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By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | February 12, 2010
In her 24 years of delivering mail to hundreds of East Baltimoreans, Earline Bushrod has faced all manner of weather-related challenges. She says the worst mishaps occur when things aren't what they seem. An example? Stepping into 2 feet of snow when you're expecting only a few inches. "It just leaned me over a bit," Bushrod said as she stumbled before regaining her balance during her route. "But I'll continue to do what I do." Bushrod, 54, and the rest of her fellow postal service workers went back to business Thursday while city, state and federal employees had another day off. Baltimore streets were largely clear, but pathways to mail slots at many homes were not, after two 20-inch-plus storms in five days.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | August 19, 2014
There was a time when such a scene exceeded the imagination of a new generation of Orioles fans. On the fourth floor of the B&O Warehouse, Orioles employees stuffed envelopes with playoff ticket order forms and dispatched them to season-ticket holders Tuesday in the hope and anticipation of an Orange-and-Black October. This is not a unique phenomenon. It's going on all over the major leagues, and the same scene played out the past two years in the Warehouse, but there seems to be general agreement that it all feels more real this year.
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NEWS
February 27, 2011
Regarding your article on expanded testing for sexually transmitted diseases ("In-home kits aim to get those at risk to test for STDs," Feb. 22), using the mail to distribute such kits is a good idea. Many young people today are not practicing safe sex, yet parents often don't take their children to get tested because they are embarrassed, don't have time, or don't realize their kids may be infected. Some young people think that if they don't have any symptoms they are not at risk.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
Marylanders have until 9:00 tonight to register to vote in the June 24 primary. That is also the deadline to change party affiliation, update an address or request an alternate polling place. State election officials said voters can register online or go to their local boards, which will be open until 9 p.m. Voters also can mail in a voter registration application, which must be postmarked today. At the election office, voters will be asked to list their driver's license or state identification number, or provide the last four digits of their Social Security Number.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 8, 2010
Mail carriers will attempt to resume deliveries today, according to the U.S. Postal Service. Deliveries were canceled throughout Maryland on Saturday due to the snowy weather, said Postal Service spokewoman Freda Sauter. On Monday, "carriers will make every attempt to deliver as long as there's safe conditions," she said. Residents are asked to clear a path to their mailboxes to ensure it is visible and safe to access. Mail will not be delivered if carriers deem conditions to be unsafe, according to the postal service.
NEWS
December 15, 2011
Ever since Congress stupidly decided to make the U.S. Postal Service a quasi-private entity, the organization has been going steadily downhill. The arrangement has grossly inflated the ranks of upper and mid-level management, people who have nothing to do with the post office's actual mission of delivering the mail. On top of that, some upper management idiots decided to spend millions of dollars on changing the design of the Postal Service's logo and are now engaged in a massive TV advertising campaign to get people to ship more packages by USPS.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | February 10, 2012
Years ago - 2008 to be exact - I wrote about a $336 million settlement that required Visa, MasterCard and Diner's Club to return foreign transaction fees paid by those traveling outside the country or who made overseas purchases online. The trio had been accused of hiding these transaction fees. They didn't admit any wrongdoing. At the time, I encouraged readers affected - those paying the fees from February 1996 to November 2006 - to fill out a claim. The refund was expected to take up to 18 months.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
A former postal worker admitted Friday that she stole mail and the money inside those envelopes at a Linthicum postal facility, victimizing more than 250 people, according to the U.S. attorney's office in Baltimore. Dorothy Jean Gibson, 56, of Windsor Mill, who worked for the U.S. Postal Service for 13 years, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court to theft of mail by a postal employee, officials said. When sentenced Jan. 11, Gibson could receive a maximum sentence of five years in prison plus three years of supervised release, according to the U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | July 18, 1995
A Columbia postal carrier found a ready solution to lugging around her sack of mail during the recent record-breaking heat. She tossed it into the woods.The carrier -- temporarily hired to fill in for vacationing employees -- dumped the mail from more than half her route into a wooded area Saturday near where Columbia carriers often stop to eat lunch, postal inspectors said yesterday.The inspectors say they believe the carrier just didn't want to deliver mail anymore in the 102-degree heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 2, 1998
