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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 9, 2004
When you hear Stephanie Mills' new CD, Born For This!, don't be fooled by the tales of heartache, pain and betrayal. These days, the diminutive pop-soul veteran is happier than she's ever been. The record, her first in almost 10 years, was released in August on her own label, JM Records, and has been well-received by critics and urban radio. At age 47, the doting mother of a 3-year-old son is in control of her career -- making music that reflects who she really is. And life seems to be more peaceful without the constant pressures of staying in the Top 10. Calling from her home in Charlotte, N.C., Mills says, "I've grown so much.
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FEATURES
By Sarai Brinker | July 24, 2013
Winner of the Editor's Choice Award from Children's Technology Review, this fun application from PBS engages young scientists with beautiful graphics and intriguing games that emphasize math and science skills. A spin-off from the hit series “Sid the Science Kid,” this app encourages your child to experiment, collect and organize data and think like a real scientist. Kids are transported to Sid's school, where there is a science fair going on. At the science fair there are three “exhibits,” interactive games with which players can engage.
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NEWS
October 17, 1994
August F. Crabtree, 89, creator of a collection of 16 miniature ships on display at the Mariners' Museum in Newport News, Va., since the 1950s, died Thursday in Grafton, Va. He worked for 28 years on the display, some of it so small that a magnifying glass is needed to make out the details. Among his other works was a collection of U.S. presidents, each about one-fourth of an inch tall.Charles "Bill: Moss, 71, who invented the dome-shaped pop tent in 1955, died in Phoenix Oct. 7. Other well-known designs include The Stargazer, a tent on display at New York's Museum of Modern Art, and a fabric sculpture in 1986 for the ceiling of the Seattle Coliseum.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | February 23, 2006
All along the streets of the Harford County subdivision that Olympic figure skater Kimmie Meissner calls home, neighbors have red, white and blue ribbons affixed to their mailboxes. Handmade posters that were blown down recently by high winds quickly reappeared in living room windows. A few houses down from the Meissners, Michael Watts has handmade signs as well, tucked away in his garage. They were made by many of the same neighbors a few years ago to wish Watts' stepson well as he left for duty in Iraq.
FEATURES
By Sarai Brinker | July 24, 2013
Winner of the Editor's Choice Award from Children's Technology Review, this fun application from PBS engages young scientists with beautiful graphics and intriguing games that emphasize math and science skills. A spin-off from the hit series “Sid the Science Kid,” this app encourages your child to experiment, collect and organize data and think like a real scientist. Kids are transported to Sid's school, where there is a science fair going on. At the science fair there are three “exhibits,” interactive games with which players can engage.
NEWS
By JACK L. LEVIN | February 27, 1995
Dylan Thomas' advice is open to questions: ''Do not go gentle into that good night,'' he said. ''Rage, rage against the dying of the light.''I've been raging like crazy, but the light keeps dying and I can't see a big bullseye target on a barn door. With all the raging, I have less than 10 percent of normal eyesight, which makes legally blind.Here are a few of the things that keep me raging.At the top of my list is dependence on others to drive my wife and me on social occasions with other couples.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 26, 2004
FOOTBALL IS a money-losing proposition for all but a handful of Division I schools. Even those are generally the schools that sold their souls to the devil. Or, in the case of the University of Washington, Rick Neuheisel. It doesn't much matter if it's Division I-A, with 85 scholarships to pay for, or Division I-AA, which allows 60 free rides, plus time, materials and coaches. It's still such a bad deal, a college president or athletic director doesn't need a magnifying glass to read the fine print on the warnings.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 18, 1998
SACRAMENTO -- The man in the labor-sponsored television ad peers through a large magnifying glass at Proposition 226, called by its backers the "paycheck protection" initiative on California's June 2 ballot."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 13, 1991
For almost 50 years it had languished in a box at the Baltimore Museum of Art -- carefully stored, not ignored, but thought of secondary importance among the museum's 250 Rembrandt prints: a counterproof of the first state of an etching titled "Jan Uytenbogaert, Receiver-General ('The Gold-Weigher')" (1639).Interesting to have, especially since the collection also includes two impressions of the final state -- or stage of development -- of the same print; but not really worth exhibiting.Then, about two months ago, when he was preparing the exhibit "Rembrandt: The Museum's Collection," which opens Tuesday, Jay M. Fisher, BMA curator of prints, drawings and photographs, invited his counterpart at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Rembrandt scholar Clifford Ackley, down to Baltimore to look at the collection.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The last time many voters really thought about the way they cast ballots was nearly four years ago, as they watched a Florida election judge peer through a magnifying glass at a simple punch card, straining to determine who its original handler hoped would be president. The recount in 2000 is what gave birth to Vote: The Machinery of Democracy, an exhibit displaying the ways Americans have voted over the years, which is running through the end of January at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 9, 2004
