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NEWS
April 3, 2012
I was stunned by The Sun's description of Keith Olbermann's firing from Current TV as, "A mainstream media figure washes out at Current. " You had me for a minute, then I realized the headline appeared onApril Fool's Day. How else to attribute The Sun referring to Mr. Olbermann as a "mainstream media figure?" Joseph L. Holt, Chestertown
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
At first, Baldwin Homes didn't build green. Then it dipped its corporate toe in - one home here, another there. Now the Gambrills company is constructing an entire green neighborhood. It's the story of U.S. home building writ small. Green accounted for 2 percent of the new-home market in 2005, according to a report by industry data provider McGraw Hill Construction. By last year it had ballooned to 23 percent - nearly a quarter. "I don't think green is a niche market anymore," said Michele A. Russo, director of green content at McGraw Hill Construction.
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NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | June 30, 2005
RECENT SHOCKING Supreme Court decisions may at least wake up those people who have been saying glibly that the Senate has been spending too much time fighting over judicial nominees instead of getting back to the "real" issues. What is more real than the Supreme Court's decision throwing homeowners on the mercy of local politicians, who may want to confiscate their homes and turn the property over to some hotel or shopping mall that will pay more taxes? However outrageous it may be to make constitutional protections for property rights vanish by verbal sleight-of-hand, that is unfortunately very much in the mainstream of legal thinking, as the majority opinion in Kelo v. New London demonstrated by citing precedents leading in that direction.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
About 25 years ago, when I was a Republican, there were many responsible Republicans in Maryland whom I admired. This was about the time people with more extreme views were beginning to get involved in the party. They actually thought there was no such thing as separation of church and state in the Constitution. Yet many of the responsible Republicans would say to me: "Don't worry Mel, we only give those people lip service. We need them but they have no chance of directing policy.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | December 1, 1993
Although I'm not certain what the "mainstream" is, I've always thought I was part of it. Family, home, mortgage, job, dog, beer, pizza, Cub games, button-down shirts, stained ties, minivan, Ping golf clubs and a nerdy watch.But now I have serious doubts. Whatever the "mainstream" is, I appear to be outside of it.I realized this the other day when I read a news story in the New York Times.The headline said: "Body Piercing Moves Into the Mainstream."And the story began: "It is easy to pinpoint the moment when body piercing went mainstream.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 11, 2005
Is Janice Rogers Brown, the California Supreme Court justice who was just confirmed by the U.S. Senate to sit on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, more mainstream than the Congressional Black Caucus? I'm sure the caucus wouldn't agree. It's members opposed Brown's nomination from the start. In 2003, Maryland's own Rep. Elijah Cummings, who was then CBC chairman, said that Brown was one of several of President Bush's nominees "who are out of the mainstream of America."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 30, 2005
WASHINGTON - I heard Johnny Carson before I ever saw him. He was an indistinct voice coming out of the living room late at night when I was supposed to be asleep. I'd hear the brass punching its way through the familiar theme, Ed McMahon calling, "Heeeeere's Johnny" and then that wry, puckish voice saying things I couldn't quite hear, stuff that made my mother laugh even as I lay there wondering what wonderful thing I was missing. But Mr. Carson was still there when I got old enough to see for myself.
NEWS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,SUN REPORTER | February 14, 2006
BARDONECCHIA, Italy -- Hannah Teter stood at the top of the hill, reggae music from her iPod piped into her ears, snowboard strapped firmly to her feet. She danced in place, knowing that a gold medal could be waiting at the bottom. That's not all that was down there, though. When her ride was complete, there was much more than the medal, flowers and congratulatory hugs waiting for Teter, a 19-year-old from Belmont, Vt. Snowboarding success now goes hand in hand with big-dollar endorsement deals and unprecedented adoration from a generation of fans who never knew life existed before the snowboard.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
Don't blame the owners of Baltimore's new Whole Foods Market if you enter feeling no chi. Lord knows, they tried. While arranging shelves, dairy cases, butcher and bakery counters, freezers, refrigerators and checkout lanes, the builders of the neighborhood's only supermarket consulted a feng shui practitioner to create just the right balance of positive energy. In deference to her advice, there's a bright-red floor-to-ceiling column standing at the main entrance, a magnet for whatever fugitive chi energy might be adrift around Fleet and South Exeter streets.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | August 31, 2007
In 2001, it was an uphill battle for Sourcefire to find financiers. The new technology company had developed free network security software using open-source methods, meaning, essentially, that it was created and modified by an online community of public volunteers and that anyone could access its source code. Such development went against traditional corporate thinking, which advises that intellectual property be kept close to the vest, protected by patents and accessible only when purchased.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
If one of the hallmarks of true greatness is consistency, NBC Sports is a truly great operation, because again, it came, it covered, it turned in another top-notch Preakness telecast. Covering a horse race for a mainstream audience is not nearly as easy as NBC Sports makes it look. Among the hardest parts is holding the attention of enough general viewers to earn respectable ratings, while talking to the hardcore horse-race aficionados who are your base audience for such events.
