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NEWS
August 4, 2011
It is time for the U.S. Postal Service to consider home mail delivery only three days a week. Emails and text messaging have far surpassed the delivery of mail. The bulk of current mail consists of advertisements and requests for a multitude of donations. The cost of fuel and vehicle maintenance alone could save many millions of dollars and pollution would also be reduced. So think "green" and make a change that is positive. Bill Huppert, Perry Hall
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Despite the old adage about the conditions in which U.S. Postal Service mail carriers will work, Thursday's snowstorm has disrupted delivery into this week. USPS said in a press release posted to its website last week that some mail service in the Baltimore area would be temporarily suspended due to lingering patches of snow and ice that presented a hazard for mail carriers. On Wednesday, officials apologized for "any inconvenience" with mail delivery and said service had resumed in all areas.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Despite the old adage about the conditions in which U.S. Postal Service mail carriers will work, Thursday's snowstorm has disrupted delivery into this week. USPS said in a press release posted to its website last week that some mail service in the Baltimore area would be temporarily suspended due to lingering patches of snow and ice that presented a hazard for mail carriers. On Wednesday, officials apologized for "any inconvenience" with mail delivery and said service had resumed in all areas.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
Recent news coverage of the U.S. Postal Service's proposal to end Saturday mail deliveries has focused mainly on the public's reaction to the change ("For mail carriers, Saturday routes roll on - for now," Feb. 10). What has scarcely been mentioned, however, is the elephant in the room: The main reason the Post Office is in trouble is not a decline in first-class mail but two laws passed by Congress. The first was the 1971 Postal Reorganization Act signed by Richard Nixon. This required that the Post Office be run as independent agency that makes a profit from its services.
EXPLORE
By Doug Miller | February 12, 2013
The U.S. Postal Service last week announced it will stop delivering mail on Saturdays in an effort to curtail losses it has seen in recent years. The changes, set to begin Aug. 5, should save the agency $2 billion annually at a time when the Postal Service lost $15.9 billion in the last fiscal year, according to a statement by Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe posted on the agency's website. Congress has stunted attempts to change the delivery process in the past, and this time lawmakers in Washington confronted this decision with opposition as soon as it was announced.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Most Americans are just an email, Tweet or Facebook update away from reaching someone else - or the entire world. And the trend is accelerating, as the number of email accounts alone is expected to grow by almost a billion worldwide from last year to 2014. Now, the U.S. Postal Service has practically conceded that it's being left in the digital dust. The Postal Service proposed Monday changing its first-class delivery standard so mail will arrive two to three days after it is shipped, rather than as early as overnight.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
Although Baltimore's record for on-time mail delivery was the worst in the nation this summer, a Sun mailing test shows there's a 90 percent chance that a letter you drop in the box today will get there tomorrow.All but 10 percent of the 570 letters deposited in mailboxes around the metropolitan area Oct. 18 were delivered the next day. Most of the remainder were delivered on the second day.With the exception of one letter that has yet to be delivered, the rest of the mail arrived within a week.
NEWS
By Seattle Times | March 18, 1995
MOUNTLAKE TERRACE, Wash. -- Either rent a post-office box or move your mailbox to the curb -- we're not coming to your house anymore.That's what Postal Service officials wrote in a letter sent Thursday to Mickie Burk in the latest round of a delivery dispute that has involved her neighbors, the local postmaster and the City Council.At the center of the dispute is a 3-year-old golden retriever-chow mix named Barney.The Lynnwood, Wash., post office cut off mail delivery to Ms. Burk's home Jan. 13 after Barney reportedly charged a letter carrier's truck.
NEWS
By Laurie Ledgard and Laurie Ledgard,States News Service States News Service Staff Writer Eliza Newlin contributed to this story | February 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Postal Service gets the mail out despite rain, snow, heat or gloom of night, but many letters aren't getting to the troops in Operation Desert Storm very efficiently.The Postal Operations Subcommittee of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Affairs heard testimony Wednesday about problems in delivering mail to troops stationed in the Persian Gulf, much of it from members of Congress who are hearing from anxious constituents."Mail service is not a nice-to-have luxury; it is a military necessity," said Rep. Beverly B. Byron, D-6th.
NEWS
By Fredric Rolando | August 10, 2011
Few institutions touch more Americans than the U.S. Postal Service, whose role is spelled out in the Constitution and which delivers to 150 million homes and businesses six days a week. Letter carriers get to know our communities, occasionally saving elderly residents who are ill, finding lost children and stopping crime. We annually conduct the nation's largest single-day food drive, replenishing food pantries in Baltimore and elsewhere. And yet, the misinformation circulating about the Postal Service is startling, such as the notion that in delivering the mail, the USPS has a massive imbalance between revenues and expenses.
