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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
A former assistant vice president for M&T Bank in Baltimore has been charged with mail fraud, prosecutors said, after she defrauded a federal export credit agency and an international corporation to pay American Express bills and her taxes. Rosamaria T. Somarriba is accused of taking more than $223,000 between 2006 and 2011, according to a criminal information filed Dec. 19 in federal court for the District of Maryland. Somarriba worked in the bank's international trade finance division, according to the court filing.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A Morgan State University professor was sentenced Friday to three years in prison and will pay $105,726 in restitution in connection with a scheme to defraud the National Science Foundation and his students, according to the U.S. attorney's office. Manoj Kumar Jha, 47, of Severn, was convicted in April of wire fraud, mail fraud, falsification of records and theft of government property. Jha fraudulently obtained $200,000 in grants from the National Science Foundation and used it for personal expenses, the U.S. attorney's office said.
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NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | November 11, 1994
A father and son pleaded guilty yesterday to federal mail fraud charges for operating a Baltimore-based telemarketing scheme that preyed on churches, nursing homes and hospitals across the nation.Howard "Hank" Bloom, 30, and his father Abrian "Abe" Bloom, 55, took in hundreds of thousands of dollars by contacting more than 22,000 companies between 1989 and 1992, U.S. Attorney Lynne A. Battaglia said.The men, who live in Pikesville, made their money by overcharging customers for shipments of cleaning chemicals, light bulbs and other products, or by billing customers for unauthorized shipments, according to the prosecutor.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Authorities say a Montgomery County man defrauded several senior citizens of thousands of dollars using online dating sites. Krist Koranteng, 32, of Burtonsville and Laurel was indicted Thursday by a federal grand jury on charges of conspiracy, mail fraud, wire fraud and money laundering. From 2012 to February, authorities said Koranteng and others convinced the elderly victims that they were romantically interested in them online and through phone and text messages, and persuaded them to send money to them.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | November 23, 1994
Bruce C. Bereano, the Annapolis lobbyist fighting for his livelihood in court, has some reason for hope. A judge said yesterday he was inclined to toss out one of the criminal charges against Mr. Bereano and would consider dismissing the others.In a somewhat unusual move, U.S. District Court Judge William M. Nickerson said he wanted to consider overnight whether the mail fraud trial should continue. He will announce his decision today.Prosecutors in Baltimore have spent six days trying to prove that the lobbyist overcharged lobbying clients in 1990 through a scheme involving illegal campaign contributions.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | March 29, 1995
Two Hyattsville men were arrested late Monday after a special surveillance unit saw two people stealing mail from a residential mailbox in Forest Hill, said Sgt. Edward Hopkins, a sheriff's spokesman.Harford County sheriff's deputies, U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Postal Service authorities, who were part of the surveillance unit, believe that the men are part of a sophisticated nationwide mail and credit card fraud ring, Sergeant Hopkins said.The suspects are being held at the Harford County Detention Center on $250,000 bond each, he said.
NEWS
By BRENT JONES and BRENT JONES,SUN REPORTER | June 16, 2006
A former Western Maryland principal was found guilty in federal court yesterday of stealing more than $18,000 from her school by using false invoices and keeping money from travel reimbursements. Diane L. McFarland, 52, of Frostburg was convicted on four counts of wire and mail fraud by a U.S. District Court jury. McFarland, who was principal of Cash Valley Elementary School in LaVale, never paid back teachers at her school for costs incurred during conference trips as part of the federally funded Success for All program.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 1, 2001
A federal grand jury in Baltimore has handed up a 15-count indictment charging the former head of a Frederick clothing manufacturing company with filing false income tax returns, mail fraud and making false statements when he applied for a $1.6 million loan. Benjamin J. Gilbert, 54, of Germantown is accused of defrauding Hartz and Co. by creating false invoices for $200,000 worth of goods and services that he billed to the company and gave to himself, according to the indictment announced yesterday by the U.S. Attorney's Office.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
Federal agents arrested a 66-year-old Maryland man Tuesday, claiming that his life was a lie. William G. Hillar of Millersville said he is an Army Special Forces retired colonel who's traveled the world fighting terrorism and advising foreign military organizations. He claims to have a bachelor's degree in psychology, a master's in education and a doctorate in health education. And he frequently speaks out against human trafficking, claiming in marketing materials that his only daughter was kidnapped, forced into the sex industry and killed — a story that became the basis, he has said, for the 2008 film "Taken," starring Liam Neeson.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | June 12, 1996
An Annapolis man and his drapery business were indicted yesterday on 14 counts of mail fraud, charged with trying to cheat the U.S. government out of more than $11 million.Jeffrey Paul Goldstein of the 800 block of Coach Way and his company, Commercial Drapery Contractors Inc., of the 1900 block of Moreland Parkway, were charged with mailing fraudulent cost and pricing data to the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), said U.S. Attorney Lynne A. Battaglia.Battaglia said that in February 1991, Goldstein and his company were awarded a series of contracts from the GSA for the sale NTC and installation of blinds, curtains, and window treatments.
