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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 8, 2004
I suffered from insomnia for three miserable years during menopause. My doctor prescribed Sonata but could not guarantee more than four hours of uninterrupted sleep nightly. I decided not to spend money on a prescription for so little benefit. Over-the-counter sleeping pills didn't agree with me. Then I read in a book on natural health that calcium and magnesium might help. I started taking Citracal Plus with Magnesium. Ever since, I've been sleeping like a baby (a lazy one, mind you, not the colicky kind)
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | February 23, 2009
W.R. Grace & Co. and five former managers go on trial today, accused of exposing a Montana community for decades to a particularly lethal form of asbestos and concealing what the company knew about the dangers. The Columbia-based chemical manufacturer has denied the allegations. Officials at the global company, which employs more than 1,100 in Maryland, say that managers worked continually to improve safety at the vermiculite mine and mill that it bought near Libby, Mont., in 1963 and operated until 1990.
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NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2005
Despite years of nagging about nutrition, people still aren't heeding the message about eating right, according to a major study of the nation's diet. Americans need more calcium and fiber, more of vitamins A, C and E, and magnesium. The findings are part of the most comprehensive portrait yet of the nation's eating habits, a survey of 8,940 people done by a Beltsville-based branch of the federal Agricultural Research Service. They bear out what many experts have long been saying. "Americans still eat a lot of junk food," said Bonnie Liebman, director of nutrition at the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | November 1, 2007
I want to thank you for writing about turmeric. I had psoriasis on my feet and my hands so bad that I lost all my nails on my fingers. I went to doctor after doctor to heal my psoriasis, but nothing worked. When I saw the article, I thought I'd try it. I started to put turmeric on my food and in my coffee. Within two weeks, my psoriasis had started to heal. Within three weeks, it had cleared up. I have been free of psoriasis for six months now. Turmeric is a yellow spice that is an important ingredient in curry powder.
NEWS
By Susan Ferraro and By Susan Ferraro,New York Daily News | June 16, 2002
Five years ago, migraines were making Nelson Zotelo miserable. "I am a waiter. Can you imagine, when you have a headache, how hard that is?" says Zotelo of the bad old days. Seeking relief, the 46-year-old New Yorker went to Dr. Barbara Levine, a nutritionist at Rockefeller University and Weill Cornell Medical Center. She suggested he take 200 milligrams of the natural mineral magnesium daily. "Just taking the magnesium, that's it," says Zotelo. "I used to have heavy pain. Now I feel very good."
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN King Features Syndicate | July 15, 1997
About a year ago, I came across a letter by a physician in the Lancet. One of his patients had leg cramps and the doctor recommended what many Brits took in India -- a glass of tonic water at bedtime.He said there was enough quinine in tonic to help with this problem. The patient's wife later told the doctor that it had really done the trick. However, she did have one complaint: It seems that their liquor bill had increased, since the patient had decided to add a shot of gin to the tonic before drinking!
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 4, 1992
In an era of skyrocketing drug costs, researchers have shown that a $2 infusion with one of the earth's most common elements greatly reduces the complications of open heart surgery.When given in the closing minutes of heart surgery, magnesium cut in half the frequency of abnormal heart rhythms, lessened the need for drugs to combat arythmias and shortened the time patients spent on respirators.Dr. Bart Chernow, the chief physician at Baltimore's Sinai Hospital, said yesterday he was so delighted with the findings that he believes one-time magnesium infusions should be given to all patients undergoing heart bypass and valve replacement surgery.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | November 1, 2007
I want to thank you for writing about turmeric. I had psoriasis on my feet and my hands so bad that I lost all my nails on my fingers. I went to doctor after doctor to heal my psoriasis, but nothing worked. When I saw the article, I thought I'd try it. I started to put turmeric on my food and in my coffee. Within two weeks, my psoriasis had started to heal. Within three weeks, it had cleared up. I have been free of psoriasis for six months now. Turmeric is a yellow spice that is an important ingredient in curry powder.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | October 28, 2005
Can terpin hydrate still be purchased without a prescription? I've never found another cough syrup that works as well. Terpin hydrate was a popular cough medicine from the late 1800s until the mid-1990s. Then the Food and Drug Administration banned it on the grounds that it had not been proven effective. As an expectorant, terpin hydrate was supposed to loosen mucus and relieve coughs. It was derived from natural sources such as oil of turpentine or compounds found in oregano, thyme and eucalyptus.
FEATURES
January 12, 1997
Several of my houseplants have developed brown spots that seem to be growing in size. I just got these plants as a Christmas present and don't want to lose them. What can I do?Leaf spots that enlarge are symptoms of diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, viruses or nematodes. Under severe conditions the spots or lesions may run together, killing entire leaves or the whole plant. Your plants may have been infected when you received them. Pick off the infected leaves, move plants apart to increase air movement, avoid misting and allow the top of the growing medium to dry before watering.
