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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2004
Branch offices of the state Motor Vehicle Administration could not complete some transactions for about an hour yesterday morning because a glitch kept them from connecting with the agency's mainframe computer, officials said. The glitch was the result of a software update over the weekend and was discovered when branch offices opened at 8:30 a.m. yesterday. The problem was fixed and the system was back up by 9:35. MVA offices were shut down for a day in August when the agency's computers crashed because of a computer virus.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 2004
Branch offices of the state Motor Vehicle Administration could not complete some transactions for about an hour yesterday morning because a glitch kept them from connecting with the agency's mainframe computer, officials said. The glitch was the result of a software update over the weekend and was discovered when branch offices opened at 8:30 a.m. yesterday. The problem was fixed and the system was back up by 9:35. MVA offices were shut down for a day in August when the agency's computers crashed because of a computer virus.
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NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | May 11, 1992
The county has postponed, but not given up, plans to merge its computer system with those of the school system and Anne Arundel Community College.Following a free four-week IBM study into the merits of combining the computer system, the county has cited a $850,000 price tag, and no immediate cost savings for the fiscal year beginning July 11, as its reasons for postponing the proposed merger."
BUSINESS
By Mark Ribbing and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1999
In Aztec lore, the number nine is a fearsome symbol of night, death and damnation. In the modern computer industry -- a civilization with its own intricate mythologies -- there has been some speculation about what will happen Thursday, when the nines come out to play. On that day, Sept. 9, the calendar will read 9/9/99. While no one in the high-technology sector is talking, publicly at least, about the prospect of a volcano or horde of demons laying Silicon Valley to waste, some in the trade press have floated the possibility that this once-in-a-century cavalcade of nines could mess up some computer functions.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 14, 1993
Louis V. Gerstner Jr. reshuffled IBM's management yesterday by creating an 11-member executive committee he hopes will enable the various parts of the big computer company to work together more smoothly with less bureaucracy.The move, explained in an IBM memo released yesterday, was a clear signal that Mr. Gerstner believes the company's future lies in making the organization work better rather than in remaking it by overhauling it top to bottom or selling off major businesses.jTC Mr. Gerstner, who became chairman and chief executive in April, is also heavily relying on longtime International Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 1993
International Business Machines Corp. announced yesterday that its first payroll cuts for 1993 would be at three operations in the Hudson Valley of New York state, where up to 3,500 jobs will be eliminated.The company stressed that it would encourage workers at the IBM operations in East Fishkill, Poughkeepsie and Kingston, N.Y., to leave voluntarily, offering incentives of up to a year's salary, medical benefits and retraining. But company officials said the cutbacks might well include layoffs, a historic break with the company's no-layoff policy.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Weber and Jonathan Weber,Los Angeles Times | January 25, 1993
With the benefit of hindsight, it is easy to see the many strategic errors that have transformed International Business Machines Corp. from America's most successful and admired company into a struggling behemoth that has lost $7.8 billion in the past two years.Far more difficult, however, is trying to determine what IBM's chairman, John F. Akers -- or his replacement, if IBM's whopping losses cost him his job -- should do next. The most obvious steps -- to cut tens of thousands of workers and close factories -- have already been taken.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1993
Japanese surplus soars 38%Japan's overall trade surplus soared 38 percent in 1992 to a record $107.1 billion, the government said yesterday.The announcement was almost certain to bring renewed pressure on Tokyo from the United States and Europe to increase imports by allowing easier market access and stimulating domestic demand.Airline investment policy urgedPresident Clinton should halt all foreign investment in U.S. airlines until the new administration forms a policy to govern such deals, the chairman of Delta Air Lines said yesterday.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON | January 25, 1992
Pride goeth before a fall. Americans have heard that forgenerations, with the volume turned up sharply since World War II. Yankee know-how, which once astounded the world, turned into super-patriotic pride, and before long ''Yankee Go Home'' was heard 'round the world.Japan's leaders seem hell-bent to relearn that lesson, cast in slightly different language: One does not tick off one's biggest customer with foolish, gratuitous insults.The most recent irritation arises from remarks of Yoshio Sakurauchi, Japan's speaker of the house.
NEWS
January 3, 1997
COMPUTERS, the technological boon of the late 20th century, could turn into a bane when the clock strikes 12: 01 on Jan. 1, 2000. That's when modern society could come to a crashing halt, thanks to an oversight by pioneers of the computer age.In the formative years, programmers needed to save precious space in computer memories. So they abbreviated years with two digits (96, 97, etc.) in lines of code. But come 2000, that solution turns into a nightmare. Computers will read 00 as the year 1900, or they won't know what how to read the double zeros -- the mechanical equivalent of a nervous breakdown.