HEALTH
By Abigail Green, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Meditation seems to be everywhere lately - on talk shows, in yoga studios, even on our smartphones. A recent Time magazine cover story announced that we're in the midst of "The Mindful Revolution. " Celebrities including hip-hop mogul Russell Simmons and Ellen DeGeneres promote the benefits of meditation, and how-to classes abound. The ancient practice is gaining traction in the mainstream and in medicine. Studies show that regular meditators boast the ability to tune out distractions and even lower blood pressure and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 2, 2014
Chew on these for a minute: "Who are they? Are they these extreme conservatives, who are right-to-life, pro-assault-weapon, anti-gay, is that who they are? Because if that is who they are, and if they are the extreme conservatives, they have no place in the state of New York. Because that is not who New Yorkers are. " - New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, with a directive for New York's GOP candidates last month. "It's not surprising then they get bitter. They cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2014
Last week, former Fox News host Glenn Beck returned for a guest appearance with Megyn Kelly and created a bit of buzz saying he wished he'd have been more positive and less divisive during his days on the cable channel. Some call it an apology. I don't. He left Fox News in 2011 under a cloud of controversy. And I celebrated his leaving, because it meant one of the most divisive, reckless and polarizing figures I had ever covered was being marginalized. I remain convinced that mainstream TV and the country are much better off with him in the margins instead of having an audience of 1.8 million viewers a night as he did on Fox. Here's video of a debate between me and Amy Holmes, one of Beck's employees at TheBlaze, his information and opinion media operation.
NEWS
By Sandy Greenquist | December 16, 2013
Over the past 20 years, conflicting information regarding the use of hormone therapy - and in particular bioidentical hormone therapy, which chemically matches hormones the body already produces - has confused women experiencing perimenopause and menopause. This has prevented many women from getting the treatment they desperately need to alleviate the at times debilitating symptoms that often occur at this phase of life. As a nurse-midwife specializing in menopause over the past two decades, I have been nothing short of shocked at the inaccuracies reported on the topic of hormone therapy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2013
Shane Lauer can be forgiven for wanting to stay in bed. It was a chilly Saturday morning in early November and even veteran marathoners like him don't always feel like training. He did get up, though, and headed to the Northern Central Railroad Trail north of Baltimore to join six other athletes who were preparing for one of several area Turkey Trots, the annual Thanksgiving Day races. Even on this day, Lauer, a soft-spoken 21-year-old from Phoenix, said running makes him feel "good.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein and Ronald Brownstein,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - Republicans opened a potentially significant new front yesterday in their battle with Democrat John Kerry, launching their first broad assault against his views on abortion, gun control, gay marriage, the death penalty and other social issues. Since Kerry effectively clinched his party's presidential nomination in early March, President Bush's campaign and the Republican National Committee have challenged him almost entirely over his record on taxes and national defense. But a study released yesterday by the RNC also targeted the Massachusetts senator on cultural concerns, such as his opposition to banning a procedure some call "partial-birth abortion" and his vote against a measure that allowed states to disregard gay marriages performed outside their borders.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 13, 2005
ST. LOUIS - White supremacist groups around the country are moving aggressively to recruit new members by promoting their violent, racist ideologies on billboards, in radio commercials and in leaflets tossed on suburban driveways. Watching with mounting alarm, civil rights monitors say these tactics stake out a much bolder, more public role for many hate groups, which are trying to shed their image as shadowy extremists and claim more mainstream support. Watchdog groups fear increased violence from these organizations as they grow.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
New solar panels unveiled last week at a real estate developer's Laurel headquarters come with an unusual twist — an energy storage system, the first such commercial setup in the state and one of the first in the country. That drew a crowd. But regular solar-energy projects? Not so much. "You don't see many solar dedications now, and it's for a good reason: It's because solar is becoming more mainstream," said Thomas Leyden, CEO of Philadelphia-based Solar Grid Storage, which worked on the Laurel project.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 28, 2013
Amid the celebration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, one complaint became almost a refrain: What about economic justice? After all, the official title of the event was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. The line "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will be judged not by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character" resides in the rhetorical pantheon with "Four score and seven years ago" and "We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union.
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