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Mahmoud Abbas

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By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 26, 2005
NABLUS, West Bank - In the nearly two years since Ghazi and Seham Jarwan's 17-year-old son Khamis blew himself up in a small grocery store in a Tel Aviv suburb, killing a 42-year-old father, their home has become a memorial to their son's life. A life-size poster of their son greets visitors in the doorway, and photos from his toddler and schoolboy years hang on the living room wall. More posters of him plaster the alleys here in the West Bank's largest city, where Khamis Jarwan is hailed as a hero, an inspiration for others to follow, his father says.
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NEWS
April 20, 2010
Columnist Leonard Pitts could write his obituary for John McCain's integrity about every politician ("Here lies John McCain's integrity," April 18). Show me an individual running for office who has not made promises that he or she later regrets or reneges. Perhaps the writer should examine the record of Senator McCain's opponent for presidency, President Barack Obama. During his campaign he pictured himself as the best friend that Israel ever had or would have, mentioning platitudes about the strong relationship between the U.S. and Israel and the need for a safe and secure Israel as an ally of our nation.
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NEWS
June 17, 2007
The Palestinian president was speaking Thursday as he dissolved the Hamas-Fatah unity government after Hamas militia members took control of key power centers in Gaza. A Palestinian civil war was predicted as Abbas dismissed the prime minister, Ismail Haniya of Hamas, and announced that a temporary emergency government would be established until new elections can be held. ?This is madness, the madness that is going on in Gaza now.? Mahmoud Abbas
NEWS
By David Wood and David Nitkin and David Wood and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | November 27, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With a rhetorical nod toward "a more hopeful vision" of freedom and prosperity in the Middle East, President Bush opened a peace conference last night aimed at spurring a comprehensive agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. "We share a common goal - two democratic states, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in peace and security," Bush told conference participants on the eve of today's daylong session at the U.S. Naval Academy campus in Annapolis. Achieving peace "requires difficult compromises," he said at a State Department dinner.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 27, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel's foreign minister said yesterday that Mahmoud Abbas, the president of the Palestinian Authority, was "no longer relevant" in a Palestinian government that will soon be led by the militant Islamic group Hamas. The remarks by the foreign minister, Tzipi Livni, are consistent with the tough stance Israel has adopted as Hamas prepares to take power, but her view is at odds with the efforts by the United States and the European Union to work with Abbas and to bolster him. The Israeli political and security establishment views Abbas as far too weak politically to counter a Cabinet dominated by Hamas, which in its charter calls for Israel's destruction.
NEWS
April 20, 2010
Columnist Leonard Pitts could write his obituary for John McCain's integrity about every politician ("Here lies John McCain's integrity," April 18). Show me an individual running for office who has not made promises that he or she later regrets or reneges. Perhaps the writer should examine the record of Senator McCain's opponent for presidency, President Barack Obama. During his campaign he pictured himself as the best friend that Israel ever had or would have, mentioning platitudes about the strong relationship between the U.S. and Israel and the need for a safe and secure Israel as an ally of our nation.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 2005
WASHINGTON - Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon pledged yesterday to cooperate with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and work to release more Palestinian prisoners but warned that peace would not come unless terrorist attacks end. In a speech to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, a pro-Israel lobby group, Sharon said his administration would help Abbas "as long as we do not risk our security." The Palestinian leader is to meet with President Bush at the White House tomorrow and is expected to seek assurances that Israel will carry out its planned withdrawal from the Gaza Strip and four settlements in the West Bank beginning in August, and stop building settlements in the West Bank.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 19, 2006
JERUSALEM --The Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, said yesterday that he will resign if he is unable to carry out his program after legislative elections Jan. 25. Abbas defended the inclusion in the election of the Islamic group Hamas, which refuses to give up its armed wing. Hamas is expected to do well, and even if it does not win a majority, it could make it much more difficult for Abbas and Israel to discuss peace or even to coordinate policies. Hamas leaders refuse to accept the 1993 Oslo accords that set up the Palestinian Authority and are committed to the eventual eradication of Israel and a single state of Palestine.
NEWS
By Laura King and Hossam Hamalawy and Laura King and Hossam Hamalawy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2004
CAIRO, Egypt - Mahmoud Abbas, the leading candidate for the presidency of the Palestinian Authority, said yesterday that Palestinians want to begin negotiating terms of final statehood with Israel as soon as possible and hope to reach an accord by the end of next year. Abbas, who is considered a moderate, told reporters after meeting with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Cairo that Palestinians would not accept a temporary solution. "Even a state with interim borders is a waste of time," he said.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 13, 2004
MEMO TO: All Arab leaders From: President Bush Dear Gents: I'm sure you've seen the news that Israel's leader, Ariel Sharon, has decided to withdraw unilaterally from most settlements in the Gaza Strip and to relocate others in the West Bank. This presents a huge opportunity and a huge risk to Israel, the Arab world and to us. We must work to shape it right. Let's start with the risks. Don't think I'm happy about how this Sharon plan unfolded. Think about it: Last summer, the Palestinians put forward a new prime minister and security chief, Mahmoud Abbas and Mohammed Dahlan, as moderate alternatives to Yasser Arafat - just the kind of people I wanted to work with.
