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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 16, 1996
LUDWIGSHAFEN, Germany -- BASF AG bowed out of the highly competitive audio and videotape business yesterday without any worries about giving up the product that made it a household name around the world.In fact, the German multinational seemed a bit relieved to shed the business that overshadowed its global position in chemicals, pharmaceuticals, plastics, oil and gas."We have a cassette as an advertisement for a chemical company. There is absolutely no connection there," explained BASF Management Board member Max Dietrich Kley.
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 23, 2007
Having spent last week on vacation sans Internet, I had to wait until today to extend a slightly belated happy 25th birthday to a gadget that forever changed the way we entertain ourselves. On Aug. 17, 1982, the first compact disk (or disc) rolled off a German production line, paving the way for a generation of devices that can now cram a thousand hours of hours of music or more into a box the size of deck of cards. The technology that made the CD possible has also changed the dynamic of the music business - including the role of artists, the companies who market their music, and those of us who listen to it. Ironically, that same technology now threatens to make the CD irrelevant.
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | August 23, 2007
Having spent last week on vacation sans Internet, I had to wait until today to extend a slightly belated happy 25th birthday to a gadget that forever changed the way we entertain ourselves. On Aug. 17, 1982, the first compact disk (or disc) rolled off a German production line, paving the way for a generation of devices that can now cram a thousand hours of hours of music or more into a box the size of deck of cards. The technology that made the CD possible has also changed the dynamic of the music business - including the role of artists, the companies who market their music, and those of us who listen to it. Ironically, that same technology now threatens to make the CD irrelevant.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIST | March 30, 2006
A physicist working for International Business Machines Corp. has spread fear and loathing among digital photographers, music fans and others who store data on CDs. His message: The disks we're using to archive photos, album tracks and financial records may turn into useless lumps of plastic after two to five years. A January Computerworld article quoted Kurt Gerecke, a storage expert in Germany, who warned that the dye that forms tiny pits in the surface of a CD-R can degrade to the point where the laser in a CD-ROM drive can't read them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington | November 27, 2003
Easy-to-use DVD camcorder exceeds tape's image quality A loyal reader has called periodically during the past couple of years to ask what I thought of DVD camcorders. I've finally got some good news for him when he calls next. The Panasonic VDR-M30PP DVD Palmcorder Camcorder ($899) does much of what you would expect of instant DVD recording with few hassles. The technology allows you to record on 1.4-gigabyte, 8-cm DVD-RAM and DVD-R discs, but playback can be tricky. Some users have reported problems playing back DVD-R discs in DVD players, and DVD-RAM won't play in a regular DVD player.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ and MIKE HIMOWITZ,SUN COLUMNIST | March 30, 2006
A physicist working for International Business Machines Corp. has spread fear and loathing among digital photographers, music fans and others who store data on CDs. His message: The disks we're using to archive photos, album tracks and financial records may turn into useless lumps of plastic after two to five years. A January Computerworld article quoted Kurt Gerecke, a storage expert in Germany, who warned that the dye that forms tiny pits in the surface of a CD-R can degrade to the point where the laser in a CD-ROM drive can't read them.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 24, 1995
Records were created to make musical performances immortal. But after almost 100 years of memorializing classical music's past, records are now in the late stages of destroying its future.Recording transformed musical performance from a one-of-a-kind event into something permanent and repeatable. The masterpieces of the past, previously available only in concert, became easily accessible. Constant repetition of these works -- in the home, in the car and on Walkmans -- has robbed them of their magic.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson and Randi Henderson,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 7, 1991
To the hip, sophisticated New York art world comes Marlou Freeman, a waitress and bartender who shares an apartment with a cat named Sox and has dreams of buying her own mobile home.It was the unwieldy prospect of moving her collection of 2,300 refrigerator magnets that had the unlikely consequence of landing Ms. Freeman in the art world.And the collection may be the ticket to a new and different lifestyle, with considerably more wealth than the 47-year-old waitress at O'Toole's Road House Restaurant in Laurel ever envisioned for herself.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1992
