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By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 17, 2000
TAIPEI, Taiwan -- When China warned Taiwan this week that Beijing was prepared to "shed blood" to prevent the island from declaring independence, military analysts saw the threat as just talk. The mainland's armed forces aren't capable of launching a successful, large- scale attack on the island, most observers say. And a failed assault would almost certainly spell the end of the unpopular Communist Party. But as Taiwanese go to the polls tomorrow in an election that could significantly worsen cross-strait relations, the present is not the problem.
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NEWS
By Steven Phillips | February 2, 2012
In light of the North Korean nuclear threat, Sino-Japanese territorial disputes and conflicting claims in the South China Sea, Taiwan appears to be the exception in a region of rising tensions. Beijing claims that Taiwan is part of China but has been willing to take a long-term approach in the hope that enhancing cross-Strait ties will bring the island into China peacefully. Taiwanese have shown little interest in provoking the mainland by declaring permanent independence. At the same time, they will not risk their freedom or sovereignty though closer political ties to the mainland.
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NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 14, 1991
HONOLULU -- A year ago, fed up with the high cost of living in Hawaii, investment adviser Robert W. Chamberlain picked up his "Places Rated Almanac" and shopped for a cheaper place to live.He and his wife settled on Sewickley, Pa., a swank community near Pittsburgh where the Chamberlains now happily reside in double the house at half the price and on half the salary."It wasn't so much that we decided to move to Pennsylvania but decided that Hawaii didn't have what we wanted any longer," said the 40-year-old Mr. Chamberlain, one of a growing number of Hawaiians buying one-way tickets to the mainland.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2010
Forecasters predicted a busy hurricane season, and they've been right so far, with 11 named storms and five hurricanes to date. Four reached dangerous Category 4 strength. And the season is only a bit more than half over. So far, however, the U.S. mainland has been spared. Alex and Hermine dragged heavy rain and flooding from Mexico into Texas; and Earl stirred up deadly surf while cruising offshore. But the coastal states have been in a kind of protective bubble, with no direct strikes.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2004
LIUZHOU, China - Taiwan and China might be rattling sabers, targeting missiles and threatening war, but Wang Qing-feng isn't letting that stop him from looking for love. After his most recent relationship went sour, the 50-year-old Taiwanese telecom engineer decided to take his quest for a young, good-looking wife across the Taiwan Strait. Arriving in this southern Chinese city, the divorced man with modest biceps and a penchant for muscle shirts found no shortage of candidates. Thanks to a matchmaking service, dozens of women quickly lined up outside his hotel room, waiting for their 15 minutes to chat with Wang and decide whether there's any spark.
NEWS
September 3, 1995
The opening shots in Taiwan's March 1996 presidential election were missiles fired from mainland China into the sea between Taiwan and Japan. It was an exercise for missiles capable of carrying nuclear warheads, against which Taiwan and Japan have no defense. They are China's President Jiang Zemin's emphatic votes against the re-election of Lee Teng-hui as president of the Republic of China on Taiwan.Mr. Lee's candidacy was adopted by his Nationalist Party and his popularity soars with every sign of Mr. Jiang's hostility.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 16, 1999
BEIJING -- When Hong Kong returned to China 19 months ago in a blaze of fireworks and tearful farewells, many feared that the mainland would trample free speech and human rights in the free-wheeling former British colony.Instead, the territory and its motherland now find themselves on the brink of a constitutional crisis over a matter even dearer to the hearts of Hong Kong's business-minded people: the rule of law.The conflict, the biggest since the July 1997 handover, revolves around a ruling last month by Hong Kong's Court of Final Appeal that would allow tens of thousands of mainland children with Hong Kong parents to live in the territory.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 2006
TAIPEI, Taiwan --Facing an attempt in the Legislature to pass a referendum on recalling the president, the Taiwanese government unexpectedly announced yesterday that it had reached a deal with Beijing to allow many charter flights to and from mainland China. The agreement is the most recent of several signs that relations between Taipei and Beijing might be thawing, a change that has occurred as a political crisis surrounding the president, Chen Shui-bian, has deepened. Chen is known for opposing closer ties to the mainland, which considers Taiwan a breakaway province.
NEWS
October 4, 2002
SINCE CHINA took back Hong Kong from British colonial rule, the forces eroding its residents' liberties have been less like the typhoons regularly blowing in from the South China Sea and more like the insidious pink-hued clouds of pollution that often envelope the territory's islands, thanks to mainland factories. Along with Singapore, Hong Kong still sits atop various worldwide rankings of relative economic freedoms, but under Chinese rule its economy has become ever more linked to the mainland -- and its political system ever more under Beijing's thumb.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 2003
BEIJING - Chinese military officers said yesterday that Taiwan's leadership had pushed the island toward the "abyss of war" with its independence drive, making clear that China would consider a popular vote on Taiwan's political status as cause for war. In lengthy interviews carried prominently by the official New China News Agency and other news outlets, the military officials also said that China would prevent Taiwan from formally declaring independence even...