I started getting X-rated e-mail on AOL out of the clear blue. I can't imagine where they came from, but I need to stop them immediately. My children use this computer and e-mail.You should log on to America Online, type in Control + K for Keyword Search and type in Mail Controls. Many options are available in the windows that follow.You can order all e-mail addressed to your account shut off. Another choice lets you stipulate which e-mail senders' notes will reach you, causing all others to be rejected.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Veteran mailman Jeffrey L. Shipley turned his apartment into a repository of pilfered postage, authorities say, as he took letters, magazines, Netflix videos and even a Mother's Day card from the homes on his route. Shipley, who worked at a Postal Service facility in Catonsville, "failed to deliver, embezzled and stole over 20,000 pieces of mail," according to federal charges filed against him last week. He faces one count each of mail theft and delaying the mail. Neither Shipley nor his attorney could be reached for comment.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
Despite the old adage about the conditions in which U.S. Postal Service mail carriers will work, Thursday's snowstorm has disrupted delivery into this week. USPS said in a press release posted to its website last week that some mail service in the Baltimore area would be temporarily suspended due to lingering patches of snow and ice that presented a hazard for mail carriers. On Wednesday, officials apologized for "any inconvenience" with mail delivery and said service had resumed in all areas.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
On any given day, a teacher's mailbox is usually chock full of messages: leaflets advertising professional development, discount coupons for office supplies, publications from curriculum companies, and book club invitations. But under a contract that teachers are expected to vote on Thursday, they fear that such communication would cease - unless it comes from the Baltimore Teachers Union. City teachers are criticizing an unusual clause included in the proposed contract that appears to give the union the exclusive right to disseminate information via email or through teachers' mailboxes.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
When a rabbi in Northwest Baltimore reported a home break-in, a Baltimore police detective called him back to investigate. But it was Sabbath and by religious custom he was not allowed to answer the phone. He let it go to voice mail. The next day he called the detective. And called. And called. Then he called his city councilwoman, Rochelle "Rikki" Spector, wondering why the detective didn't have voice mail. Spector soon discovered: No detectives had voice mail in her district.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
David L. Reid Jr., a retired postal worker, died Dec. 29 of a heart attack at his Northeast Baltimore home. He was 70. David Lee Reid Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised near Gwynns Falls Parkway. He was a 1961 graduate of City College and attended Howard University. He later served in the Navy. Mr. Reid worked for 43 years as a mail processing clerk at Baltimore's main post office on Fayette Street. He retired in 2011. A lifelong movie buff, Mr. Reid also collected films, family members said.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun   | December 23, 2013
Under Armour may not want to talk about "Duck Dynasty," but fans of the now controversial reality show took to the Baltimore-based company's social media accounts this weekend to praise Under Armour for sticking by the embattled franchise. Other than a brief statement condeming star Phil Robertson's comments, representatives from Under Armour have not responded to multiple requests for comment.  Interviewed in GQ magazine, Robertson called homosexuality a sin and said African Americans were "happy" in the pre-civil-rights era south.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Sun Staff Writer | July 11, 1994
One ugly comment.That's all it takes for Joe Collins to leave a neighborhood without delivering the mail."The first time I hear 'Where the [expletive] have you been all day?' I'm out of there," said Mr. Collins, a Southwest Baltimore letter carrier. "There are routes that I'm afraid to go on."It wasn't like that 10 years ago. These things used to be unheard-of."The unheard-of has become common in certain parts of Baltimore, and few people deal with it as much as those who daily cover 18,738 miles of city sidewalk to deliver the mail.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | April 28, 2008
I used to think no one in the whole world hated e-mail more than me, but that turns out to be wrong. Doctors, it seems, really hate e-mail. In fact, a new survey shows only 31 percent of doctors use e-mail to answer questions from patients outside the office. The rest still prefer the time-honored method of having a bored receptionist take your call, then calling you back days later, usually after your symptoms have subsided. According to a recent Associated Press article on the survey, there are lots of reasons doctors don't like e-mail.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | December 5, 2013
Howard County police charged two people Thursday in connection with a recent string in thefts from residential mailboxes.  Clifton Gardener, 27, of Upper Marlboro and Marian Bah, 25, of District Heights, both face seven counts of theft. Bah was also charged with possession of marijuana. Police said at about 11 a.m. Wednesday an Elkridge resident spotted the pair stealing his mail and discarding the envelopes and called police. Police, using information from the resident, were able to locate the car Gardener and Bah were traveling in and made the arrest.
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