NEWS
By Nathan J. Diament | November 25, 2007
Past efforts at resolving the Israeli-Palestinian conflict have failed for multiple reasons, chief among them the issue of Jerusalem. And while the leaders gathering in Annapolis have agreed not to agree about the holy city's fate for now, it will likely be the unbridgeable divide in the follow-up negotiations. As Madeleine K. Albright noted, "If Jerusalem were just a real estate issue, we could have dealt with it long ago." Jerusalem is hardly a real estate issue. It is at the heart of the Israel-Arab impasse, for it relates fundamentally to history, theology and national identity.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
As Tony Blair prepares to meet his new bosses, the international Quartet on the Middle East, in Lisbon, Monday's speech by President Bush is hardly the flying start he might have hoped for. It's true that the one new element, an international conference on the region, is akin to the one which Mr. Blair pressed Mr. Bush in vain to allow him to host over two years ago. But Mr. Bush produced no other new policy, and precious little outline of how, if at...
NEWS
June 17, 2007
The Palestinian president was speaking Thursday as he dissolved the Hamas-Fatah unity government after Hamas militia members took control of key power centers in Gaza. A Palestinian civil war was predicted as Abbas dismissed the prime minister, Ismail Haniya of Hamas, and announced that a temporary emergency government would be established until new elections can be held. ?This is madness, the madness that is going on in Gaza now.? Mahmoud Abbas
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | December 19, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- Neither elections nor policy reviews have yet prodded President Bush into adopting a reality-based approach to Iraq or the Mideast. The president still talks of "victory" in Iraq as he rejects the proposals of the Iraq Study Group and delays presenting his new Iraq plan. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice insists we have reached a Mideast "clarifying moment" that will impel Arab moderates to line up against the extremists. Meantime, Arab extremists are making dangerous gains that will multiply next year unless the White House deals with the Mideast we have, not the Mideast of dreams.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Rushdi Abu Alouf and Richard Boudreaux and Rushdi Abu Alouf,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2006
KHAN YUNIS, Gaza Strip -- Palestinian Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh cut short a visit abroad yesterday after gunmen killed a judge from his Hamas movement on the fourth straight day of factional violence in the Gaza Strip. The fighting among Palestinians came as Israeli soldiers shot a Palestinian through the Israel-Gaza border fence, the first killing in the territory by Israeli forces since a cease-fire began 18 days ago. A Hamas statement accused the Fatah Party - led by Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas - of sending a police death squad to ambush Judge Bassam Fara on his way to work.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 21, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The Bush administration expressed support yesterday for the efforts by the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, to establish a national unity government with Hamas, but said the United States would continue to withhold aid from the Palestinian Authority. Washington's European allies have been pushing President Bush to engage more fully in peace efforts in the Middle East. An announcement yesterday by the four powers of the so-called quartet that have been working to promote peace negotiations - the European Union, the United States, Russia and the United Nations - that they support Abbas' efforts came as part of talks on the periphery of the General Assembly.
NEWS
July 19, 2007
As Tony Blair prepares to meet his new bosses, the international Quartet on the Middle East, in Lisbon, Monday's speech by President Bush is hardly the flying start he might have hoped for. It's true that the one new element, an international conference on the region, is akin to the one which Mr. Blair pressed Mr. Bush in vain to allow him to host over two years ago. But Mr. Bush produced no other new policy, and precious little outline of how, if at...
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 15, 2004
JERUSALEM - Mahmoud Abbas, the interim Palestinian leader, said in an interview published yesterday that the armed struggle against Israel was a mistake and should end. Abbas, favored to become president of the Palestinian Authority in elections next month, also said it was time to rein in a hodgepodge of rival Palestinian security forces and halt what he called a climate of lawlessness. Abbas criticized the armed intifada, or uprising, while he was prime minister briefly in 2003, saying the violence hurt Palestinians more than it helped.
NEWS
By BARRY RUBIN | May 25, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Will there be a Palestinian civil war? Probably not. But a major struggle is under way that may be the biggest internal Palestinian conflict in memory, perhaps in history. On one level, the battle is between Hamas and Fatah, between Islamism and nationalism. It is also a struggle between two groups, each wanting the fruits of leadership: power, prestige, money. With the demise of unchallenged Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat and - no less important - with his Fatah movement's inability to gain a state because of intransigence, the way was open for the rise of Hamas, or the Islamic Resistance Movement.
NEWS
By LAURA KING and LAURA KING,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 23, 2006
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -- A fierce gunbattle erupted yesterday outside the Palestinian parliament building between rival Palestinian security forces, killing one man, wounding about a dozen people and deepening the sense of anarchy gripping the Gaza Strip. Passers-by scattered in panic as gunmen - some of them belonging to a new Hamas-led police force and others to a unit loyal to the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas - crouched against graffiti-covered walls and behind parked cars, squeezing off rounds from their automatic rifles and firing rocket-propelled grenades in one another's direction.
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