NEWS
By Steve Phillips | May 23, 2008
While upheaval in Tibet and a devastating earthquake in Sichuan have dominated the headlines over the past month, the greatest danger to East Asian stability and Sino-American relations is another crisis in the Taiwan Strait. The people of Taiwan are ambivalent about cross-strait ties, and some demand independence, despite threats from the People's Republic of China. Washington has called for peaceful resolution of the dispute while pressuring Taiwan's leaders to avoid provocations and demanding that China's leaders eschew violence.
NEWS
By Ching-Ching Ni and Ching-Ching Ni,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 13, 2007
HONG KONG -- Liu Jinling felt like a criminal when she crossed the border from mainland China into Hong Kong. She tried to hide the bulge in her belly by wearing a loose-fitting blouse. She carried a big purse close to her body. The Hong Kong immigration official behind the counter stared at her for a long time, considered her tourist visa, and asked whom she was coming to see. "I knew he was suspicious," Liu said. "When I walked away he turned to look at me again. I was so scared. I thought he must have regretted letting me pass and was going to drag me back."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 13, 2007
CASCO BAY, Maine -- The day-trippers wheel their bikes off the ferry and ask for directions. I answer the way we do on an island without street signs. Go up past the boatyard, beyond the store, and take your next left. They thank me and head off. Then, at the last minute, one turns to offer me a cheerful salute: "Congratulations on your independence." I've been fielding such good wishes from strangers and friends ever since the media outed the small island where my husband and I have had a summer home for more than 25 years.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 2006
TAIPEI, Taiwan --Facing an attempt in the Legislature to pass a referendum on recalling the president, the Taiwanese government unexpectedly announced yesterday that it had reached a deal with Beijing to allow many charter flights to and from mainland China. The agreement is the most recent of several signs that relations between Taipei and Beijing might be thawing, a change that has occurred as a political crisis surrounding the president, Chen Shui-bian, has deepened. Chen is known for opposing closer ties to the mainland, which considers Taiwan a breakaway province.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2005
EWELL -- From her trim front yard in this village on Maryland's Smith Island, Yvonne Harrison, 62, can count a half-dozen "For Sale" signs along the spine of sandy high ground that serves as a one-lane Main Street. Men and women who have spent their lives struggling to earn a living from the Chesapeake Bay have decided it is time to move on. That is not surprising. What is new is the robust market of people who want to buy their homes. Houses in the island's three tiny towns are being scooped up as second homes by mainlanders who can't resist the quiet and isolation -- not to mention prices that seem like bargains to metropolitan-area residents.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
TOMORROW, IN advance of the Lunar New Year, the first nonstop flights between China and Taiwan in 55 years will take to the air, ferrying thousands of island businessmen home for the Chinese world's biggest holiday and back to their more than $100 billion worth of investments on the mainland. The flights -- only for a three-week period and only for Taiwanese working in China -- are a breakthrough in cross-strait relations. Holiday charters flew in 2003 but had to make an intermediate landing in Hong Kong to maintain the island's policy of no direct transportation ties to the mainland.
NEWS
January 28, 2005
TOMORROW, IN advance of the Lunar New Year, the first nonstop flights between China and Taiwan in 55 years will take to the air, ferrying thousands of island businessmen home for the Chinese world's biggest holiday and back to their more than $100 billion worth of investments on the mainland. The flights -- only for a three-week period and only for Taiwanese working in China -- are a breakthrough in cross-strait relations. Holiday charters flew in 2003 but had to make an intermediate landing in Hong Kong to maintain the island's policy of no direct transportation ties to the mainland.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
It came ashore without warning. Driven by a mammoth undersea earthquake, a speeding wall of water rushed inland, decimating everything in its path. The date: Jan. 26, 1700. The place: the west coast of North America. The tsunami devastated a stretch of coastline from California to northern British Columbia, and was so powerful that it wreaked havoc on the other side of the Pacific as well. Scientists say it will almost certainly happen again. The only question is when. "None of us would be too surprised if it occurred tomorrow," said Alan Nelson, a researcher for the U.S. Geological Survey.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2004
LIUZHOU, China - Taiwan and China might be rattling sabers, targeting missiles and threatening war, but Wang Qing-feng isn't letting that stop him from looking for love. After his most recent relationship went sour, the 50-year-old Taiwanese telecom engineer decided to take his quest for a young, good-looking wife across the Taiwan Strait. Arriving in this southern Chinese city, the divorced man with modest biceps and a penchant for muscle shirts found no shortage of candidates. Thanks to a matchmaking service, dozens of women quickly lined up outside his hotel room, waiting for their 15 minutes to chat with Wang and decide whether there's any spark.
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