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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 20, 2000
Greetings from a couple of dinosaurs who read your column but don't own a PC. But we really want e-mail so that we can communicate with our children while we travel to places like Mexico. Can you advise us how to acquire an e-mail address and tell us of any difficulty we might expect? For several years now I have been a fan of the PocketMail service, which sounds absolutely perfect for a pair of chipper travelers who don't want to mess up vacation time fiddling with computers. For about $100 you can buy a PocketMail device that looks like one of the clamshell electronic organizers but has a telescoping device on the back that you pull out and press against the earpiece and mouthpiece of a telephone.
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BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | October 26, 2008
Beware of a spam e-mail claiming to be from FBI Director John S. Pistole. The FBI warns that the fraudulent e-mail advises recipients that they are the beneficiary of a large sum of money, which they will be permitted to access once fees are paid and personal banking information is provided. The appearance of the e-mail, which incorporates photographs of FBI officials and the FBI seal, leads a recipient to believe that it is authentic. The typical schemes using the FBI name's are lottery endorsements and inheritance notifications, but they can cover a range of scams, including threats and malicious computer program attachments to bogus online auctions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 15, 2004
We have a lot of America Online e-mail saved on our computer. We want to unload it to a file so that we can access it after we stop subscribing to AOL. Can you suggest a technique or product that will enable us to do that? We use AOL 9.0. After more than a decade of leaving its users unable to transfer their e-mail from its proprietary software, AOL switched gears a couple of months back. America Online now lets its customers read and send AOL e-mail using software like Microsoft Outlook, Outlook Express and Eudora.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1995
The Columbia postal carrier who tossed mail into the woods rather than deliver it during Saturday's scorching heat has been fired after just one day on the job, postal authorities said yesterday.The carrier -- identified only as a 33-year-old female temporary employee -- was hired July 8 and had completed a weeklong orientation."Saturday turned out to be her first and only day delivering the route," said Helen Skillman, communications program specialist for the Baltimore district of the U.S. Postal Service.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 7, 2003
I use Hotmail for all of my e-mail, and a few weeks ago I started having this problem when I downloaded an attachment from an e-mail. It would always download the attachment before, but now Outlook Express 6 comes on and tells me "OE removed access to the following unsafe attachment in your mail." I receive this message for all my attachments. I never use Outlook Express, so I don't know how this happened. Can you tell me how to turn this program off so I can download attachments? One of the great features of Microsoft's Hotmail, a Web-based e-mail service, is that users can configure the seriously businesslike Outlook and Outlook Express programs to handle messages instead of accessing them on the Hotmail .com site.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 21, 2002
My wife received an e-mail from an unknown addressee with an innocent subject line. The first sentence said, "For more info, click here," which she did. Up popped an advertisement for teenage-girl porn. It also imbedded its program "Live Shows" in my system. When we boot the system (I run Windows 98), the first thing on the desktop is its legal disclaimer. An icon is on the desktop, and it's listed in the taskbar. I delete the folder from the C drive, but it reappears at the next bootup.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | April 25, 2002
IF YOU'RE ONE of the millions who use Yahoo! e-mail, you'd better check your messages now, or you could be getting a lot of mail you don't want - and maybe even a few phone calls from telemarketers. The Web's most successful Internet portal has changed both its privacy policy and your "marketing preferences." The latter is Web-speak for your willingness to be subjected to advertising in your in box. Unless you change your profile by June 15, you'll give the Web site permission to send its advertisements not only to your Yahoo!
NEWS
February 8, 2006
If it seems as if we never talk anymore at work, it's because we probably don't. At least for work purposes, according to a query of business executives who say their communications is almost strictly confined to e-mail these days. The telephone is a distant third when it comes to how we communicate at work, with only 13 percent listing it as the method used most often. Five years ago, the phone was used the most by 48 percent of executives. E-mail was the prime means for only 27 percent then.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | March 29, 1999
I often go back over an e-mail to correct spelling or grammar. Sometimes I change a phrase. Not always -- but enough times to drive me crazy -- AOL will step in when I tap the "send" and say, "This has been revised. Do you want to save it as a text file?" I can answer yes or no. I tried no the first dozen times, and AOL cut me off and the e-mail disappeared into space. So I tried yes, and the same thing happened.I guess that this is what you get for taking time to get your e-mail just right in our supercharged world of information overload.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | July 10, 2003
WHEN I LEFT work last night, my business e-mail in-box was empty. When I logged in from home three hours later to start this column, there were eight messages -- six of them spam. My favorite bore the salutation: "`Lose that gut and fat butt." Like I don't get enough of that from my family. For yucks, I checked my AOL mail. In the three days since I'd last logged on, 51 messages had accumulated -- all spam. Surfing over to my Yahoo mail account, I found 49 new messages. All but six were spam, and of those, three were messages I'd sent to myself for backup purposes.
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