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By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 14, 1994
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- People used to take notice of Hans Chien after he opened Caveman Restaurant in Beijing last year; doing business in China was all the rage, and the restaurant was a great topic of conversation when he returned home to Taiwan on vacation.Now, however, many of his friends think he's nuts for wanting to live "over there." Not that business in Beijing is bad -- it's booming -- but Taiwanese have started to look at mainland China a bit differently."All my friends have changed their opinion over the past year," the 33-year-old entrepreneur said.
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NEWS
March 31, 2014
A concerned citizenry is essential for a healthy democracy. While a great deal of attention is focused on the recent protests in Taiwan, it is our responsibility to elaborate the effort of the Republic of China (Taiwan) government to address concerns about the Cross-Strait Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) ("Taiwan head chastises protests on trade deal," March 24). The TiSA was signed in accordance with the ROC principle of "putting Taiwan first for the benefits of the people. " The Legislative Yuan has held a total of 16 public hearings on the TiSA since it was signed in June 2013, and the relevant government authorities have organized over 100 forums to explain the pact to the public.
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FEATURES
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1997
NEW YORK -- The morning's copy of the Ming Pao Daily News is on a shelf in front, and the eight aisles of the Hong Kong Supermarket are packed with shoppers. Up the street -- past the Chinese video stores, some two dozen markets and Mandarin Cultural Enterprises, where they sell pictures of Chairman Mao -- some of the old men are playing a spirited game of mah-jongg in the back room of an old bakery.The signs bear Chinese characters, but no English. The scene could be from a smaller village in south China, or maybe from the heart of lower Manhattan's thick Chinatown.
NEWS
By Ching-Ching Ni and Ching-Ching Ni,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2007
HONG KONG -- Liu Jinling felt like a criminal when she crossed the border from mainland China into Hong Kong. She tried to hide the bulge in her belly by wearing a loose-fitting blouse. She carried a big purse close to her body. The Hong Kong immigration official behind the counter stared at her for a long time, considered her tourist visa, and asked whom she was coming to see. "I knew he was suspicious," Liu said. "When I walked away he turned to look at me again. I was so scared. I thought he must have regretted letting me pass and was going to drag me back."
BUSINESS
By MARK SKERTIC and MARK SKERTIC,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 16, 2006
United Airlines wants to become the first carrier linking Washington, D.C., with direct service to the capital of China. United will ask permission to serve Beijing from the airline's hub at Washington Dulles International Airport. The carrier would be the first offering nonstop service between the two capitals. United said yesterday that details of its plans will be part of an application filed today with the Department of Transportation. Tomorrow is the deadline for carriers to request additional access to mainland China.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 3, 2003
HONG KONG - SARS appears to be spreading in Taiwan as fast or faster than anywhere except mainland China, prompting the World Health Organization to prepare to send a team to the island despite the risk that this could cause diplomatic tensions with Beijing. Taiwan announced yesterday that it had 11 more confirmed cases, bringing the total to 100, a total that has more than tripled in the past 10 days. Five people died of the disease yesterday in Taiwan, raising the island's death toll from the disease to eight.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall and Tyler Marshall,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2004
TAIPEI, Taiwan - Chen Shui-bian began his second four-year presidential term today, using his inaugural address to offer a new beginning in the island's long and troubled relations with mainland China. Speaking at the end of a rain-dampened morning of inaugural festivities, Chen said that despite the divergence of the political systems over the decades, rapprochement between them was possible. "If both sides are willing ... then [the two sides] can seek to establish relations in any form whatsoever," he said.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 30, 1995
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- With his coiffed hair, snazzy clothes and deftly managed call-in show, Lee Tao easily lives up to his unofficial billing as Taiwan's Larry King.For the past month, he has concentrated his show on Taiwan's imminent parliamentary elections, talking to people about the issues, the broken promises and the money politics that every democracy delights in discussing.Saturday's vote, however, is more than a routine election.Instead it marks the start of a four-month period that will transform Taiwanese politics, capping the island's 10-year changeover from dictatorship to full democracy.
NEWS
May 2, 2006
George Yen, a retired engineer who served in the Republic of China's National Assembly for more than four decades, died of pneumonia April 23 at Mercy Medical Center. The Towson resident was 101. Family members said he was born in Imperial China and counted the philosopher Confucius among his ancestors. Mr. Yen graduated from what was then called Peiping University and earned a graduate engineering degree at the University of Ghent in Belgium. A civil engineer, he oversaw transportation in 10 of 35 Chinese provinces before and during World War II. He was a founder and former president of the regional carrier Far East Airlines, according to the family and a friend.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
A concerned citizenry is essential for a healthy democracy. While a great deal of attention is focused on the recent protests in Taiwan, it is our responsibility to elaborate the effort of the Republic of China (Taiwan) government to address concerns about the Cross-Strait Trade in Services Agreement (TiSA) ("Taiwan head chastises protests on trade deal," March 24). The TiSA was signed in accordance with the ROC principle of "putting Taiwan first for the benefits of the people. " The Legislative Yuan has held a total of 16 public hearings on the TiSA since it was signed in June 2013, and the relevant government authorities have organized over 100 forums to explain the pact to the public.