Maryland contractsVitro Corp. in Silver Spring, won a $5,303,959 contract from the Army to provide an exercise option for AWIS tech specialty services.Racal Communications Inc. in Rockville, won a $433,275 contract from the Army to provide communications equipment.Hughes STX Corp. in Lanham, won a $159,669 contract from NASA to provide X-ray astronomy research.Non-defense contractsCostabile Associates Inc. in Bethesda won a $78,544 contract from the National Library of Medicine to revise cataloging-in-publication records.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1992
This is a weekly summary of selected prime contracts recently awarded by the federal government to companies and other vendors in Maryland.MARYLAND CONTRACTS* Vitro Corp. in Silver Spring, won a $5,303,959 contract from the Army to provide an exercise option for AWIS tech specialty services.* Racal Communications Inc. in Rockville, won a $433,275 contract from the Army to provide communications equipment.Hughes STX Corp. in Lanham, won a $159,669 contract from NASA to provide X-ray astronomy research.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington | November 27, 2003
Easy-to-use DVD camcorder exceeds tape's image quality A loyal reader has called periodically during the past couple of years to ask what I thought of DVD camcorders. I've finally got some good news for him when he calls next. The Panasonic VDR-M30PP DVD Palmcorder Camcorder ($899) does much of what you would expect of instant DVD recording with few hassles. The technology allows you to record on 1.4-gigabyte, 8-cm DVD-RAM and DVD-R discs, but playback can be tricky. Some users have reported problems playing back DVD-R discs in DVD players, and DVD-RAM won't play in a regular DVD player.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 16, 1996
LUDWIGSHAFEN, Germany -- BASF AG bowed out of the highly competitive audio and videotape business yesterday without any worries about giving up the product that made it a household name around the world.In fact, the German multinational seemed a bit relieved to shed the business that overshadowed its global position in chemicals, pharmaceuticals, plastics, oil and gas."We have a cassette as an advertisement for a chemical company. There is absolutely no connection there," explained BASF Management Board member Max Dietrich Kley.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 24, 1995
Records were created to make musical performances immortal. But after almost 100 years of memorializing classical music's past, records are now in the late stages of destroying its future.Recording transformed musical performance from a one-of-a-kind event into something permanent and repeatable. The masterpieces of the past, previously available only in concert, became easily accessible. Constant repetition of these works -- in the home, in the car and on Walkmans -- has robbed them of their magic.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson and Randi Henderson,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 7, 1991
To the hip, sophisticated New York art world comes Marlou Freeman, a waitress and bartender who shares an apartment with a cat named Sox and has dreams of buying her own mobile home.It was the unwieldy prospect of moving her collection of 2,300 refrigerator magnets that had the unlikely consequence of landing Ms. Freeman in the art world.And the collection may be the ticket to a new and different lifestyle, with considerably more wealth than the 47-year-old waitress at O'Toole's Road House Restaurant in Laurel ever envisioned for herself.
NEWS
March 15, 1995
Franciszek Gajowniczek, 94, who spent years paying homage to a Franciscan monk who died in place of him at Auschwitz, died Monday in Warsaw, Poland. In July 1941, the Nazis selected him and nine other men to die of starvation as punishment for another prisoner's escape. After listening to Mr. Gajowniczek speak of his wife and two sons, the Rev. Maximilian Kolbe volunteered to die in his place.Father Kolbe survived more than 14 days in a starvation bunker with no food or water. The Nazis ended his life in August 1941 with a lethal injection.
NEWS
July 1, 1999
Samdach Vira Bhante, 110, a Cambodian monk who attained the highest spiritual status in Buddhism and advised leaders of Cambodia and India, died Saturday in Stockton, Calif. He served as a spiritual adviser to Cambodia's King Norodom Sihanouk and kept watch at the deathbed of India's first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru.Brian O'Hara, 58, former singer and guitarist with the Fourmost, a 1960s Liverpool group that shared a manager with the Beatles and had hits with songs written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, was found hanged Sunday at his home in the Wavertree area of the northern England port city, police said.
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