EXPLORE
By Doug Miller | February 12, 2013
The U.S. Postal Service last week announced it will stop delivering mail on Saturdays in an effort to curtail losses it has seen in recent years. The changes, set to begin Aug. 5, should save the agency $2 billion annually at a time when the Postal Service lost $15.9 billion in the last fiscal year, according to a statement by Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe posted on the agency's website. Congress has stunted attempts to change the delivery process in the past, and this time lawmakers in Washington confronted this decision with opposition as soon as it was announced.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
Wanda Feagen pulled on her blue United States Postal Service coat and a pair of thick black gloves shortly after 10 a.m. Saturday, blinking against a hard wind and waiting for her mail delivery truck to fill up on gas. "Hoo hoo!" she said of the cold weather. Feagen had just set out from the Gwynn Oak post office after cataloging mail since the start of her day at 7:30 a.m., and was on her way to the rolling residential hills nearby to begin her regular weekend delivery route.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | December 27, 2012
Once as much of a test of a civilian government's effectiveness as collecting the garbage and keeping the peace in the streets, the delivery of packages and letters via a government postal service has undergone tremendous changes since the days when Benjamin Franklin got the unenviable task of being the nation's first postmaster general. In the United States, it became evident nearly a century ago that there was money to be made by delivering packages more quickly and reliably than the U.S. Postal Service.
EXPLORE
By Bob Allen | June 9, 2012
Over the years, Jim Shriver has amassed his own personal archive of his family's illustrious history. Even so, the Union Mills resident, like many long-time Carroll residents, has always been intrigued by one particular historic marker in front of the former U.S. Post OfficeBuilding on Westminster's Main Street. That marker commemorates the creation in April 1899 of the nation's first Rural Free Delivery Route - often called the first "post office on wheels" - and Edwin Shriver, the man who created it, who happens to be Jim Shriver's distant cousin.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2012
Key senators reached a tentative agreement Tuesday to save a mail processing center considered significant to the Eastern Shore economy but left the fate of more than a dozen post offices in the Baltimore region uncertain as they considered a sweeping bill to overhaul theU.S. Postal Service. The underlying bipartisan legislation, which is poised for a vote in the Senate Wednesday, would allow the cash-strapped mail service to inch closer to ending Saturday delivery after a two-year waiting period and also restructure the way it pays retiree health benefits - potentially saving the agency billions of dollars a year.
NEWS
December 6, 2011
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for rain with a high near 63 degrees. The low tonight is expected to be around 51 degrees. More rain is likely during the day tomorrow -- and there could be snow tomorrow night. TRAFFIC Here are today's morning traffic issues . FROM LAST NIGHT... Police crack down on unleashed dogs in Patterson Park : Since two pit bulls attacked a poodle near the park on Nov. 18, city police officers have issued 10 citations for having an unleashed dog in the park, Maj. William Davis, commander of the Southeastern Police District, said at the community meeting last night.
NEWS
By Hugh T. Skelton | October 4, 1994
OVER THE weekend we learned that a new study shows Baltimore to have the worst mail delivery in the country.That comes on the heels of a study released this past summer showing Baltimore with the seventh-worse mail delivery.Neither report surprised me. After months of problems with mail delivery at my home, including damaged mail, items delivered to the wrong address and chronic late delivery, I conducted my own personal mail study from August 1991 to December 1993.With the scrutiny of a fact checker at The New Yorker magazine, I recorded each piece of mail (more than 5,000 pieces)
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | August 31, 1994
Let us once again consider the strange workings of the bureaucratic mind.There are many businesses, big and small, that require prompt mail delivery. Some live or die by it.One such company is Iroquois Industries, on Chicago's South Side, a label printing firm.It advertises in catalogs, promising 24-hour order filling, and most of its business comes through the mail or by fax."We depend on it," says Marvin Gordon, who started the company 40 years ago."If mail is delivered late or it is lost, we lose the order.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
Most Americans are just an email, Tweet or Facebook update away from reaching someone else - or the entire world. And the trend is accelerating, as the number of email accounts alone is expected to grow by almost a billion worldwide from last year to 2014. Now, the U.S. Postal Service has practically conceded that it's being left in the digital dust. The Postal Service proposed Monday changing its first-class delivery standard so mail will arrive two to three days after it is shipped, rather than as early as overnight.
NEWS
By Fredric Rolando | August 10, 2011
Few institutions touch more Americans than the U.S. Postal Service, whose role is spelled out in the Constitution and which delivers to 150 million homes and businesses six days a week. Letter carriers get to know our communities, occasionally saving elderly residents who are ill, finding lost children and stopping crime. We annually conduct the nation's largest single-day food drive, replenishing food pantries in Baltimore and elsewhere. And yet, the misinformation circulating about the Postal Service is startling, such as the notion that in delivering the mail, the USPS has a massive imbalance between revenues and expenses.
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