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By Diane Mullaly | September 4, 1991
50 Years Ago (week of Aug. 31-Sept. 6, 1941):* The Howard CountySurgical Dressing Unit was seeking volunteers this week to help themmeet their wartime quota of 4,700 dressings by Sept. 15. The group met Tuesdays 6 to 10 p.m. and Wednesdays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Workers were requested to wear white dresses or coveralls and white head coverings.* A meeting was held this week at the Ellicott City Court House for the purpose of organizing a Howard County Women's Democratic Club.Representatives from each of the county's election districts were present.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
David L. Reid Jr., a retired postal worker, died Dec. 29 of a heart attack at his Northeast Baltimore home. He was 70. David Lee Reid Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised near Gwynns Falls Parkway. He was a 1961 graduate of City College and attended Howard University. He later served in the Navy. Mr. Reid worked for 43 years as a mail processing clerk at Baltimore's main post office on Fayette Street. He retired in 2011. A lifelong movie buff, Mr. Reid also collected films, family members said.
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NEWS
July 31, 2005
Farm Museum receives telephone system upgrade The Carroll County Farm Museum's telephone system recently was integrated with the county government's system. The museum received new telephones, voice mail and new numbers. The number for the main office is 410-386-3880. Long-distance callers may dial 800-654- 4645. The fax line remains 410-876-8544. When calling the main office, a menu of options and information on events and directions, along with an option for a live attendant, will be given.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
For a disciplined U.S. Naval Academy graduate who helped run nuclear-powered ships, Jason Hardebeck likes to move fast and break things. The 46-year-old entrepreneur, who grew up in Montana and Nevada, came to the East Coast to attend the academy in Annapolis. His career has spanned startups in Boston, Black & Decker in Towson and his own Baltimore-based startup, WhoGlue, which he started at the peak of the dot-com boom over a decade ago. He closed a chapter last fall by selling WhoGlue, an online network for private communities, to Facebook for an undisclosed amount.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | October 20, 1994
First Fidelity Bancorp. of New Jersey has asked regulators for permission to move the main office of its primary bank from New Jersey to Maryland in a legal maneuver that would allow the company to own one bank with branches in three states.Under the plan, submitted as part of First Fidelity's proposed purchase of Baltimore Bancorp, customers of the Bank of Baltimore could do their banking in Philadelphia or Newark, N.J., as easily as in Towson or Dundalk.First Fidelity has its headquarters in Lawrenceville, N.J., but it moved the "main office" of its subsidiary, First Fidelity Bank, to Salem in southern New Jersey earlier this year.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
NationsBank Corp. has received the go-ahead to move its local bank headquarters from Maryland to Virginia, and merge its operations in those two states and Washington, D.C., into one seamless bank, with branches in each jurisdiction.The federal Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) approved NationsBank's two-stage application. The Charlotte, N.C.-based company first wants to move the main office of its subsidiary NationsBank of Maryland from Bethesda to McLean, Va. The second step calls for the merger of that subsidiary with Richmond-based NationsBank of Virginia.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | January 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a break with tradition that signifies her unprecedented involvement in policy matters in the new administration, first lady Hillary Clinton's office will be near the Oval Office in the West Wing of the White House, her press secretary confirmed yesterday.The location of Mrs. Clinton's office in the small wing, which houses only the offices of the president and his most senior officials, makes more formal -- and more public -- the powerful role the first lady will play as a policy-maker and adviser over the next four years.
NEWS
February 17, 1991
Taneytown Bank & Trust Co.'s net income for 1990 was $1,751,781, up $13,962 over 1989, or $4 per share, up from $3.97, the firm's president and chief executive officer said.The return on average assets was 1.31 percent and the return on stockholder equity was 15.43 percent, said Carroll D. Myers. Total bank assets for the year increased 10.63 percent.The bank's primary capital to asset ratio was 9.06 percent. The minimum required by the FDIC is 5.50 percent.Taneytown Bank & Trust has two offices each in Westminster and Taneytown, plus one each inUniontown and Keymar.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | April 25, 1995
The 24,500-square-foot brick building with green trim and tinted windows has just what the Howard County Department of Recreation and Parks needs: lots of space.After many years of tending to business in its Ellicott City headquarters and three branch offices around the county, the 25-year-old department has moved its headquarters and branches to one building at 7120 Oakland Mills Road in the Guilford community of East Columbia."We think we can deliver a better service by having everyone under the same roof," said Gary J. Arthur, the acting director of recreation and parks.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1996
Mount View Middle School was notified by telephone three times Friday morning that 13-year-old Steven Duane Tucker, who died that day after collapsing during recess, was wearing a heart monitor and should avoid physical activity, his mother's fiance said yesterday.Steven, a 6-foot, 189-pound eighth-grader from Ellicott City who loved basketball and dreamed of becoming an NBA star, collapsed about 12: 30 p.m. in the Marriottsville school's gym playing the game he loved so much. About 140 students were in the gym at the time.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN REPORTER | March 11, 2008
The proposed budget that Baltimore schools chief Andres Alonso will present to the Board of Education tonight would cut $110 million from the central office, redistributing $70 million to schools and using $40 million to help close a budget shortfall. More than 300 central office jobs would be eliminated under the proposal, cutting the number of full-time positions at system headquarters from 1,531 to 1,222, according to a draft copy of Alonso's board presentation. Alonso has said that administrators with a background in instruction would have the opportunity to be transferred back to schools as teachers or principals, likely taking a pay cut. While that would avoid the need for large-scale layoffs, it appears that some layoffs of noninstructional personnel would be necessary.