NEWS
By Brian Griffiths | February 24, 2014
Tonight Maryland Public Television will their new documentary "Marvin Mandel: A Complicated Life," taking a look at our 56th governor. I received an advanced copy from MPT and watched it over the weekend and can tell you that it is certainly worth waching.   The piece takes a look at Mandel's rise, from a young man who wanted to be a major league ballplayer, through law school and his selection to be a part of Baltimore's Democratic machine, and then his ascension as governor.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
A Baltimore man claiming to be a financial adviser who could produce high returns without high risk pleaded guilty Friday to mail fraud in connection with a scheme that bilked $890,000 from clients, according to federal and state prosecutors. Casey Charles, 33, faces up to 20 years in prison and a $1 million fine, prosecutors said. According to prosecutors, Charles established Infinite Equity Strategies LLC in 2007. Via direct mail and ads in newspapers and on TV, he promoted the company as a financial adviser whose clients had not lost money in the recession.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 5, 2013
A second person charged in connection with a credit card skimming scheme that operated in Harford County pleaded guilty to mail fraud in U.S. District Court in Baltimore Friday. Tri Tran, also known as "Tony," 35, a citizen of Vietnam unlawfully in the country and living in Maryland, skimmed credit card account data and re-encoded onto different credit cards used to buy merchandise at retail stores, according to the statement of facts in his plea agreement that was entered into court Friday.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
A former assistant vice president for M&T Bank in Baltimore has been charged with mail fraud, prosecutors said, after she defrauded a federal export credit agency and an international corporation to pay American Express bills and her taxes. Rosamaria T. Somarriba is accused of taking more than $223,000 between 2006 and 2011, according to a criminal information filed Dec. 19 in federal court for the District of Maryland. Somarriba worked in the bank's international trade finance division, according to the court filing.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
A Reisterstown financial advisor pleaded guilty in federal court in Baltimore on Wednesday to mail fraud in connection with the theft of more than $800,000 from accounts he managed for a child suffering from cerebral palsy and for an elderly client with dementia. Ralph Edward Thomas Jr., 52, a former vice president in a subsidiary of Harbor Bank, used more than $100,000 in stolen money from the child's trust fund to buy a home, the U.S. Attorney's office said. Thomas also obtained three mortgages valued at $205,000 on the home of the child's mother, using her name without her knowledge, authorities said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
He duped FBI agents and small-town cops, students and child advocates, volunteer firefighters and war veterans into thinking he was a retired colonel in Army special operations who had fought terrorists and insurgents from Kabul to Bogota. William G. Hillar packed rooms and pocketed speaking fees in big cities and tiny towns from Maryland to California, spending a dozen years spinning tall tales about the mujahedin, drug lords and his own daughter being kidnapped, sold into sex slavery and killed.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers John W. Frece and Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | December 1, 1994
Bruce C. Bereano, who helped transform the role of lobbyists in Maryland from advocates to campaign rainmakers, was convicted of mail fraud yesterday.A U.S. District Court jury deliberated five hours before finding the flamboyant lobbyist guilty of tricking his clients into paying for more than $16,000 in illegal campaign contributions to Maryland politicians.Subdued but obviously upset, Bereano, 49, the highest paid lobbyist in Annapolis, conceded his disappointment at the verdict -- but not defeat.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Saying he had behaved no differently from most other members of Congress, former Rep. Dan Rostenkowski pleaded guilty to two charges of mail fraud yesterday and agreed to begin serving a 17-month prison sentence in 30 days.Rostenkowski, a Chicago Democrat who will become the most prominent lawmaker ever to go to prison for official corruption, stood dry-eyed, his arms folded across his chest, as Judge Norma H. Johnson of the U.S. District Court in Washington lectured him and imposed the sentence that the former congressman's lawyers had negotiated with federal prosecutors.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
Federal agents arrested a 66-year-old Maryland man Tuesday, claiming that his life was a lie. William G. Hillar of Millersville said he is an Army Special Forces retired colonel who's traveled the world fighting terrorism and advising foreign military organizations. He claims to have a bachelor's degree in psychology, a master's in education and a doctorate in health education. And he frequently speaks out against human trafficking, claiming in marketing materials that his only daughter was kidnapped, forced into the sex industry and killed — a story that became the basis, he has said, for the 2008 film "Taken," starring Liam Neeson.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
Baltimore County Councilman Ken Oliver is seeking to amend an ethics bill that some believe targets a well-known lobbyist and the president of the firefighters union. The current ethics law bars people who have been convicted of certain crimes — bribery, fraud, embezzlement, theft and forgery, among others — from doing business with the county or representing county employees. Oliver's amendment would require the bill to be "prospective," applying only to those convicted of crimes after Sept.
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