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NEWS
August 3, 1994
The Baltimore area postal service was recently ranked seventh worst in a national survey. How's your service and delivery? We'd like to hear your experiences with mail service in Maryland.Call Sundial, The Sun's telephone information service, at (410) 783-1800. In Anne Arundel County, call 268-7736; in Harford County, 836-5028; in Carroll County, 848-0338. Using a Touch-Tone phone, punch in the four-digit code 6215 after you hear the greeting.
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BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
— Members of Maryland's congressional delegation, saying constituents have complained of lengthy mail delays, pressed the U.S. Postal Service on Friday to resume regular delivery — even as the agency reported it was not aware of any significant problems. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski wrote to Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe that her office has received complaints from residents in Pasadena, Windsor Mill and Perry Hall who say they have not received a delivery in more than a week and have faced extraordinarily long lines at post offices.
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NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | December 22, 1994
The U.S. postmaster general told an audience of area business people yesterday that the city has the nation's most improved mail service over the past three months.Marvin Runyon, speaking at a Baltimore Chamber of Commerce breakfast at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, said Baltimore's mail delivery, considered dismal just a few months ago, has improved considerably.For every 100 pieces of mail delivered here, he said, 77 of them were delivered on time.Last year at this time, only 66 pieces of mail out of 100 were delivered on time.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Despite the old adage about the conditions in which U.S. Postal Service mail carriers will work, Thursday's snowstorm has disrupted delivery into this week. USPS said in a press release posted to its website last week that some mail service in the Baltimore area would be temporarily suspended due to lingering patches of snow and ice that presented a hazard for mail carriers. On Wednesday, officials apologized for "any inconvenience" with mail delivery and said service had resumed in all areas.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | October 8, 1994
Although Baltimore's mail delivery got the worst marks in the country in a national survey, local businesses that depend on the mail give the U.S. Postal Service here mixed reviews.Late deliveries and tardy pickups were the most common complaints in an informal survey of local businesses, institutions and nonprofit organizations. A few managers voiced strong criticism, while others said the Postal Service was doing its best at a tough job.Most spoke of minor annoyances -- but in a concession to reality, none operates under the expectation that the letter carrier will deliver overnight.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2000
Inside the cavernous Baltimore post office downtown, James A. Nemec watched as a stream of letters flew by like Indy cars through a noisy sorting machine. "I feel really confident," said Nemec, who is acting postmaster. "If the mail is inducted into this plant, it is going to be delivered." Neither he nor any other postal employee in Baltimore would have dared been so bold a few years ago. In 1994, Baltimore's mail service was ranked by PricewaterhouseCoopers as the worst in the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2011
A restaurant gift card is a great idea. But restaurants make it so hard. I want to know what I'm giving. I want ordering to be easy, flexible and transparent, with the option of ordering online or in person. I want to know exactly what the card or certificate looks like to the recipieents whether I give it to them in person or have it mailed to them. And I want to know the rules of engagement. So, take a minute to look at your restaurant's gift-card program. Think about if from your customers' point of view, and consider adding in a FAQ page like Ruth's Chris has. They even thought to consider that customers might want to know the answer this question: Q: What should I be looking for in the mail?
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Despite the old adage about the conditions in which U.S. Postal Service mail carriers will work, Thursday's snowstorm has disrupted delivery into this week. USPS said in a press release posted to its website last week that some mail service in the Baltimore area would be temporarily suspended due to lingering patches of snow and ice that presented a hazard for mail carriers. On Wednesday, officials apologized for "any inconvenience" with mail delivery and said service had resumed in all areas.