NEWS
July 31, 2005
Farm Museum receives telephone system upgrade The Carroll County Farm Museum's telephone system recently was integrated with the county government's system. The museum received new telephones, voice mail and new numbers. The number for the main office is 410-386-3880. Long-distance callers may dial 800-654- 4645. The fax line remains 410-876-8544. When calling the main office, a menu of options and information on events and directions, along with an option for a live attendant, will be given.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2003
With the school board's blessing, Baltimore County Superintendent Joe A. Hairston quietly rewarded each of his top deputies with raises of at least $11,000 last year, while teachers and principals worked without cost-of-living increases. Hairston, who confirmed the raises in an interview this week, said he was making the salaries of his three assistants more competitive, but union leaders said he chose the wrong time to do so. "Last year, everyone was asked to recognize the county's financial concerns and do without a raise.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
With traffic slowed to a crawl, the masts of television news vans raised skyward out front and music blaring from radio station disc jockeys across the street, it seemed like the opening of a hot dance club or even a Hollywood premiere. But the site of yesterday evening's gala was the 900 block of E. Fayette St. - in and around Baltimore's main post office - and if the affair had to be named, it might have been called The Procrastinators' Ball. It happens just about every April 15 - or, when that date falls on a weekend, the Monday after - with the deadline to file income tax returns.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
Inside the cavernous Baltimore post office downtown, James A. Nemec watched as a stream of letters flew by like Indy cars through a noisy sorting machine. "I feel really confident," said Nemec, who is acting postmaster. "If the mail is inducted into this plant, it is going to be delivered." Neither he nor any other postal employee in Baltimore would have dared been so bold a few years ago. In 1994, Baltimore's mail service was ranked by PricewaterhouseCoopers as the worst in the country.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2000
Howard County police have charged a Glenelg High School teacher with abusing and assaulting one of his students twice almost two years ago, authorities said yesterday. David Leland Stevens, 55, who until November was the head of the school's science department, turned himself in yesterday at the Southern District police station. He was charged with two counts of child abuse and two counts of second-degree assault. After a short hearing at District Court, a commissioner released him on his own recognizance.
NEWS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | March 19, 1991
It's been four years since "Big Sony vs. Little Sony" headlines appeared in local and international papers, highlighting the unseemly controversy between small Baltimore restaurateur Sony Florendo and giant Japanese electronics manufacturer Sony Corp.But to Mrs. Florendo, owner of two Philippine-Asian restaurants and a catering operation bearing her name, the battle she fought in the U.S. District Court just a few blocks from her main office on Park Avenue is still very real.Today, Mrs. Florendo must take the name "Sony" off the signs on her restaurants at Harborplace and Owings Mills, her banquet hall on Belair Road and her main office downtown.
BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1991, Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 29, 1991
You work at home and communicate with the office by computer and telephone. (Or you'd like to.) It's called telecommuting.In the past, those of you who worked at home encountered barriers, and you still do, such as zoning and taxes. Are you conducting business in a residential area? If you have the option of commuting to a conventional business office, can you take the home office deduction on your tax return?Now many of these barriers may be swept away. Why? Credit the environment and the war. At first the connections may seem strained, yet the Environmental Protection Agency has come up with some compelling statistics.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 16, 1999
SINCE HE has only been working at Hess Shoes since the Kennedy administration, nobody knows about Steve "Stoney" Blumberg. The chain collapses, and we dwell on the death of a corporate logo. But those who kept the thing going over the decades become afterthoughts.For 127 years around here, Hess sold shoes to the entire family, and now this will cease. Two weeks ago, the chain's officers announced that their final 11 stores would hold going-out-of-business sales and close their doors.This puts Hess into a lengthening line of local retailers, once flourishing but now gone, whose names evoke not only a product but an era: Hutzler Bros.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | July 21, 1998
After nearly a year's delay, the new Westminster post office opened yesterday, promising shorter lines, quicker service and more than enough parking.Postal employees, spit-polished in pressed shirts and ties, stood at the entrance to the building at 345 Woodward Road in Englar Business Park and greeted customers. Many patrons looked a little wide-eyed and lost as they walked into the $2.7 million facility.That is understandable -- it is not the post office they once knew.For starters, the new building has 64 parking spaces out front.
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