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Magnetic Levitation

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NEWS
By Doug Birch | October 25, 1990
An MIT professor preached revolution in Baltimore this week -- a revolution that, he said, would slash U.S. energy consumption, reduce pollution and ease gridlock.Richard D. Thornton, an electrical engineering teacher and adviser to the U.S. Senate's Public Works Committee, said the country should build a nationwide network of magnetic levitation, or maglev, systems -- trains that fly an inch or so above their monorail-style tracks on a cushion of magnetism at speeds in excess of 300 mph.The technology was invented in the United States during the 1960s, and a version was developed by Mr. Thornton and a group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who built and tested a working-scale model in 1974.
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By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2002
BILL WITHUHN took his first and only ride on a magnetic levitation train in 1989 while visiting the test track of a prototype train in Germany. The Smithsonian Institution's longtime transportation curator was impressed with the system, which uses magnetic fields to quietly propel cars along a friction-free rail at speeds nearing 300 mph. "It was like an airplane on takeoff - without the rumble," he says. "Smooth as glass." At the time of his visit, the train had undergone a decade of testing.
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NEWS
April 2, 1991
Will a day come when passengers can hop on a train in downtown Baltimore and arrive in downtown Washington 15 minutes later? Boosters of the "magnetic levitation" concept say such speed and convenience could be possible by the year 2000 -- if Congress can be persuaded to back a $600-million project to demonstrate the versatility of these quiet, vibration-free trains.The new technology is mind-boggling. Magnetic levitation trains, instead of riding on steel wheels and rails, would float above a roadbed to which they are linked by electromagnetic forces.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 28, 1999
A Connecticut-based company will provide support to Maryland and six other applicants studying whether a magnetic levitation train would work in their areas. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater announced Friday that MK Centennial, based in Hamden, Conn., has been awarded the federal contract to provide engineering services, professional staff and other assistance to Maryland, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, Atlanta, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Port Canaveral, Fla. The contract amount was not immediately available.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 28, 1999
A Connecticut-based company will provide support to Maryland and six other applicants studying whether a magnetic levitation train would work in their areas. U.S. Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater announced Friday that MK Centennial, based in Hamden, Conn., has been awarded the federal contract to provide engineering services, professional staff and other assistance to Maryland, Pittsburgh, New Orleans, Atlanta, Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Port Canaveral, Fla. The contract amount was not immediately available.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 20, 1991
An article in yesterday's Business section about a proposed magnetic levitation railroad incorrectly named a founder of the B&O Railroad. The founder was Charles Carroll.The Sun regrets the errors.ANNAPOLIS -- John Carroll, one of the founders of the nation's first commercial railroad in 1832, understandably could not make it to the House Ways and Means Committee yesterday to testify about magnetic levitation rail.So one of his descendants took up the charge."Primarily because of this historic confluence, we have the opportunity to create a basic transportation system in Maryland again," said Richard Carroll Kauffman, a Baltimore resident and distant relative of the 19th century politician who helpedstart the B&O Railroad in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration started the wheels rolling yesterday on a proposal to link U.S. cities with a network of high-speed trains.The $1.3 billion program includes about $1 billion to upgrade railroad corridors and slightly under $300 million toward research and development, including support for new magnetic levitation technology.During his campaign for the presidency last year, President Clinton promised to support high-speed rail technology. Rail advocates had hoped for a larger investment from the federal government.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
If engineers in Baltimore and Washington are chosen to design the nation's first magnetic levitation train, they can call on 13-year-olds Ryan Corces and Drew Graybeal for help.With 75 cents' worth of Styrofoam, tape, glue and a motor half the length of a shotgun shell, the duo from Mount View Middle School in Howard County had one of the fastest trains to zip down a 24-foot track set up in the Baltimore Museum of Industry yesterday for the Maryland Engineering Challenge."If we had started with this one we would've gotten at least 20" trips down the track, Drew said, holding the speedy red Mount View train that made six trips.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Space crafts landing at the Baltimore Museum of Industry yesterday didn't herald a new age in interplanetary travel, but they may have launched a few hundred careers in technology.And even if the number is far smaller than that, students participating in the fourth annual Engineering Challenge competition learned that there is much more to science than theorems, equations and book learning.There are things such as designing a bridge, a cargo crane or a magnetic levitation train.This weekend, 135 teams of students from 65 schools throughout Maryland are showing how young minds working together can solve technological problems not unlike those professional engineers face.
NEWS
December 15, 1992
Baltimore aspires to become the testing ground for a futuristic magnetic levitation train that whooshes along at 300 mph on a magnetic field. Already in use in Germany and Japan, the system is essentially a levitated train that rides on air. Several cities are vying for the federal government's prototype. Aside from the jobs such a massive public works project could bring, the project is seen as a boon for economic development, tourism and mass transit. The idea would seem to have the name "William Donald Schaefer" written all over it.Yet the governor has been uncharacteristically lukewarm to the concept.