NEWS
July 10, 2001
SENDING a magazine, newspaper or postcard got more expensive July 1. So did mailing a first-class letter weighing more than an ounce. But if you think that's bad, better not look ahead: The Postal Service is heading toward bankruptcy. Delivering 208 billion pieces of mail annually to 134 million addresses is very labor-intensive. More than 80 cents of every Postal Service dollar goes to pay employees. What's left isn't enough to keep pace with rising fuel and other operating expenses. Meanwhile, more people are using e-mail, overnight couriers, faxes and the Internet.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 8, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Postal Service reported yesterday a profit of $1 billion for the first quarter of its fiscal year, 25 percent more than forecast, as the world's largest mail operation deepened its cost-cutting. The post office cut expenses by $500 million in the quarter that ended Nov. 29 as mail volume and revenue lagged behind projections. Revenue fell $300 million short of forecasts. The Postal Service said it might surpass its $360 million profit target for the current quarter as it keeps a lid on costs.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Key senators reached a tentative agreement Tuesday to save a mail processing center considered significant to the Eastern Shore economy but left the fate of more than a dozen post offices in the Baltimore region uncertain as they considered a sweeping bill to overhaul theU.S. Postal Service. The underlying bipartisan legislation, which is poised for a vote in the Senate Wednesday, would allow the cash-strapped mail service to inch closer to ending Saturday delivery after a two-year waiting period and also restructure the way it pays retiree health benefits - potentially saving the agency billions of dollars a year.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Most Americans are just an email, Tweet or Facebook update away from reaching someone else - or the entire world. And the trend is accelerating, as the number of email accounts alone is expected to grow by almost a billion worldwide from last year to 2014. Now, the U.S. Postal Service has practically conceded that it's being left in the digital dust. The Postal Service proposed Monday changing its first-class delivery standard so mail will arrive two to three days after it is shipped, rather than as early as overnight.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2011
A restaurant gift card is a great idea. But restaurants make it so hard. I want to know what I'm giving. I want ordering to be easy, flexible and transparent, with the option of ordering online or in person. I want to know exactly what the card or certificate looks like to the recipieents whether I give it to them in person or have it mailed to them. And I want to know the rules of engagement. So, take a minute to look at your restaurant's gift-card program. Think about if from your customers' point of view, and consider adding in a FAQ page like Ruth's Chris has. They even thought to consider that customers might want to know the answer this question: Q: What should I be looking for in the mail?
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2004
Do you want Gmail? Of course you want Gmail. The new e-mail program from Google has quickly become the most coveted on the Internet. It has 250 times more storage space than other e-mail services. It lets you search all your messages using Google's vaunted search technology. And the design of Gmail - elegant and functional like Google itself - is a thing of beauty. But how do you get Gmail? This is tougher. You could wait until the summer or fall, when Google plans to offer Gmail to the public for free.
BUSINESS
By Chris Gaither and Chris Gaither,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
Privacy advocates are concerned that there's one big flaw with Google Inc.'s free e-mail service: The company plans to read the messages. The Internet search company says it needs to know what's in the e-mail that passes through its system so they can be sprinkled with advertisements that Google thinks are relevant. Revenue from those targeted ads will pay for the Gmail service, which began a test last week, offering up to 500 times as much e-mail storage as competing Web e-mail programs from Yahoo Inc. and Microsoft Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 8, 2003
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Postal Service reported yesterday a profit of $1 billion for the first quarter of its fiscal year, 25 percent more than forecast, as the world's largest mail operation deepened its cost-cutting. The post office cut expenses by $500 million in the quarter that ended Nov. 29 as mail volume and revenue lagged behind projections. Revenue fell $300 million short of forecasts. The Postal Service said it might surpass its $360 million profit target for the current quarter as it keeps a lid on costs.
NEWS
February 16, 1994
"Disgruntled postal workers," we've heard of. But "disgruntled postal customers"? While they're hardly a rare breed, their numbers have multiplied since the recent ice and snow storms that interrupted mail delivery throughout Maryland.On two ice-coated days during the week of Jan. 16, about 50 percent of deliveries statewide were made. Just after last week's ice and snow falls, mail drop-offs were down by 10 percent, says a spokesperson for the Baltimore postal district, which includes 1,900 mail carriers and 1.3 million daily deliveries in most of Maryland.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | July 13, 1997
THE CHECK IS in the mail. Oh, yeah, sure. And Montgomery Ward is going bankrupt! Try another story.Actually, the check from St. Paul's United Methodist Church for its water bill was in the mail. (And giant retailer Monkey Ward announced last week that it is reorganizing in bankruptcy court.)For those who missed the story, New Windsor cut off water service to two of St. Paul's buildings for failure to pay an overdue bill.The surprised church said that it had mailed the check to the municipality -- after an earlier mail problem prevented the church from receiving the bills from the town office.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,BOSTON GLOBE | July 25, 2002
The junk e-mails just keep pouring in, like a tsunami of digital sewage. It's bad news for those of us with weak stomachs, but a blessing for technology entrepreneurs with anti-spam products to sell. Millions of solicitations for scams or smut pollute the Internet, giving anti-spam researchers plenty of material to work with. As a result, their products are getting better at distinguishing legitimate e-mails from porn and scam messages, and you can find spam filters that do a decent job. One is Spamfree.
NEWS
July 10, 2001
SENDING a magazine, newspaper or postcard got more expensive July 1. So did mailing a first-class letter weighing more than an ounce. But if you think that's bad, better not look ahead: The Postal Service is heading toward bankruptcy. Delivering 208 billion pieces of mail annually to 134 million addresses is very labor-intensive. More than 80 cents of every Postal Service dollar goes to pay employees. What's left isn't enough to keep pace with rising fuel and other operating expenses. Meanwhile, more people are using e-mail, overnight couriers, faxes and the Internet.
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