BUSINESS
By MARK SKERTIC and MARK SKERTIC,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 16, 2006
United Airlines wants to become the first carrier linking Washington, D.C., with direct service to the capital of China. United will ask permission to serve Beijing from the airline's hub at Washington Dulles International Airport. The carrier would be the first offering nonstop service between the two capitals. United said yesterday that details of its plans will be part of an application filed today with the Department of Transportation. Tomorrow is the deadline for carriers to request additional access to mainland China.
NEWS
May 2, 2006
George Yen, a retired engineer who served in the Republic of China's National Assembly for more than four decades, died of pneumonia April 23 at Mercy Medical Center. The Towson resident was 101. Family members said he was born in Imperial China and counted the philosopher Confucius among his ancestors. Mr. Yen graduated from what was then called Peiping University and earned a graduate engineering degree at the University of Ghent in Belgium. A civil engineer, he oversaw transportation in 10 of 35 Chinese provinces before and during World War II. He was a founder and former president of the regional carrier Far East Airlines, according to the family and a friend.
NEWS
By PAUL RICHTER and PAUL RICHTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 21, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Chinese President Hu Jintao promised President Bush long-term economic reforms yesterday but offered no immediate concessions on the trade and security issues that threaten the two countries' relationship. Hailed with a 21-gun salute on a sunlit White House lawn, Hu declared that China was committed to overhauling gradually the export-driven economy that has piled up a $202 billion trade surplus with the United States and brought calls in Congress for protectionist retaliation.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2004
LIUZHOU, China - Taiwan and China might be rattling sabers, targeting missiles and threatening war, but Wang Qing-feng isn't letting that stop him from looking for love. After his most recent relationship went sour, the 50-year-old Taiwanese telecom engineer decided to take his quest for a young, good-looking wife across the Taiwan Strait. Arriving in this southern Chinese city, the divorced man with modest biceps and a penchant for muscle shirts found no shortage of candidates. Thanks to a matchmaking service, dozens of women quickly lined up outside his hotel room, waiting for their 15 minutes to chat with Wang and decide whether there's any spark.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall and Tyler Marshall,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 20, 2004
TAIPEI, Taiwan - Chen Shui-bian began his second four-year presidential term today, using his inaugural address to offer a new beginning in the island's long and troubled relations with mainland China. Speaking at the end of a rain-dampened morning of inaugural festivities, Chen said that despite the divergence of the political systems over the decades, rapprochement between them was possible. "If both sides are willing ... then [the two sides] can seek to establish relations in any form whatsoever," he said.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 19, 2004
QUEMOY, Taiwan - If China were ever to carry out its threat to invade Taiwan, it might begin with the occupation of this small island, separated from the mainland by little more than a mile of peaceful blue water. Like the island of Taiwan itself, Quemoy has been fought over for 400 years by a succession of powers as near as the mainland and as remote as the Netherlands. In the past half-century, Quemoy was occupied by Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist troops, the losers in China's civil war, and then barraged by Communist China's artillery and by pro-Communist propaganda (literally, with canisters containing leaflets)
NEWS
May 21, 2003
IF TIMING matters, then the World Health Organization's rejection this week of Taiwan's bid to join it as an "observer" is particularly egregious - and unhealthy for the entire world. In a sense, there's not much new here. This was the seventh straight year that China blocked a move by Taiwan to participate in the United Nations' health agency. China, of course, claims Taiwan as one of its provinces, and as a result the island lost its United Nations seat more than 30 years ago and few nations now recognize it as a state - despite a half-century of separate rule on either side of the Taiwan Strait.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 2003
HONG KONG -- The respiratory disease known as SARS is beginning to kill younger and healthier adults, as medical treatments are proving less effective than originally hoped, health officials here said yesterday. Until the weekend, those who died from severe acute respiratory syndrome had mostly been older than 60, and often were suffering from other health problems. But eight people with the disease died here this weekend, and five of them were between 35 and 52 and did not have medical conditions that might have been contributing factors, said Dr. Liu Shao-haei, a senior manager of the Hong Kong Hospital Authority.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 6, 2003
TAIPEI, Taiwan - President Chen Shui-bian of Taiwan said in an interview here yesterday that he planned a referendum for March calling on China to withdraw ballistic missiles aimed at Taiwan and demanding that China renounce the use of force against the island. Chen's insistence on holding a referendum is likely to heighten tensions across the Taiwan Strait - already at their highest point in several years - and comes at an awkward time for President Bush, who will receive China's prime minister, Wen Jiabao, at the White House next week.
NEWS
May 21, 2003
IF TIMING matters, then the World Health Organization's rejection this week of Taiwan's bid to join it as an "observer" is particularly egregious - and unhealthy for the entire world. In a sense, there's not much new here. This was the seventh straight year that China blocked a move by Taiwan to participate in the United Nations' health agency. China, of course, claims Taiwan as one of its provinces, and as a result the island lost its United Nations seat more than 30 years ago and few nations now recognize it as a state - despite a half-century of separate rule on either side of the Taiwan Strait.
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