NEWS
June 10, 1999
Maglev trains could unite region, northeast corridor"The Outlook" column in The Sun recently addressed prospects for high-speed magnetic levitation (Maglev) train service in the Baltimore-Washington area (" `Maglev' trains could speed growth over Md., some say," May 30).A 1994 study of Maglev service between Camden Yards and Union Station demonstrated that it would increase tourism and economic, social and recreational interaction between the two urban areas.Since the Maglev trains would travel betweeen the cities in 16 minutes, they would make it feasible for people who work in Washington to live in the lower-cost Baltimore area and for Baltimoreans to have lunch in Washington and perhaps visit a museum before getting back to work.
NEWS
By Diane B. Mikulis and Diane B. Mikulis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 1999
GLENWOOD MIDDLE School held its annual Enrichment Fair on May 20. More than 300 pupils exhibited projects related to classroom work on topics in science or social studies, and participation in service groups, peer mediation, outdoor education and school bands. They also exhibited projects involving independent research and problem-solving.County Executive James N. Robey was one of the hundreds who visited the displays and talked with pupils. Priscilla Geisler, the fair's organizer, said, "The kids were just ecstatic that Robey was there."
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | May 21, 1999
In the race for federal money to build the nation's first high-speed magnetic levitation train, Maryland will take a big step forward next week as one of a handful of states awarded funds for formal studies."
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1999
If engineers in Baltimore and Washington are chosen to design the nation's first magnetic levitation train, they can call on 13-year-olds Ryan Corces and Drew Graybeal for help.With 75 cents' worth of Styrofoam, tape, glue and a motor half the length of a shotgun shell, the duo from Mount View Middle School in Howard County had one of the fastest trains to zip down a 24-foot track set up in the Baltimore Museum of Industry yesterday for the Maryland Engineering Challenge."If we had started with this one we would've gotten at least 20" trips down the track, Drew said, holding the speedy red Mount View train that made six trips.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 8, 1997
Get ready to dance naked in the streets, because scientists have finally done something that humanity has long dreamed about, but most of us thought would never happen within our lifetimes.That's right: They have levitated a frog.I swear I am not making this up. According to an Associated Press article sent in by a number of alert readers, British and Dutch scientists "have succeeded in floating a frog in air." They did this by using magnetism, which, as you recall from physics class, is a powerful force that causes certain items to be attracted to refrigerators.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration started the wheels rolling yesterday on a proposal to link U.S. cities with a network of high-speed trains.The $1.3 billion program includes about $1 billion to upgrade railroad corridors and slightly under $300 million toward research and development, including support for new magnetic levitation technology.During his campaign for the presidency last year, President Clinton promised to support high-speed rail technology. Rail advocates had hoped for a larger investment from the federal government.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | October 25, 1992
Trains that float on a cushion of magnetism at more than 300 mph may seem like a notion lifted from some hokey science fiction novel.But magnetic levitation trains have operated on test tracks for more than a decade in Germany and Japan. And an international group, using German technology, plans to start building the world's first high-speed passenger line in Florida next year.The real challenge, a National Research Council report warned last year, is to demonstrate that "maglev" can handle the perils and punishment of serving the traveling public.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 8, 1997
Get ready to dance naked in the streets, because scientists have finally done something that humanity has long dreamed about, but most of us thought would never happen within our lifetimes.That's right: They have levitated a frog.I swear I am not making this up. According to an Associated Press article sent in by a number of alert readers, British and Dutch scientists "have succeeded in floating a frog in air." They did this by using magnetism, which, as you recall from physics class, is a powerful force that causes certain items to be attracted to refrigerators.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Space crafts landing at the Baltimore Museum of Industry yesterday didn't herald a new age in interplanetary travel, but they may have launched a few hundred careers in technology.And even if the number is far smaller than that, students participating in the fourth annual Engineering Challenge competition learned that there is much more to science than theorems, equations and book learning.There are things such as designing a bridge, a cargo crane or a magnetic levitation train.This weekend, 135 teams of students from 65 schools throughout Maryland are showing how young minds working together can solve technological problems not unlike those professional engineers face.
NEWS
By Karen Zeiler | February 19, 1993
Some options to get you out of the house and shake the shivery winter doldrums:SALUTE SOME ENGINEERS:It probably sneaked up on you again, but National Engineers' Week is almost upon us, and the city has several things you can do to celebrate:* Tour the USS Boulder, a 500-foot-long, tank-carrying Navy landing ship docked at Inner Harbor's West Wall. (Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. tomorrow.) The Navy sent the ship to host receptions for the seventh annual Black Engineer of the Year Awards, sponsored by Mobil Oil and Black Engineer magazine, which is published by Baltimore's Career Communications Group.
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