When you hear Stephanie Mills' new CD, Born For This!, don't be fooled by the tales of heartache, pain and betrayal. These days, the diminutive pop-soul veteran is happier than she's ever been. The record, her first in almost 10 years, was released in August on her own label, JM Records, and has been well-received by critics and urban radio. At age 47, the doting mother of a 3-year-old son is in control of her career -- making music that reflects who she really is. And life seems to be more peaceful without the constant pressures of staying in the Top 10. Calling from her home in Charlotte, N.C., Mills says, "I've grown so much.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The last time many voters really thought about the way they cast ballots was nearly four years ago, as they watched a Florida election judge peer through a magnifying glass at a simple punch card, straining to determine who its original handler hoped would be president. The recount in 2000 is what gave birth to Vote: The Machinery of Democracy, an exhibit displaying the ways Americans have voted over the years, which is running through the end of January at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | September 26, 2004
FOOTBALL IS a money-losing proposition for all but a handful of Division I schools. Even those are generally the schools that sold their souls to the devil. Or, in the case of the University of Washington, Rick Neuheisel. It doesn't much matter if it's Division I-A, with 85 scholarships to pay for, or Division I-AA, which allows 60 free rides, plus time, materials and coaches. It's still such a bad deal, a college president or athletic director doesn't need a magnifying glass to read the fine print on the warnings.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | June 9, 2002
Who remembers their first camping trip? Maybe it was a scouting outing or a family vacation, when everyone learned precisely how loud Dad snored. Or maybe it was just you and your best friend in a pup tent pitched in the back yard, scaring each other silly with ghost stories. Camping is a great way to get in touch with your inner Lewis and Clark overnight, for a long weekend or for a week. And if you hate it - and lots of folks quickly learn to - the Motel 6 outpost is a bushwhack away.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2000
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. - On Wednesday, moments after a crisp, sparring workout before the assembled media at Detroit's historic Brewster Wheeler Center, heavyweight Mike Tyson sat down at ringside next to a little girl and playfully peered through a magnifying glass she offered him. A few minutes later, Tyson cursed and ripped the media, which he says have unfairly held his personal and professional life under a magnifying glass and broadcast it to the...
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Bill Bradley and Al Gore are bookish political moderates who have staked out leadership roles on issues from high-performance computing to interventionist foreign policies, while establishing voting records that are surprisingly similar.So last week, when Friends of the Earth's political action committee endorsed Bradley over Gore for the Democratic presidential nomination, the question was not simply why the group abandoned a vice president who considers himself an aggressive environmental advocate.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2000
AUBURN HILLS, Mich. - On Wednesday, moments after a crisp, sparring workout before the assembled media at Detroit's historic Brewster Wheeler Center, heavyweight Mike Tyson sat down at ringside next to a little girl and playfully peered through a magnifying glass she offered him. A few minutes later, Tyson cursed and ripped the media, which he says have unfairly held his personal and professional life under a magnifying glass and broadcast it to the...
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | February 23, 2006
All along the streets of the Harford County subdivision that Olympic figure skater Kimmie Meissner calls home, neighbors have red, white and blue ribbons affixed to their mailboxes. Handmade posters that were blown down recently by high winds quickly reappeared in living room windows. A few houses down from the Meissners, Michael Watts has handmade signs as well, tucked away in his garage. They were made by many of the same neighbors a few years ago to wish Watts' stepson well as he left for duty in Iraq.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | May 18, 1998
SACRAMENTO -- The man in the labor-sponsored television ad peers through a large magnifying glass at Proposition 226, called by its backers the "paycheck protection" initiative on California's June 2 ballot."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 15, 1997
It's nice, but not necessary to go to Italy, Germany or anywhere in Europe for your art getaway this summer. Consider a destination closer to home, which requires a trip of no more than an hour, costs little more than the gasoline to get you there, and offers treasures by the cornucopia.There are splendors from India, riches from Portugal, shipboard excursions to cool you off and great art names galore, from John Singer Sargent to Jasper Johns to Richard Diebenkorn.We're talking Washington, of course, where museums come by the dozens, where most of them are free, and where there are carloads of art for every taste.
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