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | August 11, 2006
I just read your column on plantar warts. My doctor suggested I use fingernail polish, covering the wart twice a day for three weeks. I believe the wart died within 10 days of doing that treatment. It was easy and painless. Have you ever heard of this, and do you know why it worked? We've heard of using fingernail polish or instant glue on warts to "smother" them. We doubt if that is why it works, though, since the virus that causes warts doesn't need to breathe. Whatever the mechanism, this trick seems to be effective for some people.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2005
Despite years of nagging about nutrition, people still aren't heeding the message about eating right, according to a major study of the nation's diet. Americans need more calcium and fiber, more of vitamins A, C and E, and magnesium. The findings are part of the most comprehensive portrait yet of the nation's eating habits, a survey of 8,940 people done by a Beltsville-based branch of the federal Agricultural Research Service. They bear out what many experts have long been saying. "Americans still eat a lot of junk food," said Bonnie Liebman, director of nutrition at the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 8, 2004
I suffered from insomnia for three miserable years during menopause. My doctor prescribed Sonata but could not guarantee more than four hours of uninterrupted sleep nightly. I decided not to spend money on a prescription for so little benefit. Over-the-counter sleeping pills didn't agree with me. Then I read in a book on natural health that calcium and magnesium might help. I started taking Citracal Plus with Magnesium. Ever since, I've been sleeping like a baby (a lazy one, mind you, not the colicky kind)
NEWS
By Jane Allen and Jane Allen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 7, 2004
For years, Joan Rozen lived on Excedrin pills, too busy as a mother and teacher to bow to daily migraine headaches. "Sometimes, they would get so intense I would get nauseated, but I just had to keep going," said Rozen, 60, of Binghamton, N.Y. A couple of years ago, her son Todd, a neurologist, suggested that coenzyme Q10, a dietary supplement he had studied for migraine prevention, might break her dependence on the aspirin-based pills. She began taking 150 milligrams daily and was told the medication could take a few months to work.
NEWS
By Susan Ferraro and By Susan Ferraro,New York Daily News | June 16, 2002
Five years ago, migraines were making Nelson Zotelo miserable. "I am a waiter. Can you imagine, when you have a headache, how hard that is?" says Zotelo of the bad old days. Seeking relief, the 46-year-old New Yorker went to Dr. Barbara Levine, a nutritionist at Rockefeller University and Weill Cornell Medical Center. She suggested he take 200 milligrams of the natural mineral magnesium daily. "Just taking the magnesium, that's it," says Zotelo. "I used to have heavy pain. Now I feel very good."
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 24, 2001
JALALABAD, Afghanistan - Throughout the Taliban years, a large, wealthy community of al-Qaida members moved to this war-broken city - and thrived. In a land of mud houses and donkey travel, hundreds of expatriate terrorists built compounds and schools for their families on government land, cut deals with local authorities and bumped over Jalalabad's dirt roads in new pickup trucks. "We never had a conversation, because they never let Afghan people near them," said Mohammed Sharif, who lives next door to a Jalalabad compound that was home to 60 al-Qaida members.
NEWS
June 26, 1994
Magnesium's RoleI read with interest your article "More calcium throughout life urged" (June 9) and applaud your efforts to bring this information about calcium to your readers. However, I was disappointed to see that your story covered only that which related to calcium and omitted relevant and serious discussion about magnesium.Data were presented in the discussion periods at the National Institutes of Health consensus conference as to the importance of calcium's interrelations with other nutrients, and I stressed, in particular, magnesium.
FEATURES
By Universal Press Syndicate | August 4, 1992
It's not that hard to relaxTaking a nice hot bath or a long walk appears to give you just as much relief from stress and anxiety as any fancy meditation technique. So says a recent report from the National Academy of Sciences. Report contributor Gerald Davison, a psychologist from the University of Southern California, found no evidence that meditation techniques, which generally involve the repetition of a key word or phrase called a mantra, reduce stress or blood pressure any better than taking a walk on a regular basis or simply "hanging out" at home.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1998
State police identified yesterday the two people killed in the crash of a World War II-era military training plane Sunday night on Kent Island.Police identified one victim as Thomas E. Bayne Jr., 49, an official of Flying Tiger Restorations in Waldorf, where he lived. Also killed was Martin T. Lange, 34, of Fort Wayne, Ind., police said.Police said it was not clear who was the pilot.Both men were pronounced dead at the crash scene in a wooded area along Columbia Lane in a subdivision known as Queen Anne Colony, police said.
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