FEATURES
By J.D. CONSIDINE and J.D. CONSIDINE,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | July 10, 1997
That the recording industry runs on hype is not news. Obsessed with trends and desperately seeking the Next Big Whatever, its denizens are forever listening for the latest buzz -- something that almost always has to do with fashion, cool or perceived profitability.Musical value, needless to say, usually ends up being the last thing these folks consider. If an album requires close attention and multiple hearings to make its mark, of course it's going to get ignored. Hey, who has time for that sort of thing anymore?
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1997
It's been five years since Albert M. Harris was put to the task of coming up with a solution to what some people thought an unsolvable computer programming problem.The client was Mercantile Safe Deposit & Trust. The Baltimore-based bank was looking for a way to avoid the time, expense and complications of having its mainframe computer system reformatted so the bank could redesign its computer-generated statements for customers. Harris was hired on as a consultant to trouble-shoot.Not only did Harris crack that case by writing a new software program, he found that the program had so many applications for industry that he decided to start a company around it, the Harris Group.
NEWS
January 3, 1997
COMPUTERS, the technological boon of the late 20th century, could turn into a bane when the clock strikes 12: 01 on Jan. 1, 2000. That's when modern society could come to a crashing halt, thanks to an oversight by pioneers of the computer age.In the formative years, programmers needed to save precious space in computer memories. So they abbreviated years with two digits (96, 97, etc.) in lines of code. But come 2000, that solution turns into a nightmare. Computers will read 00 as the year 1900, or they won't know what how to read the double zeros -- the mechanical equivalent of a nervous breakdown.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | October 22, 1996
ARMONK, N.Y. -- International Business Machines Corp.'s third-quarter earnings beat estimates on strong sales of personal computers and mainframes, the computer maker said yesterday.IBM's net income, or operating profit, was $1.28 billion, or $2.45 a share, from $1.3 billion, or $2.30 a share, a year ago. Wall Street expected net of $2.44 a share, based on the average estimate of 15 analysts polled by IBES International Inc.IBM's shares rose to a high of $135.375 after Richard Thoman, the company's chief financial officer, said he expects demand for all the firm's products to hold up well.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 14, 1993
Louis V. Gerstner Jr. reshuffled IBM's management yesterday by creating an 11-member executive committee he hopes will enable the various parts of the big computer company to work together more smoothly with less bureaucracy.The move, explained in an IBM memo released yesterday, was a clear signal that Mr. Gerstner believes the company's future lies in making the organization work better rather than in remaking it by overhauling it top to bottom or selling off major businesses.jTC Mr. Gerstner, who became chairman and chief executive in April, is also heavily relying on longtime International Business Machines Corp.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | April 5, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- It may be the clearest evidence yet of the humbling of Big Blue.As IBM spent the last two months asking more than 100 industry executives to propose a cure for the weakened computer company, the company's board turned to one of IBM's archest rivals: William H. Gates, chairman of Microsoft Corp.Mr. Gates said in a telephone interview last week that he met several times with IBM officials during their search for a replacement for the former chairman, John F. Akers, including a visit by an IBM board member, Thomas Murphy, to Mr. Gates' office at Microsoft's headquarters in Redmond, Wash.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service C | September 12, 1991
IBM took a significant step yesterday toward opening its product line so that it could work more closely with its competitors, announcing seven new mainframes and more than 100 hardware add-ons and software programs.The company also said the powerful water-cooled mainframes it announced a year ago would begin shipping next week. It said these mainframes had top speeds 15 percent faster than IBM had been projecting.Analysts gave International Business Machines Corp. high marks for its new-found openness, which includes a version of the Unix operating system for its mainframe machines and a strategy called the Information Warehouse, which is designed to ease the process of sharing information stored in a variety of formats.
BUSINESS
By John Markoff and John Markoff,New York Times News Service | April 9, 1991
The new president of IBM's mainframe computer division said in an interview yesterday that the company was working to "reincarnate" its most powerful and expensive computers using the same low-cost and speedy technologies that have led to the explosive growth of work stations and personal computers.The company, which introduced a new generation of mainframe computers last September, said that it was redesigning its large systems to take advantage of the growing power of inexpensive chips known as microprocessors.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Weber and Jonathan Weber,Los Angeles Times | January 25, 1993
With the benefit of hindsight, it is easy to see the many strategic errors that have transformed International Business Machines Corp. from America's most successful and admired company into a struggling behemoth that has lost $7.8 billion in the past two years.Far more difficult, however, is trying to determine what IBM's chairman, John F. Akers -- or his replacement, if IBM's whopping losses cost him his job -- should do next. The most obvious steps -- to cut tens of thousands of workers and close factories -- have already been taken.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1993
Japanese surplus soars 38%Japan's overall trade surplus soared 38 percent in 1992 to a record $107.1 billion, the government said yesterday.The announcement was almost certain to bring renewed pressure on Tokyo from the United States and Europe to increase imports by allowing easier market access and stimulating domestic demand.Airline investment policy urgedPresident Clinton should halt all foreign investment in U.S. airlines until the new administration forms a policy to govern such deals, the chairman of Delta Air Lines said yesterday.
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