Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMainstream
IN THE NEWS

Mainstream

NEWS
By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub and By Charlyne Varkonyi Schaub,Special to the Sun | February 9, 2003
Make no mistake: Mark Mayfield is no Marian McEvoy. Mayfield, the editor in chief of House Beautiful who replaced McEvoy in July, comes off as a down-to-earth guy who just happens to have really good taste. McEvoy never pretended to be down-to-earth. She partied with the "A" list and made the International Best Dressed List along with Halle Berry, Kate Moss and Queen Rania of Jordan. She came by it naturally -- her journalistic roots were in the fashion-focused world of Elle Decor and W magazine.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | July 18, 1993
Has success spoiled Lollapalooza?At first glance, the question seems almost ludicrous. How could Lollapalooza (which arrives Tuesday at the Charles Town Races in Charles Town, W. Va.) be a loser when it has already focused mainstream media attention on bands as outre as Babes In Toyland? Who could possibly carp over an enterprise that will bring a variety of alternative rock acts to an audience whose numbers are likely to exceed 1 million nationwide?Start with some of the musicians on the tour, like Fishbone bassist Norwood Fisher, who complained to Rolling Stone that "there should be a little more hip-hop involved in the mix."
NEWS
By OLIVIA ABRAHAM | October 6, 1994
Philadelphia. -- The assumption was, and still is made by many educators, that African-Americans could not acquire standard English-language skills. It was advisable to leave black children alone and let them keep their language.I saw this then, and still see it today as self-serving to the mainstream. Self-serving as an attempt to assuage their guilt for the destruction of the black race in this country, which began with slavery.By others, I see it as an attempt to sabotage the efforts of the black community to succeed in society by encouraging a language that impedes assimilation.
FEATURES
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,BOSTON GLOBE | March 18, 1997
Maybe your boss is driving you crazy. Or it's dawning on you that your husband is acting just like your alcoholic father.Maybe you hear voices, or think about suicide. Or get so scared you can't leave home. Or so depressed you can't get out of bed.You decide the time has come to embark on that quintessentially American solution to life's woes: therapy. The question is, what kind of therapy and with whom?You've heard, of course, of psychoanalysis, and probably of psychodynamic therapy, too, where the idea is to understand your current troubles by tracing them to the emotional patterns laid down long ago in your family.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | July 20, 2005
DOLGELLAU, Wales - Thank goodness for those history channels that bring back the generals and politicians of the past who, by contrast, make many of today's leaders look indecisive. I saw President Harry Truman on one of them last week. In a speech to the nation near the end of World War II, Mr. Truman rejected suggestions that the Allies seek accommodation with Japan rather than victory. Mr. Truman would have none of it, saying only Japan's "unconditional surrender" would be acceptable.
NEWS
August 1, 2005
Cox will protect public interest as head of SEC "Time for Democrats to take stand against run of corporate crime" (Opinion * Commentary, July 26) questions my former House Homeland Security Committee colleague Rep. Christopher Cox's commitment to corporate accountability. But there's no evidence for its charges. The column cites Mr. Cox's role in 1995 securities litigation reform but fails to note that the bill passed with a strongly bipartisan two-thirds majority in both houses of Congress.
NEWS
September 29, 1996
Theft, vandalism ruin Metro experienceWe've all seen the ads on the television, radio and in the newspapers. Take the Metro to Camden Yards, beat the hassle of parking, save money and help the environment. . . .[But] as an Owings Mills subway customer for more than eight years, I have seen an excellent system go downhill when it comes to security on the parking lot. I and others have fallen victim to car thefts, vandalism and robberies within the Owings Mills station parking lots. Car alarms and "The Club" do not deter people if they want your car or what you have in it. These thefts are happening in broad daylight.
FEATURES
By Robin D. Givhan and Robin D. Givhan,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 7, 1992
Everyone knows an Alpha -- someone with a unique sensibility and unusual interests. We probably made fun of them in elementary school. Teased them for being oddballs. Now, as adults, they make our lives interesting. But they are still special, still standouts, because once an Alpha, Irma Zandl says, always an Alpha."All of us sort of know that first person who, when CDs came out and they were really expensive, they bought them. And we thought, 'What a waste of money,' " says Ms. Zandl, founder of Xtreme Inc., a New York forecasting company specializing in youth trends.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff | August 31, 1997
From its post-Super Bowl debut in 1993 to its coming NBC-mandated get-better-ratings-or-die sixth season, "Homicide: Life on the Street" has earned every bit of its reputation as one of television's top dramas.Not that its run has been without problems. Despite its high-profile introduction -- not only did it debut in a time slot guaranteed to produce big ratings, but its executive producer was Oscar-winner (and Baltimore expatriate) Barry Levinson -- the show has never been a ratings smash.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 10, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The latest wrinkle in the latest womanizing (( charges against President Clinton is the disclosure that White House aides are considering forming a legal defense fund for him to which friends and supporters would contribute, possibly anonymously.There was a time when such an acknowledgment probably never would have been made in advance because legal defense funds resurrect memories of the legal scramblings of Watergate, Iran-contra and lesser scandals in which political figures have had to spend small fortunes trying to save their reputations or escape jail.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.