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Mail Fraud

NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Saying he had behaved no differently from most other members of Congress, former Rep. Dan Rostenkowski pleaded guilty to two charges of mail fraud yesterday and agreed to begin serving a 17-month prison sentence in 30 days.Rostenkowski, a Chicago Democrat who will become the most prominent lawmaker ever to go to prison for official corruption, stood dry-eyed, his arms folded across his chest, as Judge Norma H. Johnson of the U.S. District Court in Washington lectured him and imposed the sentence that the former congressman's lawyers had negotiated with federal prosecutors.
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NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
The president of Wye River Inc. says his conviction and one-year sentence for mail fraud won't stop his company from being a competitor in the local seafood seasoning market."
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 21, 1997
SANTA ANA, Calif. -- Although accused of helping to steal human eggs and embryos from women and implant them in others, Dr. Sergio Stone faces mail fraud charges when his trial begins today.That he will not be charged in the alleged conspiracy to misuse the eggs and embryos of couples desperately trying to have children has angered many.But there is a good reason why Stone, along with two other doctors from the now-closed University of California Irvine Center for Reproductive Health, face no criminal charges for reproductive theft.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1999
Five of the seven judges of Maryland's top court excused themselves yesterday as Bruce C. Bereano, the well-connected Annapolis lobbyist, struggled to explain why he should keep his law license.An emotional Bereano represented himself at an unusual Court of Appeals hearing to determine whether he will be disbarred as a result of his 1994 mail fraud conviction. One retired and four lower court judges replaced members of the bench who stepped aside without offering reasons.Chief Judge Robert M. Bell said through a spokesman only that the court members had discussed the case and decided that the five -- himself included -- should not participate.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1998
"Congratulations!" read the letters mailed to hundreds of thousands of prospective students around the country. "You have been selected by the National Scholarship Program."More than 50,000 of the future students said, "Why not?" and sent in a $10 processing fee. The result? More than a half-million dollars found its way into the pockets of an alleged con man.That's the scheme that federal agents say Christopher Nwaigwe engineered from a modest Essex apartment between 1992 and 1996.An indictment filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore charges Nwaigwe with mail fraud in the operation of 10 "scholarship programs" that deluded students into thinking they had won grants worth $2,500 to $7,500.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2010
Legal rulings coming soon from the U.S. Supreme Court could cut to the heart of a federal probe into a powerful Maryland state senator and affect the years-old convictions of top state lobbyists. If the court overturns a federal mail fraud statute often used in public corruption cases, investigations under way in Maryland and across the country could be tossed, and previous convictions could be overturned. Many legal observers who watch the court closely believe that, at the very least, new limits on how the law may be used are forthcoming.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2005
Two years after federal authorities began investigating a former state senator and a Baltimore construction company that received high-profile state jobs, one of the firm's former partners has been charged with mail fraud and tax evasion in U.S. District Court. The charges stem from a broader grand jury investigation of Poole and Kent Co. and its connection to former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell, who once chaired the Senate Finance Committee and resigned his seat in 2002 to become head of the state's Injured Workers Insurance Fund.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2000
Federal prosecutors are asking a judge to sentence Gerard E. Evans, once the highest-paid lobbyist in Annapolis, to five to six years in prison for defrauding some of his clients. The U.S. attorney's office also wants Evans, who was convicted of nine counts of mail fraud, to be ordered to pay nearly $500,000 in fines and restitution. As prosecutors filed papers in U.S. District Court in Baltimore recommending the penalties for Evans, they also announced that they will not retry Del. Tony E. Fulton on charges that he helped in the scheme to defraud Evans' clients.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A Morgan State University professor was sentenced Friday to three years in prison and will pay $105,726 in restitution in connection with a scheme to defraud the National Science Foundation and his students, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Manoj Kumar Jha, 47, of Severn, was convicted in April of wire fraud, mail fraud, falsification of records and theft of government property. Jha fraudulently obtained $200,000 in grants from the National Science Foundation and used it for personal expenses, the U.S. attorney's office said.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1999
In one of his TV infomercials, John Polk looks busy, the kind of busy that goes with being rich.Busy in his office, busy on his jet and busy interviewing successful subscribers to his programs -- "Inside Secrets," "Elite Performer," "Real Estate Money Machine."But it's not Polk's office. It's not Polk's jet. And, federal prosecutors said, the subscribers are not success stories of Polk's Peak Performance Institute in Hagerstown.U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz ruled Thursday that Peak Performance defrauded thousands of people of more than $10 million.
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