURES
By Robin D. Givhan and Robin D. Givhan,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 7, 1992
Everyone knows an Alpha -- someone with a unique sensibility and unusual interests. We probably made fun of them in elementary school. Teased them for being oddballs. Now, as adults, they make our lives interesting. But they are still special, still standouts, because once an Alpha, Irma Zandl says, always an Alpha."All of us sort of know that first person who, when CDs came out and they were really expensive, they bought them. And we thought, 'What a waste of money,' " says Ms. Zandl, founder of Xtreme Inc., a New York forecasting company specializing in youth trends.
NEWS
August 1, 2005
Cox will protect public interest as head of SEC "Time for Democrats to take stand against run of corporate crime" (Opinion * Commentary, July 26) questions my former House Homeland Security Committee colleague Rep. Christopher Cox's commitment to corporate accountability. But there's no evidence for its charges. The column cites Mr. Cox's role in 1995 securities litigation reform but fails to note that the bill passed with a strongly bipartisan two-thirds majority in both houses of Congress.
NEWS
June 3, 2006
Forcing foundation to sell just isn't fair Lorraine Mirabella's article "Renewal project stalled in city" (May 29) describes a purported impasse between the Baltimore Development Corp. and one of Baltimore's most prestigious and philanthropic foundations, the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. In 46 years of generous giving to the Baltimore community, first Harry Weinberg and later the trustees of the Weinberg Foundation have given millions of dollars in service to the most poor and most vulnerable among us. The foundation has funded a cancer center building at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and a state-of-the-art emergency department at the University of Maryland's hospital and provided funds for myriad other health-related projects.
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